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Full text of "Annual report of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board"

J TAN WATER 



m SEWERAGE BOARD 



" Vvhif^ All A 



DECEM:BSR 31,1912. 



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Compliments 

Metrop 

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w. ^P« ^® 




IE Board. 



William n. Davenport 



'N Place, 

BOSTON, 






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ivEN By 



^A<A>Vb 





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Compliments of . 

ME^^OUTAN WAm AN» SE«„A« BOABa 

JAMES A. BAILEY. Jr. 

^ AsHBURTON Place, 

William n. Davenport c. . 

VEiVPORT, Secretary. ^ BOSTON. 



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Public Document 



No. 57 



TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board. 



For the Year 1912. 



y 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT «& POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1913. 



w^ 



2)^ 



\f\\ ^ Approved by 

\ The State Board of Publication. 




'^ 



CONTENTS. 



II. 
III. 



IV. 



VI. 



(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 
(7) 
(8) 



(9) 
(10) 
(11) 
(12) 



(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 
(7) 



Organization and Administration, 

(1) Board, Ofl&cers and Employes, 

(2) Offices and Buildings, 
Metropolitan Water District, . 
Metropolitan Water Works — Construction, 

(1) Distribution System, 

(a) New Pumping Engine at Chestnut Hill, 

(b) Supply of Water to Hyde Park, 

(2) Acquisition of Lands and Settlements for Damages, 
Water Works — Maintenance, 

(1) Operation of Works, 
Storage Reservoirs, 
Aqueducts, 

Distributing Reservoirs, 
Pumping Stations, . 
Pipe Lines, 

Clinton Sewerage Works, 
Protection of the Water Supply, 

(a) Drainage Ditches, . 

(6) Filter-beds, . 

(c) Sanitary Inspection and Policing, 

(d) Laboratory Examinations, 
Quality of the Water, 
Forestry and Moth Suppression, 
Electrolysis, .... 
Wachusett Power Plant, 

Water Works — Financial Statement, 

(1) Metropolitan Water Loans, Receipts and Payments, 
Issues of Metropolitan Water Loan Bonds, 
Metropohtan Water Loan Sinking Fund, . 
Annual Assessments and Receipts, . 

Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of District and to Water 
Expenditures for the Different Works, 
Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan Water Act, 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 

(6) Receipts, .... 

(c) Assets, . . . . . 

(d) Liabilities, .... 
Metropohtan Sewerage Works, 

(1) North Metropohtan Sewerage System — Construction, 

(a) New Mystic Sewer, ..... 

(6) New Screening Works at East Boston Pumping Station 

(c) Siphon under Metropolitan Sewer in East Boston, 

(2) South Metropohtan Sewerage System — Construction, 

(3) Acquisition of Land and Settlements, 



Companies 



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IV 



CONTENTS. 



VI. Metropolitan Sewerage Works — Concluded. 

(4) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance, 

(a) Sewers and Pumping Stations, 

(6) Tanneries and Gelatine and Glue Works, 

(5) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance, 

Sewers and Pumping Stations, 
VII. Sewerage Works — Financial Statement, 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments 

(o) North Metropolitan System, . 
(6) South Metropolitan System, . 

(2) Issues of Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Bonds, . 

(3) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund, 

(4) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures, 

(5) Annual Assessments, 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works, 

(7) Detailed Financial Statement, 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 
(6) Receipts, 

(c) Assets, . 

(d) Liabilities, 
VIII. Rainfall and Water Supply, 

IX. Consumption, 
X. Recommendations for Legislation, 
XI. Future Work, 



PAGE 

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Report of Chief Engineer of Water Works, 
General Statement, 
Organization, 
Construction, 

Hyde Park Pumping Station, 
Pumping Engine for Southern High Service District, 
Miscellaneous, 
Maintenance, 

Rainfall and Yield, 
Storage Reservoirs, 

Wachusett Reservoir, 

Wachusett Dam and Grounds, 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3, 

Ashland Reservoir, . 
• Hopkinton Reservoir, 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Farm Pond, . 

Lake Cochituate, 
Sources from which Water for the Supply 
Aqueducts, . 

Wachusett, 

Sudbury, 

Cochituate, 

Weston, 

Improvement of Sanitary Conditions 
Pumping Stations, 

Chestnut Hill, 

Spot Pond, 

Arlington, 

West Roxbury, 
Consumption of Water, 

Metering of Service Pipes, 
Water supplied Outside the Metropolitan District, 
Quality of Water, ..... 



of the Metropolitan District has been 



on Sudbury and Cochituate Aqueducts, 



taken. 



67 
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72 
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CONTENTS. 



Report of Chief Engineer of Water Works — Concluded 
Maintenance — Concluded. 
Sanitary Inspection, 
Swamp Ditches and Brooks, . 
Protection of the Supply by Filtration, 
Forestry, .... 
Distributing Reservoirs, 

Weston Reservoir, . 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, . 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 

Forbes HUl Reservoir and Standpipe, 

Mystic Reservoir, .... 

Mystic Lake and Pumping Station, . 

Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs 

Chelsea Reservoir, . 
Pipe Yards, .... 
Pipe Lines, .... 

Mystic Tunnel Extension, 

Fox Hill Bridge over Saugus River, . 

Connection between Boston and Aletropol 

Miscellaneous, 
Meters, .... 

Electrolysis, .... 
CUnton Sewerage, . 
Hydro-electric Power Station, 
Miscellaneous, 
Engineering, 



tan Mains 



at Milton Lower 



Mills 



FAGB 



106 
111 

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Report of Engineer of Sewerage Works, .... 

Organization, ........ 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, ..... 

Areas and Populations, ...... 

Metropolitan Sewers, ....... 

Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections, 
Pumping Stations and Pumpage, .... 

Construction, ........ 

North MetropoUtan System, ..... 

New Mystic Sewer, ..... 

Screening Machinery at East Boston Pumping Station 
Addition to the Screen-house Building, 
Siphon at Saratoga Street, East Boston, 
Maintenance, ...... 

Scope of Work and Force employed, 
Grade Crossing at Medford Street, Somerville, Fitchbiu"g 
Maine Railroad, .... 

Grade Crossing at Orient Heights, Boston, Revere Beach 
Boilers and Economizers at Charlestown Station, 
Dredging at East Boston Pumping Station Wharf, 
Painting, ........ 

Drainage from Tanneries, Gelatine and Glue Works 
Stoneham, ..... 

Pumping Stations, .... 

Capacity and Results, 

North MetropoUtan System, 

Deer Island Pumping Station, 
East Boston Pumping Station, 
Charlestown Pumping Station, 
Alewife Brook Pumping Station, 



Division 
& Lynn 



of the Boston & 
Railroad, 



Winchester, Woburn and 



132 
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147 



VI 



CONTEXTS. 



Report of Engineer of Sewerage Works — Concluded. 
Maintenance — Concluded. 

Pumping Stations — Concluded. 

Capacity and results — Concluded. 
South Metropolitan System, 

Ward Street Pumping Station, 
Quincy Pumping Station, . 
Nut Island Screen-house, 
Quincy Sewage Lifting Station, 
Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls, 
Material Intercepted at the Screens, 



PAGE 



148 
148 
149 
151 
151 
153 
153 



Appendix No. 1. - 

Appendix No. 2. - 
Table No. 1. 

Table No. 2. 

Table No. 3. 

Table No. 4. 

Table No. 5. 

Table No. 6. 

Table No. 7. 

Table No. 8. 

Table No. 9. 

Table No. 10. 

Table No. 11. 

Table No. 12. 

Table No. 13. 

Table No. 14. 

Table No. 15. 

Table No. 16. 

Table No. 17. 

Table No. 18. 

Table No. 19. 

Table No. 20. 

Table No. 21. 

Table No. 22. 

Table No. 23. 

Table No. 24. 



— Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Works made and pending dur- 

ing the year 1912, . . . . . . . 

— Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, 

— Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1912, 

— Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1912, ..... 

— Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1912, .... 

— Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1912, . 

— Rainfall in Inches on the Wachusett Watershed, 1897 to 1912, 

— Rainfall in Inches on the Sudbury Watershed, 1875 to 1912, . 

— Yield of the Wachusett Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile 

from 1897 to 1912, 

— Yield of the Sudbury Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile from 

1875 to 1912 

— Wachusett System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1912 

— Sudbury System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 

1912, 

— Cochituate System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1912 

— Elevations of Water Surfaces of Reservoirs above Boston City Base at the 

Beginning of Each Month, ........ 

— Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been drawn for the 

Supply of the Metropolitan Water District, . 

— Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 1912 by 

months, ............ 

— Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 1 and 2 at Chestnut Hill Pump- 

ing Station No. 1 for the Year 1912, 

— Statement of Operation of Engine No. 3 at Chestnut Hill Pumping Station 

No. 1 for the Year 1912 182 

— Statement of Operation of Engine No. 4 at Chestnut HiU Pumping Station 

No. 1 for the Year 1912, . . . . . . . . . 

— Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 5, 6, and 7 at Chestnut Hill 

Pumping Station No. 2 for the Year 1912, 

— Statement of Operation of Engine No. 12 at Chestnut Hill Pumping 

Station No. 2 for the Year 1912 

— Statement of Operation of Engine No. 8 at Spot Poijd Pumping Station 

for the Year 1912, 

— Statement of Operation of Engine No. 9 at Spot Pond Pumping Station 

for the Year 1912 

— Statement of Operation of Engine No. 10 at Arlington Pumping Station 

for the Year 1912, 

— Statement of Operation of Engine No. 11 at Arlington Pumping Station 

for the Year 191^, 

— (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns 

supplied by the MetropoUtan Water Works 190 



156 

161 

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167 

169 
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181 



183 



184 



185 



186 



187 



188 



189 



CONTENTS. vii 



Appendix No. 2 — Concluded. ] 

Table No. 25. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water from the Low-service j 

System 190 I 

Table No. 26. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water from the High-service ' 

and Extra High-service Systems, ....... 191 ' 

Table No. 27. — Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns supplied from ' 

Metropolitan Works, as measured by Venturi Meters in 1912, . . 192 ; 
Table No. 28. — (Pump Basis) Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan Water District, 

as constituted in the Year 1912, and a Small Section of the Town of I 

Saugus, from 1893 to 1912 195 ; 

Table No. 29. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton, 197 

Table No. 30. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury Reservoir, , . 198 j 

Table No. 31. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, Stoneham, . . 199 \ 

Table No. 32. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochituate, . . , 200 ' 

Table No. 33. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at the State House, Boston, 201 ] 

Table No. 34. — Averages of Examinations of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 1 

Water Works in 1912, 202 1 

Table No. 35. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, from 1892 to ; 

1912 203 J 

Table No. 36. — Microscopic Organisms in Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan ! 

Water Works, from 1898 to 1912, inclusive, 204 ] 

Table No. 37. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Various Parts of ' 

the Metropolitan Water Works, from 1898 to 1912, inclusive, . . 206 J 

Table No. 38. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works in * 

1912 206 j 

Table No. 39. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water i 

Works in 1912 207 

Table No. 40. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan Water { 

Works in 1912, 208 j 

Table No. 41. — Table showing Length of Main Lines of Water Pipes and Connections ' 

owned and operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, and j 

Number of Valves set in Same, Dec. 31, 1912 209 i 

Table No. 42. — Statement of Cast-iron Hydrant, Blow-off and Drain Pipes, owned and I 

operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, Dec. 31, 1912, . 210 • 
Table No. 43. — Length of Water Pipes, Four Inches in Diameter and Larger, in the Several 

Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 31, < 

1912 211 

Table No. 44. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities 

and Towns suppUed by the Metropolitan Water Works, . . . 212 
Table No. 45. — Average Maximum Monthly Heights, in Feet, above Boston City Base, to 

which Water rose at Different Stations on the Metropolitan Water Works i 

in 1912 213 

Appendix No. 3. — Water Works Statistics for the Year 1912, 215 , 

Appendix No. 4. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, made and pending | 

during the year 1912 218 

Appendix No. 5. — Tables relating to Metropolitan Sewerage Works, 223 ; 

Table No. 1. — North System. — Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers with Public and 

Special Connections, . . . . . . . * . . . 223 

Table No. 2. — South System. — Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers with Public and 

Special Connections, .......... 225 ] 

Table No. 3. — North System. — Cities and Towns delivering Sewage; Approximate ] 
Miles of Sewer connected; Estimated Populations and Areas contributing ^ 
and to contribute with Ratios of such Populations and Areas, . . 226 j 
Table No. 4. — South System. — Cities and Towns delivering Sewage; Approximate j 
Miles of Sewer connected. Estimated Populations and Areas contributing i 
and to contribute with Ratios of such Populations and Areas, . . 227 ■ 
Appendix No. 6. — Financial Statement presented to the General Court on Jan. 8, 1913, . 228 ^ 
Appendix No. 7. — Legislation of the Year 1912 affecting the Metropolitan Water and Sewer- 
age Board 233 



viii CONTENTS. 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

PAGE 

Hyde Park Pumping Station . . Frontispiece 

Mystic River Tunnel Extension — Sinking Shaft at Charlestown End of Tunnel, ... 12 
Mystic River Tunnel Extension — Heading in Rock in Tunnel under the River, ... 12 
Wachusett Reservoir — White Pines near South Dike in Boylston, 7 Years Old — 1909, . . 17 

Wachusett Reservoir — White Pines near South Dike in Boylston, 10 Years Old — 1912, . 18 

Diagram sho'WTng Comparative Amounts of Water collected in the Different Years on the Sud- 
bury and Wachusett Watersheds per Square Mile of Watershed, ..... 58 
Diagram showing Average Rate of Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan District in 1912 

during the Entire Day and between the Hours of 1 and 4 at Night, . . . .60 

Diagram showing Average Rate of Consumption in Metropolitan Water District and Rainfall 

and Average Temperature of Air at Chestnut Hill Reservoir for Each Week during 1912, , 102 



Meteopolitan Watee and Seweeage Boaed. 



To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts in General Court assembled. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, established under 
the provisions of chapter 168 of the Acts of the year 1901, has 
already presented to your Honorable Body an abstract of the account 
of its doings, receipts, expenditures, disbursements, assets and liabil- 
ities for the fiscal year ending on ^N'ovember 30^ 1912, and now, in 
accordance with the provisions of chapter 235 of the Acts of the 
year 1906, it presents a detailed statement of its doings for the cal- 
endar year ending on December 31, 1912, being its 

TWELFTH AiSTNUAL REPORT 

made since the consolidation of the Metropolitan Water Board and 
the Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners on March 20, 
1901. 

I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 
(1) Board, Officers ai^d Employes. 

The term of office of Henry H. Sprague expired on March 21, 
1912, and he was reappointed for the three years next succeeding. 
The membership of the Board has consequently remained as in the 
preceding year: Henry H. Sprague, chairman, Henry P. Walcott, 
M.D., and James A. Bailey, Junior. William ^. Davenport has 
continued as secretary and in charge of the auditing department. 
Alfred F. Bridgman has been the purchasing agent and Miss Alice 
G. Mason the bookkeeper. 

There are also employed in the administrative office a paymaster, 
an assistant in auditing, two general clerks, three stenographers and 
clerks, a telephone operator, a messenger, and a janitor with two 
assistants, one of whom acts as watchman. 



2 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Such general conveyancing work and investigation of real estate 
titles in the different counties as has been called for during the year 
has been performed by George D. Bigelow and Miss Celia M. Tib- 
betts. 

The consulting engineers of the Board are Hiram F. Mills and 
Frederic P. Stearns, who are called upon for services when matters 
arise which require such consideration. 

Dexter Brackett, Chief Engineer of the Water Works, has had 
supervision over the various departments of both construction and 
maintenance of the Water Works. William E. Foss has been Assist- 
ant to the Chief Engineer and has exercised a general charge over 
engineering work in all departments. The following have also acted 
under the direction of the Chief Engineer: Elliot R. B. Allardice, 
Superintendent of the Wachusett Department; Charles E. Haber- 
stroh, Superintendent of the Sudbury and Cochituate Works and of 
the portion of the Weston Aqueduct above the Weston Reservoir; 
Samuel E. Killam, Superintendent in charge of the Weston Reservoir 
and the remaining portion of the Weston Aqueduct, and of all reser- 
voirs and pipe lines within the Metropolitan District; and Arthur 
E. O'iN'eil, Superintendent of the several pumping stations. 

There has been a still further decrease in the number of the engi- 
neering force during the past year. The average force employed 
on construction and maintenance during the year has included, in 
addition to the Chief Engineer, 4 department superintendents, 2 
division engineers, 6 assistant engineers, and 33 others in various 
engineering capacities and as sanitary inspectors, clerks, stenogra- 
phers and messengers, the total force numbering 46. The maximum 
engineering force employed at any one time during the year on both 
construction and maintenance was 49. 

A maintenance force in addition to those engaged in engineering 
capacities, as above mentioned, numbering upon the average during 
the year 236, has been required at the pumping stations, upon reser- 
voirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, and upon minor construction work. At 
the end of the year this force numbered 215. 

William M. Brown resigned the position of Chief Engineer of 
Sewerage Works on February 21, 1912, to accept the position of 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 3 

Chief Engineer of the Passaic Vallej Sewerage Commissioners. The 
Board, in recognition of his services, caused the following entry to 
be made upon its records : — 

In regretfully accepting the resignation of William M. Brown, the Chief 
Engineer of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, the Board gratefully recog- 
nizes the great indebtedness which is due to him from the Commonwealth. 
From the beginning he took part in the construction of the Sewerage Works, 
and in the year 1895 was appointed the Chief Engineer of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Commission; upon the consolidation of the Boards in 1901 he con- 
tinued at the head of the Sewerage Division; and he has in these periods 
directed the construction of the larger part of the works which now constitute 
the North and South Metropolitan Sewerage systems. His service of more 
than sixteen years in charge of the building and operation of these systems 
has displayed a large constructive ability and an intimate knowledge of the 
details of maintenance. Faithful devotion and prompt execution and accom- 
plishment have characterized the performance of all his duties. 

Frederick D. Smith was, on February 28, 1912, appointed as 
Engineer in charge of both construction and maintenance of the 
works. Mr. Smith has been assisted by Henry T. Stiff, Division 
Engineer in charge of the office and drafting, by 2 assistant engi- 
neers and by 10 others employed in different engineering capacities, 
and by 2 clerks and stenographers. 

The maximum engineering force employed at any one time during 
the year on the construction and maintenance of the Sewerage W^orks 
was 16. 

The regular maintenance force required in addition for the opera- 
tion of the pumping stations, the care and inspection of the sewers, 
and for other parts of the Sewerage Works, exclusive of the engineers 
and day-labor forces, has upon the average numbered 170. 

The whole regular force of the Sewerage Department at the end 
of the year numbered 186, of whom the Engineer and 15 assistants 
and draftsmen were engaged in general upon the works, and of the 
remainder, 103 were employed upon the Xorth System and 67 upon 
the South System. 

The day-labor forces under the supervision of the engineers and 
the immediate direction of the foremen have been employed during 
the year in connection with the extension of the East Boston pumping 
station and its equipment, and in the construction of a siphon at 



4 ]^IETROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Saratoga Street, East Boston, under the Metropolitan sewer, for the 
City of Boston. 

The maximum number of men employed upon contracts and upon 
day-labor construction on the Sewerage Works during the year was 
for the week ending October 30, when the number amounted to 86. 



(2) Offices and Buildings. 

The offices of the Board and the secretary, and of the auditing and 
conveyancing departments, and the main engineering offices of both- 
Water Works and Sewerage Works, are located in the buildings num- 
bered 1 and 3 Ashburton Place, at the corner of Somerset Street, in 
Boston. 

The headquarters of the Wachusett Department of the Water 
Works are at the gate and power house at the Wachusett Dam, in 
Clinton. The branch office for the Sudbury Department is main- 
tained at South Framingham. Headquarters of the maintenance 
force of the Water Works for the northern part of the Metropolitan 
District are maintained in the Glenwood pipe yard in Medford, 
where there are offices, shops, store-rooms and stables ; and the main- 
tenance force for the southern part of the District has headquarters 
in like buildings at the Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

Branch headquarters of the maintenance and repair forces of the 
Sewerage Works are maintained for the ^Korth Metropolitan System 
at the stable and locker building at East Boston and at the Deer 
Island pumping station, and for the South Metropolitan System at 
the Ward Street pumping station and at the storage yard at Hough's 
K'eck. 

n. METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. 

The Metropolitan Water District now comprises the cities of Bos- 
ton, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, ^N'ewton, Quincy 
and Somerville, and the towns of Arlington, Belmont, Lexington, 
Milton, Nahant, Revere, Stoneham, Swampscott, Watertown and 
Winthrop, — in all 9 cities and 10 towns. The District has an area 
of 174.8 square miles, no additional municipalities having been ad- 
mitted into the District during the year. Its population, according 
to the United States Census taken for April 1, 1910, was 1,070,256. 
The population of the District on July 1, 1912, the date upon which 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 5 

calculations for the Water Works are based, was estimated as 
1,127,210. 

The city of Newton, though belonging to the District, did not 
take water from Metropolitan sources during the year 1912. 

III. METROPOLITAN WATER WORKS — CONSTRUCTION. 

The total amount expended for the construction and acquisition of 
the Metropolitan Water Works since the passage of the Metropolitan 
Water Act in the year 1895 has been $42,036,311.97. 

The total amount expended during the calendar year on account 
of the construction and acquisition of works has been $103,461.53. 
There has been expended on account of the Wachusett power plant 
the sum of $6,955.31 ; in the laying of the new 60-inch main for 
bringing the supply of water from the Weston Aqueduct into the 
Metropolitan District, the sum of $13,319.97 ; on account of the 
new pumping engine which has been installed at Chestnut Hill 
pumping station for the use of the southern high-service district, $14,- 
093.20 ; in the laying of a new main to Hyde Park and on account 
of the construction of a new pumping station, the sum of $57,- 
426.14; and for other minor works, engineering and administration 
expenses, the remaining sum of $11,666.91. 

(1) DiSTEiBUTiox System. 
(a) New Pumping Engine at Chestnut Hill. 
The new pumping engine for the southern high service had been 
put in operation in the preceding year, but the official duty trial was 
not made until October 16 and 17, 1912. The test which was made 
showed that the engine fulfilled the various requirements of the speci- 
fications and is capable of pumping 40,000,000 gallons of water per 
day with a lift of 130 feet. The engine has been accepted. The cost 
of the engine proper has been $99,769, but the additional sums paid 
for the engine foundations, providing new boilers and making the nec- 
essary connections and for incidental expenses, carry the entire cost of 
the work to $148,265.44, for which the estimate made was $150,000. 

{h) Supply of Water to Hyde Parle. 
The district of Hyde Park, now a part of Boston, was in the pre- 
ceding year connected with the Metropolitan main running through 



6 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Forest Hills, and the Board began the supply of water to the district 
on February 6, 1912. 

The foundation of the new pumping station to be erected on Hyde 
Park Avenue was also begun in the preceding year, and the super- 
structure has been erected and, with the exception of some painting 
and plumbing, has been entirely completed. The walls of the build- 
ing are red-faced brick with granite trimmings. The main engine 
room is 60 feet long and 43 feet wide, and the boiler room in the 
rear is 38 feet by 40 feet. A side track has been built and connected 
with the railroad, so arranged as to provide for the convenient deliv- 
ering of coal and other supplies. Two pumping engines have been 
completed and at the end of the year their installation in the station 
was in progress, each engine having a capacity of pumping 3,000,000 
gallons of water per day, with a lift of 140 feet. It is expected that 
the building will be entirely completed, the grounds graded, and the 
engines ready for operation in the early part of the year 1913. 

The sum of $100,013.74 was expended for the laying of the pipe 
lines to connect the district of Hyde Park with the Metropolitan 
main, and for the pumping station, engines and equipment the 
expenditures have thus far amounted to $63,971.77. The total sum 
required for the Avork will be within the estimated cost of $212,000. 

(2) Acquisition of Lands and Settlements for Damages. 

The only additional land acquired during the past year was a pur- 
chase in Chelsea, for the pipe tunnel to East Boston, of 0.0324 of an 
acre in fee, and an easement in 0.0299 of an acre. 

The Board conveyed back, in settlement, a parcel of 0.0514 of an 
acre in l^ewton which it had taken in connection with the construc- 
tion of the tunnel for the Weston Aqueduct Supply Main, and 
granted an easement over 0.042 of an acre of land which it had before 
taken. 

The settlements made during the year on account of land botJi 
purchased and taken have numbered 3. The total amount paid in 
settlements was $1,605. All of these settlements were eifected by 
voluntary agreement. 

There have been 4 takings of land in fee, including a total of 
179.874 acres, to all but one parcel of which title by deed had pre- 
viously been acquired. 

The following is a list of the takings made during the year for the 
Water Works : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



Takings for Metropolitan Water Works for the Year 1912. 



No. 



Location and Description. 



Former Owner. 



Re- 
corded. 



Purpose of Taking. 



143 



144 



145 



146 



Newton, — Land adjoining south- 
easterly side of Cochituate Aque- 
duct location. Area, fee in 0.133 of 
an acre. 

West Boylston, — Ten parcels of land 
on Prescott Street, Sterling Street, 
Pleasant Street, along Boston & 
Maine Railroad and Waushacum 
Brook. Area, fee in 126.97 acres. 

Natick, — Four parcels of land adja- 
cent to lands in which the right, 
title and interest of the City of Bos- 
ton therein were taken by the Com- 
monwealth on January 1, 1898. 
Area, fee in 0.638 of an acre. 



Sterling, West Boylston, Clinton and 
Boylston, — Nine parcels of land, 
three of which are in Sterling, two 
partly in Sterling and partly in West 
Boj'lston, one in West Boylston, 
one in Clinton and two in Boylston. 
Area, fee in 51.896 acres. 



Charles G. Rice. 



Frank H. Baldwin and 
Lena Leazott. 



Augustus J. Wilder, 
Sylvester H. Frost, 
Maggie M. Porter, 
Edward E. and Di- 
ana B. Wilgus, 
Trustees of William 
A. Prescott, and 
Elizabeth F. Hand. 

Herbert C. Fisher, 
Tennis Dugas, 

Louisa Dugas, Bur- 
ton W. Potter, Clar- 
ence R. Streeter, 
Carrie L. Bates, Cle- 
phane L. and Ellen 
A. Lord. 



1912. 

Feb. 21. 



Mar. 15. 



Mar. 14. 



Apr. 1, 



Weston Aqueduct Sup- 
ply Mains. 



Improvement of Wachu- 
sett watershed. 



Improvement of Cochit- 
uate watershed. 



Improvement of Wachu* 
sett watershed. 



IV. WATER WORKS — MAINTENANCE. 

(1) Operation of Works. 
The maintenance and operation of the Metropolitan Water Works 
during the past calendar year has required the expenditure of $450,- 
551.83. This amount, however, includes the sum of $50,795.42 
expended on the Mystic tunnel extension on the account of the City 
of Boston, for which the city has already reimbursed the Common- 
wealth to the extent of $46,213.28. 



(2) Storage Reservoirs. 
The reservoirs which are maintained for the collection and storage 
of water in the various watersheds, and from which is drawn through 
the different aqueducts the water for distribution to the various mu- 
nicipalities in the District, are capable of holding in storage a total 
of 80,908,900,000 gallons. At the beginning of the year the quan- 
tity in storage was about two-thirds of the entire capacity. The 
smallest amount in storage at any time during the year was on 
February 20, when the reservoirs contained 59,064,200,000 gallons, 
but there was a constant gain until about the middle of May, when 



8 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

all the reservoirs were filled. They remained full until the end of 
the first week in June ; after that date there was a constant loss, more 
or less rapid, until the end of the year, when the amount in storage 
was 64,220,100,000 gallons. The year closed, therefore, with a net 
gain during the year of 4,240,100,000 gallons. The capacities of 
the various reservoirs are as follows : — 

Capacity 
in Gallons. 

Coebituate watershed : — 
Lake Cochitiiate, including Dudley Pond, Natick, Framing- 
ham and Wayland, 2,328,300,000 

Sudbury watershed : — 
Sudbury Reservoir, Soutbborough and Marl- 
borough, 7,253,500,000 

Framingham Reservoir No. 1, Framingham, 
Framingham Reservoir No. 2, Ashland and 

Framingham, 529,900,000 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3, Framingham, 1,180,000,000 
Ashland Reservoir, Ashland, .... 1,416,400,000 
Hopkinton Reservoir, Hopkinton and Ash- 
land, 1,520,900,000 

Whitehall Reservoir, Hopkinton, . . . 1,256,900,000 
Farm Pond, Framingham, .... 167,500,000 

13,612,600,000 

Wachusett watershed : — 
Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton, Boylston, West Boylston and 

Sterling, 64,968,000,000 

Total, . 80,908,900,000 

The water in the Wachusett Reservoir reached high-water mark on 
May 15, and for the period following May 17 until June 22 some 
water Avas allowed to flow through the waste channel into the river 
below the dam. At the end of the year the water surface was 11.21 
feet below high-water mark, or 1.49 feet higher than at the beginning 
of the year. 

Since the reservoir was filled the action of the waves has caused 
a constant wearing away of the shores, especially in places where 
there w^ere steep banks composed of fine material. 5y this caving in 
of the shores the area of the reservoir has been increased to the extent 
of about 14.5 acres, requiring in each year considerable additional 
stripping of the soil back of the immediate shore, various reinforce- 
ments and the repair of paving and riprap. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 9 

The action of heat and cold and of the frost upon the granolithic 
surface of the top of the Wachusett Dam and upon the joints of the 
parapet wall, and in the masonry on the up-stream face of the dam, 
has been such as to require considerable attention and repair. 

The Sudbury Reservoir, which receives the water from the Wachu- 
sett Aqueduct and from which the water is discharged into the Wes- 
ton Aqueduct and into Framingham Reservoir No. 3, and Framing- 
ham Reservoir No. 3, from which water is discharged into the Sud- 
bury Aqueduct, have been both kept nearly full during the year. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 2 was kept full, and during the early 
part of the year water was drawn from it for the Metropolitan 
supply. 

It has not been found necessary during the past year to draw 
for the supply of the Metropolitan District from the waters of Fram- 
ingham Reservoir No. 1, Farm Pond, Ashland and Hopkinton res- 
ervoirs and Whitehall Pond, but water has been discharged from 
both Framingham Reservoir No. 1 and Framingham Reservoir No. 
2 into Farm Pond, from which the town of Framingham has taken 
the most of its supply during the year. 

Water was drawn from Lake Cochituate during portions of Feb- 
ruary, June, August, September, October and November, in the ag- 
gregate a little more than one and a half billion gallons, equivalent 
to a daily average supply of 4,211,000 gallons. 

(3) Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct was in service for the passage of the water 
from the Wachusett Reservoir to the Sudbury Reservoir during por- 
tions of 292 days in the year, and the quantity of water flowing 
through the aqueduct was equal to an average of 92,127,000 gallons 
per day for the entire year. The drawing of the water from the 
reservoir into the aqueduct was to a considerable extent governed 
by the requirements of the power station. 

For distribution to the cities and towns of the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict water was drawn through the Sudbury Aqueduct during por- 
tions of 353 days, the use of the aqueduct having been interrupted 
for periods of a few days each on account of the repairs upon the 
aqueduct where passing over Echo Bridge. The daily average for 
the whole year flowing through the Sudbury Aqueduct was 74,221,- 
000 gallons, the average of 72,115,000 gallons being drawn from 



10 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Framingham Reservoir jSTo. 3 and of 2,100,000 gallons from Fram- 
ingham Reservoir No. 2. 

Owing to cracks in the aqueduct which had developed at the cross- 
ing at Echo Bridge, and were causing a considerable leakage, it was 
deemed necessary to line with lead the bottom and sides of the aque- 
duct at this point. The work was rendered more difficult on account 
of the impossibility of stopping the flow through the aqueduct except 
for short periods. The lining was accomplished for a distance of 
508 feet at a cost of $5,537.70. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was in operation during 100 days of the 
year and the quantity conveyed was equal to 4,211,000 gallons per 
day for the entire year. 

The Weston Aqueduct was in use throughout the year except for 
portions of two days when its use was discontinued for the purpose 
of making some repairs at Siphon chambers ISTos. 1 and 2. The 
daily average flow through the aqueduct was 36,632,000 gallons. 



(4) Distributing Reservoies. 

Beside the various storage reservoirs there are located within the 
Metropolitan Water District various distributing reservoirs and 
standpipes which not only furnish a considerable amount of water 
in storage, but serve also as a protection and relief in case of accident 
and emergency, and are serviceable in securing a proper distribution 
of the water in the District. 

These distributing reservoirs and standpipes are as follows : — 



Spot Pond, Stoneham and Medford, . . . . 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Brighton district of Boston, 

Weston Reservoir, Weston, 

Fells Reservoir, Stoneham, 

Mystic Reservoir, Medford, 

Waban Hill Reservoir, Newton, 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, Quincy, . 

Bear Hill Reservoir, Stoneham, . 

Arlington Standpipe, Arlington, 

Forbes Hill Standpipe, Quincy, 



Capacity 
in Gallons. 

1,791,700,000 

300,000,000 

200,000,000 

41,400,000 

26,200,000 

13,500,000 

5,100,000 

2,450,000 

550,000 

330,000 



Total, 2,381,230,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



11 



It has been felt desirable that the grounds about the distributing 
reservoirs, being situated within the populated portions of the Dis- 
trict and attractive from their natural positions, should be well 
cared for. Several of these are places of much resort in the summer. 
The Board has not been disposed to restrain the public from the 
benefit of the grounds, and considerable care and policing has been 
required in order to prot-ect them and the water supply from injury 
and enforce a proper- enjoyment of them. 



(5) Pumping Stations. 

During the past year 69 per cent, of all the water furnished for 
distribution to the Metropolitan District was pumped at the two 
Chestnut Hill stations, and the remainder of the water, 31 per cent, 
of the whole, was distributed by gravity. This proportion was con- 
siderably greater than that of last year, when only 27 per cent, was 
delivered by gravity. Other pumping has been required for supply- 
ing the higher portions of the District at the Spot Pond, Arlington 
and West Roxbury stations. 

The average quantity pumped per day at the Chestnut Hill sta- 
tions was 80,002,000 gallons, at the Spot Pond station 8,030,000 
gallons, at the Arlington station 876,000 gallons, and at the W^est 
Roxbury station 833,000 gallons, a total of 89,741,000 gallons per 
day. 

The following are the several pumping stations : — 



Number of 
Engines. 



Contract 

Capacity per 

Dav 

(Gallons). 



Lift 
(Feet). 



Chestnut Hill High-service Station, . 
Chestnut Hill Low-service Station, . 
Chestnut Hill Low-service Station, . 
Spot Pond Station, , . . 

Arlington Station, .... 
West Roxbury Station, 



66,000,000 

105,000,000 

40,000,000 

30,000,000 

3,000,000 

3,750,000 



138 
60 
130 
125 
290 
140 



The cost of operating all the stations, counting the coal actually 
consumed, was $105,038.22, or $3,198 per million gallons pumped. 
The increase of $0,224 above the cost in the preceding year is owing 
to the larger cost of fuel and to the considerable repairs required. 



12 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The total amount of coal purchased during the year was 8,650.76 
gross tons, of which 7,983.02 tons were bituminous, 411.74 tons an- 
thracite, 38.84 tons buckwheat anthracite and 217.16 tons anthracite 
screenings. The average cost of bituminous coal delivered in the 
bins at the various stations varied from $3.91 to $4.67; the average 
cost of anthracite coal was $5.38; the cost of buckwheat was $2.86; 
and the average cost of anthracite screenings varied from $2.50 to 
$3.08. 

The various requirements regarding the number of thermal units, 
the percentage of volatile matter and the percentage of ash and 
moisture under which the coal was purchased by contract proved 
satisfactory, and the coal which was furnished by the various con- 
tractors was of good quality. 

(6) Pipe Lines. 

The Board has owned and operated during the past year pipe lines 
of a total length of 101.73 miles, a length of only 0.15 of a mile hav- 
ing been added during the year. The local m^ins of 4 inches and 
more in diameter with which the Metropolitan mains are connected 
for the distribution of water to the various municipalities of the 
District have a total length of 1,745.9 miles. 

The only serious break during the year occurred on February 13 
on Adams Street in Milton, in the 24-inch main supplying Milton 
and Quincy. One pipe was split for nearly its entire length, appar- 
ently by reason of its having settled upon the brick masonry of a 
sewer which had been constructed subsequent to the laying of the 
pipe. Owing to the depth to which the ground was frozen the work 
of repair was rendered difficult, and special efforts had to be made 
in order to continue the supply to the districts dependent upon it 
while the repairs were in progress. There were 39 leaks of a minor 
character, the larger portion of which occurred at defective joints, 
both the w^ooden and leaded joints. 

The widening of the north channel in the Mystic River between 
Charlestowm and Chelsea by the City of Boston made necessary the 
extension of the tunnel which carries the 24-inch Metropolitan water 
main under the bed of the river. As the work required processes of 
much difficulty involving the excavation of rock and quicksand, and 
the use of compressed air, it was deemed wiser that it should be done 
by day labor under the direction of the Board. Accordingly arrange- 




MYSTIC RIVER TUNNEL EXTENSION -Sinking Shaft at Charlestown 

End of Tunnel. 




MYSTIC RIVER TUNNEL EXTENSION - Heading in Rock in Tunnel 

under the River. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 13 

ment was made with the City by which the entire work should be 
carried out by the Board and the City should pay the expense. 

The new tunnel is ^ built in general of brick carried for a distance 
of 273 feet, with an interior diameter of 6 feet, and its centre line is 
about 4314 feet below mean low water. The tunnel was finished and 
the new pipe line was put into operation in December. The entire 
cost of the work as charged to December 31, 1912, was $55,059.15, 
$50,795.42 of which is to be paid by the city of Boston, and $4,- 
263.73 is properly chargeable to the Board. 

The Legislature of 1911 directed the County Commissioners of 
Essex County to reconstruct the Fox Hill Bridge over the Saugus 
River between the city of Lynn and the town of Saugus. As the 
Metropolitan 16-inch water main supplying Swampscott and ^Nahant 
is laid in the river channel at and in connection with the old bridge, 
the construction of the new bridge requires a change in the water 
main. The work of building the new bridge was undertaken in the 
past season and a water pipe has been laid for the time being on the 
temporary bridge. So far the bridge construction has proceeded 
very slowly, and it will be impossible to place the water pipe in its 
permanent location until the completion of the bridge in the coming 
season. The expense of the changes was imposed by statute upon the 
Metropolitan Water District. 

(7) Clinton Sewerage Works. 

Wires for transmitting electric energy have been carried from the 
power station at the Wachusett Dam to the Clinton Sewerage Station 
and an electric pump and motor installed at the station, so that for 
the last two months electric energy has been substituted for steam 
for pumping the sewage upon the filter-beds. The cost of the new 
equipment has been $7,625.29. It is expected not only that the work 
of pumping will be more satisfactorily performed, but that there will 
be a considerable saving in expense. 

The amount of sewage received was more than 25 per cent, in 
excess of the quantity contributed by the town in the preceding year. 
This large increase seems to be due to the leaky condition of the town 
sewers. 

The average quantity of sewage pumped per day was 1,057,000 
gallons. The total cost of operating the station was $3,988.44, or 



14 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

$10.31 per million gallons pumped, the increase of cost over that of 
last year being chiefly on account of labor and fuel. 

There has been a constant improvement in tlje effluent from the fil- 
ter-beds since the year 1909, when extensive improvements v^ere 
made, and the results of the past year have been the best attained 
since the beginning of the operation of the works. 

The total cost of maintenance of the filter-beds has been $4,176.60, 
an increase over that of last year, but the cost per million gallons 
treated has decreased from $12.63 to $10.80. 

(8) Protection of the Water Supply. 

Xo additional general improvements have been completed during 
the past year for the protection of the water in the different water- 
sheds from pollution, but investigations have been made and arrange- 
ments effected with the purpose of undertaking such improvements 
in the coming year. 

There has been a recent growth in the manufacturing industries 
in both the Cochituate and Wachusett watersheds. The starting up 
of old mills and the building of new ones has largely increased the 
disposal of manufacturing wastes, and the growth of the industries 
has caused the erection of many new buildings for dwelling and 
other purposes as well as the re-occupancy of old premises. 

A considerable district in the southern part of the town of Fram- 
ingham has been developed by the erection of buildings for manu- 
facturing and dwelling purposes, including especially a very low 
area tributary to Beaver Dam Brook. Much of this area is so low 
that it is difficult to dispose of the sewage satisfactorily by cesspools 
or other means usually adopted. It is necessary so far as possible to 
extend the town's system of sewers into this region. 

The Board included in its estimates for the year 1912, upon the 
basis of which the appropriation of that year was made by the Legis- 
lature, the sum of $20,000 for the protection and improvement of 
the water supply, with the expectation that this amount would be 
largely devoted to remedying troubles which existed upon the por- 
tion of the Cochituate watershed which was included in the tovni of 
Framingham. The Board under this appropriation entered into an 
engagement with the town of Framingham by which the Common- 
wealth should contribute to the building of sewers in progress and 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 15 

projected, the town itself having appropriated larger sums for the 
purpose. The operations contemplated have not yet been carried out 
but it is expected that they will be prosecuted or completed in the 
coming year. 

A better disposal and purification of sewage and manufacturing 
wastes from dwellings and factories in portions of the Wachusett 
watershed seem also to be called for in the early future, and inves- 
tigations have been instituted with reference to the making of definite 
recommendations. The Board has accordingly included in its esti- 
mates for the current year the further special sum of $20,000 for 
the protection and improvement of the water supply, with the expec- 
tation that if the appropriation is made the larger portion of this 
sum may be devoted to the better care of the manufacturing wastes 
and of the sewage of the town of Holden entering the Quinepoxet 
River near its outlet into the Wachusett Reservoir. 

(a) Drainage Ditches. 

The various drainage ditches which have been constructed to an 
aggregate length of 36.36 miles have required at least annual clean- 
ing and various repairs and in some places renewals. Paved ditch- 
ing has been introduced in places into brooks which were feeders of 
the water supply. 

(&) Filter-heds. 

The Marlborough Brook filter-beds which receive the storm water 
from the more thickly settled portions of the city of Marlborough 
have been in general adequate for the filtration of the waters re- 
ceived, there having been overflows of comparatively small quantities 
on only three days in the year. 

The filter-beds which receive for filtration the water flowing through 
the village of Sterling, before entering the reservoir, as well as the 
smaller filter-beds which receive the drainage from Sterling Junction, 
the Worcester County Training School at West Boylston, and from 
the swimming pool at Southborough, have all been in successful oper- 
ation and required only the usual attention. 

The Pegan Brook pumping station, from which is pumped upon 
the filter-beds the drainage from thickly settled portions of the town 
of JSTatick before its entrance into Lake Cochituate, was in operation 
199 days in the year and with the exception of a few hours in two 
different days there was no overflow from the storage basin. 



16 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(c) Sanitary Inspection and Policing, 

Constant inspection of the watersheds is required and maintained 
not only by the Sanitary Inspector and his assistants but also by 
members of the maintenance forces. 

Surveillance is kept over all premises which are subject to condi- 
tions which may render them injurious or menacing to the water 
supply. During the past year examination has been made of 1,546 
premises on the Wachusett watershed and of 7,459 premises on the 
Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds, and reports have been made 
thereon with reference to cesspools, privy, sink and barn drainage, 
manufacturing wastes and sewer connections. In the larger part of 
the cases found " unsatisfactory ", remedy, at least temporary, has 
been effected, and though the number of premises calling for exami- 
nation has considerably increased, there has been a decided reduction 
in the number of unsatisfactory cases. 

It has been necessary to employ special watchmen and police, espe- 
cially on Sundays and holidays and in the camping and bathing 
season, in addition to the sanitary forces, to enforce the laws and 
regulations of the Board for the protection of the water supply. 
There have been several prosecutions on account of bathing, and 
there have been a few violations of the regulations of the Board on 
account of hunting on the Commonwealth's lands and of fishing in 

places prohibited by the rules. 

« 

{d) Laboratory Examinations. 
Water is drawn for consumption in the District from time to time 
from the different sources of supply according to the results obtained 
from the examinations made in the laboratories of the State Board of 
Health and of this Board. Chemical examinations of the various 
waters used were made in 408 cases by the State Board, and there 
were in addition 2,441 microscopical and 1,335 bacterial examina- 
tions made in the laboratory of this Board. By means of these exam- 
inations not only the better waters are furnished to the District but 
immediate measures may be taken to remedy any troubles which 
are found to exist. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 17 

(9) Quality of the Water. 
The quality of the water which has been supplied to the Metropoli- 
tan District during the past year has been at least equal to that fur- 
nished in recent years. The conditions attending the yield of the 
water were such that the Board was enabled to draw about four-fifths 
of the entire supply from the Wachusett Reservoir, leaving only 
about one-fifth to be taken from the Sudbury and Cochituate sources. 
On account of the large proportion thus supplied from the Wachu- 
sett Reservoir the color of the water was considerably improved. 
There were the usual number of microscopical organisms present in 
the w^ater aff'ecting at times its taste or odor, but these did not occur 
in sufficient numbers to make the water objectionable or occasion 
any special complaint. 

(10) Forestry a^s^d Moth Suppression. 

The only nursery now maintained by the Board in connection with 
the Wachusett department is that at Oakdale, which contains white 
pine seedlings from one to three years old to a number exceeding 
220,000. The nursery established in Southborough for the Sudbury 
department contains upward of 70,000 three-year old white pine 
seedlings. 

Little additional planting was done during the year, the older 
nurseries having ceased on account of exhaustion to yield proper 
seedlings and the new seedlings obtained from the State Forester 
not having reached a sufficient age for planting. 

There was less than the usual damage by forest fires upon the 
watersheds. The only two considerable fires were near the Wachu- 
sett Reservoir, one burning over about 9.5 acres in Boylston and 
destroying 4,300 young white pines, and another extending over 27.7 
acres in West Boylston and Sterling and destroying 10,000 white 
pines. 

The ravages of the gypsy and brown-tail moths and of the elm-leaf 
beetle have somewhat abated during the past year within the Metro- 
politan District, but the lands of the Board about the Cochituate 
and Sudbury reservoirs in Framingham and Southborough and 
around the Wachusett Reservoir have suffered more severely. Paint- 
ing the egg clusters of the gypsy moth with creosote and burning 
the nests of the brown-tail moths, and extensive spraying of the trees 
on account of moths and elm-leaf beetles have been resorted to. 



18 :\IETROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The shoots of the white pine trees infested with the pine-tree 
weevil have been cut off and burned. The injury effected by the 
weevil seems to have been less than that caused in preceding years. 

A careful inspection has been made of the chestnut trees upon the 
lands of the Commonwealth on account of the spread of the chestnut 
bark disease. The investigations made indicate that the disease has 
extended more or less over the larger part of the growth of chestnut 
trees upon the lands of the Board. There are certain areas in Boyls- 
ton, West Boylston and Sterling which have been especially affected, 
and the ravages have been so great as to destroy a considerable por- 
tion of the trees and to threaten the life of those which remain. The 
Board has begun to cut down the trees in the regions most infested^ 
as there seems to be no means of staying the progress of the dis- 
ease, and so far no remedy has been discovered to prevent the ex- 
tending of the scourge which threatens the destruction of the en- 
tire chestnut growth. If the ravages continue it seems that it will 
be necessary to do extensive cutting wherever the chestnut trees are 
found. The cutting of the wood involves very considerable expendi- 
tures, but the larger part if not all will be returned in the sale of 
lumber and wood. 

The work so far accomplished has been performed by the regular 
forces of the departments and has proceeded with a view of deter- 
mining what more extended action shall be expedient in the future. 

(11) Electrolysis. 

The investigations which have been made during the past year 
indicate that in general there has been little change in the conditions 
relative to electrolytic action upon the pipe systems. A largely in- 
creased current of electricity has, however, been found flowing on 
the Metropolitan mains between Maiden and Chelsea, and in Cam- 
bridge and Medford between the Fitchburg Railroad and Spot Pond. 

The 24-inch pipe which was laid in the old tunnel under the Mystic 
River between Charlestown and Chelsea was found to be so badly 
affected by electrolysis that new pipes had to be substituted. The 
24-inch line in Broadway in Chelsea, near the power station of the 
Bay State Street Railway Company, has so suffered from the elec- 
trolytic action that it seems necessary to relay a portion of the line 
in this locality during the coming season. 




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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 19 

(12) Wachusett Power Plaxt. 

The hydro-electric power station at the Wachusett Dam has 
generated and furnished power to the Connecticut River Transmis- 
sion Company under the contract during the entire year. The ma- 
chinery was in active operation on 261 days, and for a considerable 
portion of the time power has been furnished in excess of the mini- 
mum amount which the contract required should be taken by the 
Company. The operation of the plant has been entirely successful, 
and it has furnished electric energy to the Transmission Company 
equivalent in amount to an average of 2,937 horse power per 10-hour 
day on the 261 days that the plant was in operation. 

Since the middle of October a small quantity of the electric energy 
generated has been transmitted to the Clinton sewerage pumping 
station for the purpose of supplying power for the lifting of the 
sewage at this station. 

The cost of operating the power station has been $8,995.66, and the 
Commonwealth has received from the Connecticut River Transmis- 
sion Company for the energy supplied a total of $30,297.95. 

V. WATER WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, disbursements, assets and 
liabilities of the Board for the State fiscal year, beginning with De- 
cember 1, 1911, and ending with November 30, 1912, was, in accord- 
ance with the requirements of chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 
1906, presented to the General Court in January last, and a copy of 
this financial abstract is printed as Appendix 'No. 6., 

The more detailed statement of its doings required by said chap- 
ter for the calendar year 1912, in relation to the Metropolitan Water 
Works, is herewith presented. 

The Metropolitan Water Loans authorized for the construction and 
acquisition of works have amounted to $42,690,000. To this sum 
are added the proceeds from the sale of property by the. Board, and 
these amounted on January 1, 1913, to $310,836.14. The total 
amount, therefore, which the Board has been authorized to expend is 
$43,000,836.14. The amount of expenditures approved by the Board 
for payment out of the Metropolitan Water Loan Eund was, for the 
year 1912, $103,461.53, and the total amount so approved for pay- 
ment since the beginning of the work up to January 1, 1913, has 



20 :METR0P0LITAX water [Pub. Doc. 

been $42,036,311.97. There was accordingly a balance remaining 
at the beginning of the year 1913 amounting to $964,524.17. 

The Treasurer of the Commonwealth has issued from time to time, 
on the request of the Board, bonds to the amount of $41,788,000. 
Of this $41,398,000 were sinking fimd bonds and were issued for 
terms of thirty-nine and one-half and forty years from date of issue, 
and bear interest at the rate of 3 and 3% per cent, per annum. The 
remainder of the bonds, amounting to $390,000, were issued on the 
serial payment plan, bonds being payable each year for a period of 
thirty-nine years and bearing interest at the rate of 314 per cent, per 
annum. 

The sinking fund established for the payment of the sinking fund 
bonds at maturity amounted on January 1, 1913, to $9,829,356.80. 

The net increase in the debt during the calendar year, as repre- 
sented by the Metropolitan Water Loans outstanding, was $45,000, 
bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the amount of $5,000 hav- 
ing been paid. The increase of the sinking fund for the payment of 
the debt at maturity was, during the same period, $875,919.36. 
There has been, therefore,' a decrease in the net debt during the cal- 
endar year amounting to $830,919.36. 

The amount approved by the Board for the maintenance and oper- 
ation of the Water Works for the year 1912 was $450,551.83. This 
amount includes the sum of $50,795.42 expended for the Mystic 
Tunnel Extension, for which the city of Boston reimburses the Com- 
monwealth, and on account of which the sum of $46,213.28 was 
paid by the city to the Treasurer of the Commonwealth during the 
past year to the credit of the Maintenance Eund. 

The assessments for the year 1912 for the payment of interest on 
the bonds, for the sinking fund requirements and for the expenses 
of operation and maintenance of the Water Works, which were levied 
upon the various cities and towns in the Metropolitan District, 
amounted to $2,289,490.68. 

(1) Metropolitan Water Loans, Receipts and Payments. 
The loans authorized for the construction and acquisition of the 
Metropolitan Water Works, the receipts which are added to the pro- 
ceeds of these loans, the expenditures for the construction and acqui- 
sition of works, and the balance available on January 1, 1913, have 
been as follows : — 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 21 

Loans authorized under acts prior to 1911, . $41,878,000 00 

Loan under chapter 464 of the Acts of 1911, 
for the extension of the Southern High 
Service, 212,000 00 

Loan under chapter 694 of th-e Acts of 1912, 
for purchase of Fisher Hill Reservoir and 
other property of the City of Boston, . . 600,000 00 

$42,690,000 00 



Receijjts from the sales of property applicable 
to the constiniction and acquisition of 
works : — 

For the year ending December 31, 1912, . $11,979 43 
For the period prior to January 1, 1912, . 208,856 71 



$220,836 14 



Receipt from town of Swampseott for admis- 
sion to the Metropolitan Water District paid 
into Loan Fund (St. 1909, c. 320), . . 90,000 00 



310,836 14 



$43,000,836 14 



Amount approved by the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board for payments out of the 
Water Loan Fund : — 

For the year ending December 31, 1912, . $103,461 53 
For the period prior to January 1, 1912, . 41,932,850 44 



42,036,311 97 

Balance January 1, 1913, $964,524 17 

(2) Issues of Metropolitan Water Loan Bonds. 

The Treasurer of the Commonwealth, under authority given him 
to issue from time to time, on request of the Board, negotiable bonds 
to an amount not exceeding $42,690,000 to be designated the " Metro- 
politan Water Loan ", has sold bonds to the amount of $41,788,000. 
The bonds sold prior to 1911, amounting to $41,398,000, were sink- 
ing fund bonds. A list of these bonds sold is given in the 9th and 
10th Annual Reports. The bonds sold in the years 1911 and 1912 
were serial bonds, amounting to $390,000, and bearing interest at 
31^) per cent, per annum, as follows: — 



22 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Date of Sale. 


Amount 

of Bonds 

sold. 


Price 
received. 


Premiums. 


Date Due. 


Jan. 30, 1911 

Jan. 29, 1912, .... 


$200,000 
190,000 


SlOO 036 
100 349 


$72 00 
663 10 


$5,000 each year, Jan. 1, 1912, 
to Jan. 1, 1951, inclusive. 

$5,000 each year, Jan. 1, 1913, 
to Jan. 1, 1946, inclusive. 

$4,000 each year, Jan. 1, 1946, 
to Jan. 1, 1951, inclusive. 



The bonds amounting to $140,000, stated in the 11th Annual Re- 
port as sold on Aug. 4 and 17, 1911, were temporary loans. The 
sale on Jan. 29, 1912, of bonds to the amount of $190,000 included 
provision for the payment of the temporary loans of $140,000. 

Prior to May 1, 1906, all premiums received from the sales of 
bonds were applied to the payment of the current charges in reduc- 
tion of the annual assessments, but since that date, under the pro- 
visions of chapter 337, Acts of 1906, they have been paid into the 
sinking fund. 



(3) Metkopolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund. 
The sinking fund established by the Treasurer of the Common- 
wealth has amounted at the end of each year to sums as follows : — 



December 31, 1895, 


. $226,286 05 


December 31, 1904, 


. $3,519,602 92 


December 31, 1896, 


699,860 70 


December 31, 1905, 


. 4,207,045 69 


December 31, 1897, . 


954,469 00 


December 31, 1906, 


. 4,897,822 62 


December 31, 1898, 


1,416,374 29 


December 31, 1907, 


. 5,643,575 69 


December 31, 1899, 


1,349,332 97 


December 31, 1908, 


. 6,419,283 28 


December 31, 1900, 


1,573,619 72 


December 31, 1909, 


. 7,226,262 31 


December 31, 1901, 


1,662,426 95 


December 31, 1910, 


. 8,089,902 91 


December 31, 1902, . 


2,256,803 81 


December 31, 1911, 


. 8,953,437 44 


December 31, 1903, . 


2,877,835 59 


December 31, 1912, 


. 9,829,356 80 



(4) Annual Assessments and Receipts. 
Assessments for the year 1912 amounting to $2,289,490.68 were 
required for the payment of the interest on the bonds issued by the 
Commonwealth, the sinking fund requirements and the expenses of 
operation and maintenance of the Water Works. The requirements 
were, for interest, $1,429,570.72; for the sinking fund, $512,884; 
for serial bonds, $9,336.90, and for maintenance and operation, 
$337,699.06. These assessments were made by the Treasurer of the 
Commonwealth upon the various municipalities as follows: — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



23 



Arlington, . 






$18,996 13 


Newton, 


$6,274 75 


Belmont, 






8,591 38 


Quincy, 


54,558 24 


Boston, 






1,792,123 83 


Revere, 


27,919 08 


Chelsea, 






48,658 68 


Somerville, . 


109,232 14 


Everett, 






47,338 81 


Stoneham, . 


10,019 69 


Lexington, 






8,173 66 


Swampscott, 


10,814 10 


Maiden, 






43,833 54 


Watertown, . 


18,600 53 


Medford, 






27,130 03 


Winthrop, . 


14,150 34 


Melrose, 






20,978 01 








Milton, 






16,312 53 




$2,289,490 68 


Nahant, 






5,784 61 







The comparatively small sum assessed upon the city of Newton 
was owing to the fact that this municipality has not reached the safe 
capacity of its own sources of water supply and has not as yet been 
furnished with water. 

The proceeds from the operations of the Board, exclusive of the 
proceeds from sales of property and of water, are required by statute 
to be applied to the payment of the interest, the sinking fund re- 
quirements and expenses of maintenance and operation of works. 
These for the year 1912 amounted to $88,035.37. 

(5) SuppLYiis'G Water to Cities and Towxs outside of Dis- 
trict AND TO Water Companies. 

Sums have been received during the year 1912 under the provi- 
sions of the Metropolitan Water Act, for water furnished, as fol- 
lows : — 

Town of Framingham, . . . $1,418 30 

Town of Revere (on account of water furnished to a portion of 

the town of Saugus for 1911), 250 00 

United States Government (for Peddoek's Island), . . . 2,572 91 

Town of Wakefield, 3,060 51 

Westborough State Hospital, 1,848 45 



$9,150 17 



The sums so received prior to March 23, 1907, were annually 
distributed among the cities and towns of the District, but since that 
date, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 238 of the Acts 
of 1907, the sums so received have been paid into the sinking fund. 



24 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(6) Expenditures for the Different Works. 
The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works : — 



CONSTBTJCTION AND ACQUISITION OF WORKS. 



Administration applicable to all parts of the con- 
struction and acquisition of the works, . 
Wachusett Dam and Reservoir: — 

Wachusett Dam, 

Power plant, 

Power house floor, 

North Dike, 

South Dike, 

Removal of soil 

Relocation of railroads, 

Roads and bridges, 

Real estate, 

Damages, real estate not taken, business and 
loss of wages 

Other expenses, 



Improving Wachusett watershed, 
Wachusett Aqueduct, 
Sudbury Reservoir, 
Protection of Sudbury supply. 
Improving Sudbury watershed. 
Protection of Cochituate supply, 
Improving Cochituate watershed, 
Improving Lake Cochituate, . 
Pipe lines, Dam No. 3 to Dam No. 1, 
Pijw line, Rosemary siphon, . 
Weston Aqueduct: — 

Aqueduct, .... 

Reservoir, .... 

Real estate, taxes and other expenses, 



Distribution system : — 
Low service: — 
New 48-inch main, Section 31, . 
Section 38, Tunnel (East Boston main), . 

Pipw lines and connections 

Pumping station, Chestnut Hill, 

Reservoir, Spot Pond 

Gate-house and connections. Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir, ....... 

Real estate and other expenses, 

Amounts carried forward, 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 



S4,188 43 



$6,954 91 
40 



126 50 



7,081 81 

79 60 

6 00 



$2 40 

6 08 



1,253 00 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1912. 





$298,515 30 


$2,378,206 05 




113,786 61 




8,169 18 




792,264 68 




137,075 55 




2,536,612 66 




881,872 45 




547,867 76 




3,240,398 41 




532,247 07 




8,547 92 
11,177,048 34 



$2,353,820 11 
289,001 82 
206,668 18 



235,714 32 

1,797,948 85 

2,923,152 96 

129,190 36 

95,711 84 

9,0C0 00 

8,860 68 

104,141 29 

48,471 48 

23,142 98 



2,849,490 11 



$162,698 06 
48,708 06 

1,795,169 83 
462,572 19 
582,188 73 

65,480 88 
94,191 97 



$1,261 48 $11,355 84 $3,211,009 72 $19,700,388 51 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



25 



Construction and Acquisition of Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1912. 



Amourits brought forward, . 

Distribution system — Con. 

Northern high service: — 
Pipe lines and connections, 
Spot Pond pumping station, . 
Fells Reservoir, Stoneham, 
Bear Hill Reservoir, Stoneham, 
Real estate and other expenses, 

Southern high service: — 
Pipe lines and connections. 
Section 39 (Hyde Park connection), 
Pumping station. Chestnut Hill, 
Forbes Hill Reservoir, Quincy, 
Waban Hill Reservoir, Newton, 
Real estate and other expenses. 

Northern extra high service. 

Southern extra high service: — 
Pil>e lines and connections, 
Hyde Park connection, 
Section 40, ... . 
Section 41, . 

Hyde Park Pumping Station, 
Real estate and other expenses, 

Weston Aqueduct supply mains, 

Meters and connections, 

Improving Spot Pond Brook, 

Glenwood pipe yard, . 

Chestnut Hill pipe yard, 



Stock — pipes, valves, castings, etc., purchased 
and sent first to storage yards, and later trans- 
ferred, as needed, to the various parts of the 
work: — 

Amount received, 

Transferred from storage yards to the various 
sections of the work and included in costs of 
special works, 



Diversion of water. South Branch of Nashua 

River,! 

Acquisition of existing water works: — 
Reimbursement city of Boston, partially con- 
structed Reservoir, ...... 

Boston water works, taken January 1, 1898, 

Amounts carried forward, 



1,261 48 $11,355 84 



5 00 



5 88 

3,766 76 

14,093 20 



5 35 



$3,211,009 72 $19,700,388 51 



528,444 86 

291,829 35 

141,392 94 

38,267 70 

14,838 05 

526,725 37 
52,526 39 

382,662 61 
90,003 49 
61,592 11 
10,226 36 

101,898 59 

22,887 16 



745 64 




30,699 12 




2,067 69 




16,788 23 




49,580 45 




56,938 99 




10 25 




7,103 20 




13,319 97 




1,043,335 47 




538 54 




90,199 41 




- 




3,991 23 




- 




33,100 59 




- 


85,400 21 


11,311 26 


6,767,772 20 



$6,812 50 



107 02 



6,705 48 



$103,461 53 



$2,544,928 69 



2,400,678 72 



144,249 97 



1,363,935 31 



$1,157,921 59 
12,768,948 80 



$13,926,870 39 $27,976,345 99 



1 Of the total expenditures from the beginning of the work, the sum of $150,939. 
sewerage system. 



is for Clinton 



26 



:metropolitan water 



[Pub. Doc. 



Construction and Acquisition of Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1912. 



ATTiounts brought forward, 



Acquisition of existing water works — Con. 

Spot Pond taken from Maiden, Medford and 
Melrose, 

Waban Hill Reservoir purchased from Newton, 

Expenses : — 

Engineering $22,617 52 

Conveyancing, 3,862 92 

Legal, expert and court, . . . 46,648 03 



Deduct following, transferred and charged to 
special works: — 

Reimbursement city of Boston, 
transferred to Sudbury Reser- 
voir, $1,157,921 59 

Waban Hill Reservoir transferred 
to Distribution Department, . 60,000 00 

Stock — pipes, engines, etc., in- 
cluded with Boston Water 
Works and transferred to Dis- 
tribution Department, . . 22,340 91 



Total for construction and acquisition of works, 



$103,461 53 



$13,926,870 39 $27,976,345 99 



1,240,229 62 
60,000 00 



$15,300,228 48 



$103,461 53 



73,128 47 



1,240,262 50 



14,059,965 98 



$42,036,311 97 



Maintenance and Operation. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 


Administration, 
General supervision, . 
Taxes and other expenses, 
Wachusett Reservoir Department: — 

Superintendence, . 

Reservoir 

Forestry, .... 

Protection of supply. 

Buildings and grounds, . 

Wachusett Dam, 

Wachusett Aqueduct, 

Clinton sewerage system : — 
Pumping station, 
Electric plant. 
Sewers, screens and filter-beds, . 




















$15,050 89 
32,955 20 
38,733 79 

$10,936 78 
8,447 59 
9,000 68 
2,445 31 
3,307 72 
4,402 26 
4,726 51 

3,954 13 
6,653 52 
4,361 85 


Amounts carried fortoard, . 




















$58,236 35 $86,739 88 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



27 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 



Amounts brought forufard 

Wacbusett Reservoir Department — Con. 

Sanitary inspection 

Swamp drainage 

Power plant 

Sudbury Department: — 

Superintendence, Framingham office, 

Ashland Reservoir, 

Hopkinton Reservoir, 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3, . 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Lake Cochituate, 

Marlborough Brook filters 

Pegan filters, 

Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds 

Sanitary inspection 

Cochituate Aqueduct, 

Sudbury Aqueduct 

Weston Aqueduct, 

Improving Lake Cochituate, 

Distribution Department: — 

Superintendence, 

Arlington pumping station, pumping service. 

Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, pumping service. 

Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, pumping service, 

Spot Pond pumping station, pumping service, 

West Roxbury pumping station, pumping service, 

Hyde Park pumping station, pumping service, . 

Arlington standpipe 

Bear Hill Reservoir, 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir and grounds 

Fells Reservoir, 

Forbes Hill Reservoir 

Mystic Lake, conduit and pumping station. 

Mystic Reservoir, 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 

Weston Reservoir, . . 

Spot Pond 

Buildings at Spot Pond, 

Pipe lines: — 

Low service, 

Northern high service, 

Northern extra high service, 

Southern high service, 

Southern extra high service 

Supply pipe lines, 

Amounts carried forward, ..... 



158,236 35 



918 59 
3,182 58 
5,902 30 



$10,154 13 
1,461 15 
1,372 46 

420 01 
5,903 23 
6,644 21 
4,860 05 
2,870 76 
3,446 51 

921 25 

3,105 18 

4,489 31 

13,074 12 

5,716 80 

324 86 



$4,026 97 

8,246 69 

41,635 90 

30,819 87 

15.607 68 
6,936 28 

5 00 

497 73 

108 04 

9,769 31 

716 95 

1,604 29 

1,179 98 

925 09 

169 25 

2,664 37 

6,706 21 

340 00 

64.608 39 
6,908 43 

204 79 

6,534 81 

324 78 

1,338 51 



$86,739 88 



68,239 82 



64,764 03 



$211,879 32 $219,743 73 



28 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 



Aynounts brought forward. 



Distribution Department — Con. 
Buildings at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, . 

Chestnut Hill pipe yard, 

Glenwood pipe yard and buildings, 

Stables, 

Waste prevention, 

Venturi meters 

Measurement of water, 

Arlington pumping station, buildings and grounds, 



Total for maintaining and operating works, 



$211,879 32 $219,743 73 



1,390 11 
1,511 84 
3,632 90 
9,012 97 
3 OU 
1,168 32 
1,924 65 
284 99 



230,808 10 



$450,551 83 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan 

Water Act. 

The Board herewitli presents, in accordance with the requirements 
of the Metropolitan Water Act, a detailed statement of the expendi- 
tures and disbursements, receipts, assets and liabilities for the year 
1932. 

{a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 

The total amount of the expenditures and disbursements on ac- 
count of construction and acquisition of works for the year beginning 
January 1, 1912, and ending December 31, 1912, is $103,461.53, 
and the total amount from the time of the organization of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1912, is 
$42,036,311.97. 

For maintenance and operation the expenditures for the year, in- 
cluding $50,795.42 expended for the Mystic Tunnel Extension, for 
which the City of Boston reimburses the Commonwealth, have been 
$450,551.83. 

The salaries of the commissioners, and the other expenses of admin- 
istration, have been apportioned to the construction of the works and 
to the maintenance and operation of the same, and appear under each 
of those headings. 

The following is a division of the expenditures according to their 
general character : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



29 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1912. 



Construction of Works and Acquisition by 
Purchase or Taking, 

Administration. 
Commissioners, 
Secretary and auditor, 
Clerks and stenographers. 
Legal services, . 
Traveling, 

Stationery and printing. 
Postage, express and telegrams. 
Furniture and fixtures, . 
Alterations and repairs of buildings, 
Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of 

building, . 
Rent and taxes, main office, 
Miscellaneous expenses, . 



Engineering . 
Chief engineer and department engineers. 
Principal assistant engineers, . 
Engineering assistants, . 
Consulting engineers. 
Inspectors, .... 
Architects, .... 
Railroad and street car travel. 
Wagon hire, .... 
Stationery and printing. 
Postage, express and telegrams. 
Engineering and drafting instruments and tools. 
Engineering and drafting supplies. 
Books, maps and photographic supplies. 

Furniture and fixtures, 

Alterations and repairs of buildings: — 

Main office, 

Sub-offices 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of 
buildings: — 

Main office, 

Sub-offices 

Rent and taxes, main office, . 

Rent of sub-offices and other buildings. 

Field offices and sheds, . 

Clinton office building, . 

Unclassified supplies. 

Miscellaneous expenses, . 



Amounts carried forward, 



1,916 66 


375 00 


1,115 00 


340 69 


51 00 



19 30 



199 23 


169 20 


2 35 


$841 90 


990 31 


5,092 15 



1,488 50 



72 28 
15 00 

63 69 
14 02 



57 91 



597 76 
23 65 

507 60 



99 05 





$125,060 24 




51,717 03 




65,457 21 




2,359 00 




3,712 87 




14,040 91 




3,108 17 




4,289 59 




5,810 86 




12,400 50 




5,936 89 




4,622 03 


$4,188 43 


$''09 'il'i ^0 






$208,390 18 




164,475 95 




1,063,677 74 




26,135 07 




310,234 70 




36,161 19 




27,751 20 




45,337 53 




27,093 40 




7,746 00 




19,533 88 




25,168 62 




7,181 34 




14,980 11 




14,169 00 




2,939 36 




27,868 11 




19,694 47 




17,579 15 




4,526 74 




1,274 49 




9,866 87 




8,264 87 




9,489 30 


9,863 82 


" OQQ "139 '>! 




$14,052 25 


$2,398,054 57 



30 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1912. 


Amounts brought forward, 


. 


$14,052 25 




52;398,054 57 


Construction. 










Preliminary work (borings, teat pits and other 










investigations): — 










Advertising, 


$56 80 




$6,806 77 


• 


Other preliminary work as given in detail in 










preceding annual report 


- 


56 80 


155,530 89 


162,337 66 








Contracts, Wachusett Reservoir: — 










Contracts completed and final payments made 










prior to January 1, 1912, 


- 




$5,427,800 13 




McBride & Co., Stillwater improvement, . 


- 




i, 23,314 67 




Sundry bills paid under this contract, 


- 




3,552 11 




For Power Plant: — 










S. Morgan Smith Co., hydro-electric plant, 


$6,850 00 


6,850 00 


68,389 62 


5,523,056 53 








Contracts completed, improving Wachusett Water- 










shed, 




- 




11,893 75 


Contracts completed, Wachusett Aqueduct, . 




- 




1.447.208 55 


Contracts completed, Sudbury Reservoir, 




- 




1,545,028 33 






- 




9.000 00 


Contraqts completed, improving Lake Cochituate, 




- 




60,657 45 


Contracts completed, protection Cochituate supply , 




- 




9,000 00 


Contracts completed, Rosemary siphon, 




- 




5,916 96 


Contracts completed, pipe line. Dam No. 3 to 










Dam No. 1, 




- 




17,240 22 


Contracts completed, Clinton sewerage system, . 




- 




66,878 22 


Contracts completed, Weston Aqueduct, 




- 




2,376,004 54 


Contracts, Distriljution System: — 










Contracts completed and final payments made 










prior to January 1, 1912 


- 




$5,091,828 58 




Cavanagh Bros., layitig water pipes on Sect. 6, 










Weston Aqueduct supply mains, 


$200 00 




40,777 77 




Andrew M. Cusack, laying water pipes on Sect. 










41, southern extra high service. 


1,023 28 




4,778 68 




Pratt & Cady Co., water valves. 


1,396 85 




5,000 00 




Robb Eng. Co., Ltd., boilers for Hyde Park 










pumping station, 


1,711 00 




1,711 00 




Michael Russo & Son, for laying water pipes on 










Sect. 39, southern high service. 


2,715 55 




16,298 85 




Warren Foundry and Machine Co., cast-iron 










pipes and special castings, . . ' . 


4,763 28 




4,763 28 




Camoia & Williams, laying water pipes on Sect. 










33, northern high service, 


- 




14,721 27 




De Vincenzi & Baruffoldi, laying water pipes on 










Sect. 36, northern extra high service. 


- 




3,233 31 




Joseph Hanreddy, laying water pipes on Sect. 7, 










Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, 


12,406 19 




114,462 13 




Amounts carried forward, 


$24,216 15 


$20,959 05 


$5,297,574 87 $13,632,276 78 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



31 



General Character of Expenditures. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1912. 


Amounts brotight forward, .... 


$24,216 15 $20,959 05 


$5,297,574 87 $13,632,276 78 


Construction — Con. 






Contracts, Distribution System — Con. 






Holly Manufacturing Co., pumping engine for 






Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, 


13,000 00 


98,000 00 


Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon Co., for fiu"nishing two 






pumping engines for Hyde Park pumping 






station, 


5,176 50 


5,176 50 


A. Varnerin Co., for building the superstructure 






of Hyde Park pumping station, 


17,331 63 

en ynA op 


17,331 63 




oy,<^» Zo 


$5,418,083 00 


Deduct value of pipes, valves, etc., included in 






above list, transferred to maintenance account 






December 31, 1900, 


— 


3,139 77 






Additional work: — 






Labor 


$10,141 95 


$838,954 70 


Professional services, medical services, analyses 






etc., 


4 00 


4,512 74 


Traveling, 


42 


2,815 85 


Rent, 


20 00 


4,342 22 


Water rates, 


- 


1,454 77 


Freight and express, 


31 82 


14,531 99 


Jobbing and repairing, .... 


10 25 


10,460 22 


Tools, machinery, appliances and hardware 




• 


supplies, 


628 18 


90,729 62 


Electrical supplies, 


32 48 


7,356 34 


Castings, ironwork and metals, . 


1,876 15 


93,217 84 


Iron pipe and valves, 


1,243 49 


81,558 27 


Blasting supplies, 


- 


1,950 15 


Paint and coating, 


- 


5,471 98 


Fuel, oil and waste, 


- 


12,66L 35 


Lumber and field buildings, 


418 31 


92,091 46 


Drain pipe, 


37 07 


9,594 23 


Brick, cement and stone 


1,674 41 


36,966 81 


Sand, gravel and filling, .... 


582 35 


9,089 18 


Municipal and corporation work, 


3,901 71 


224,712 05 


Police service, 


- 


210,801 74 


Sanitary inspection, 


- 


13,107 09 


Judgments and settlements for damages, , 


- 


53,124 26 


Unclassified supplies, 


76 01 


19,099 42 


Miscellaneous expenses 


165 78 


7,718 34 




on qiA oq 


1 QAO. 900 CO 


Legal and expert: — 


£i\J,0'a oO 


1,040,0^^ D^ 


Legal services, 


- 


$4,668 82 


Expert services, 


- 


1,862 66 


Court expenses, 


- 


1,317 20 


Miscellaneous expenses, .... 


- 


185 80 








Amounts carried forward, .... 


. $101,527 71 


$20,901,577 11 



32 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1912. 


Amounts brought forward 


$101,527 71 


$20,901,577 11 


Real Estate. 






Legal and expert: — 






Legal services, 


- 


$4,736 31 


Conveyancer and assistants, 










$109 00 


110,970 97 


Experts, .... 










80 00 


18,088 93 


Appraisers, . 












100 00 


22,507 75 


Court expenses, , 












- 


11,139 43 


Counsel expenses. 












- 


43 25 


Conveyancing supplies. 












4 50 


3,198 03 


Conveyancing expenses. 












'35 32 


6,052 61 


Miscellaneous expenses. 












- 


4,334 15 


Settlements made by Board, 












1,605 00 


3,441,264 10 


Judgments, 












- 


170,716 24 


Taxes and tax equivalents. 












- 


68,182 41 


Care and disposal, . 












- 


86,901 14 




1 MO on 


nAQ iqs oo 








Damages to Real Estate not taken, to Business and 






on Account of Loss of Wages. 






Legal and expert : — 






Legal services, 


- 


$1,130 67 


Expert services, 


- 


2,857 62 


Court expenses 


- 


15,394 34 


Miscellaneous expenses, 


- 


125 00 


Settlements, , . ' 


- 


415,513 65 


Judgments, 




116,733 42 

"I'll T^i 7n 






OOlfiO^ i\J 


Claims on Account of Diversion of Water. 






Legal and expert: — 






Legal services, 


- 


$3,774 98 


Expert services, 


- 


19,339 69 


Court expenses, 


- 


20,775 49 


Miscellaneous expenses, . . 


- 


1.289 58 


Settlements 


- 


917,350 00 


Judgments, 


- 


220,969 67 

1 iqo tnn A] 


Purchase of Existing Water Works. 




lflO0,^V\J tL 


Legal and expert: — 






Legal services, 


- 


$1,878 89 


Expert services. 












- 


13,569 82 


Court expenses. 












- 


29,728 38 


Miscellaneous expenses, 












- 


1,470 94 


Settlements and judgments, 












- 


15,227,100 01 






It "7^ 7m Oi 


Relocation Central Massachusetts Railroad. 




i.t/|^ 1 V) 1 lO Kf'X 


Settlements 


- 


177,597 39 


Total amount of construct 


ion e 


xpen 


ditur 


es. 




. $103,461 53 


$42,036,311 97 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



33 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 



Maintenance and Operation of Works, 
Adnainistration: — 
Commissioners, 
Secretary and assistants, 
Rent, 

Repairs of building, 
Fuel, 
Lighting, 
Care of building, 
Postage, . 

Printing, stationery and office supplies. 
Telephones, 
Traveling expenses. 
Miscellaneous expenses, 



General supervision : — 
Chief engineer and assistants. 

Rent, 

Repairs of building. 

Fuel, 

Lighting, 

Care of building, .... 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies 

Telephones 

Traveling expenses, 
Miscellaneous expenses, . 



Pumping service: — 
Labor, 
Fuel, 

Oil, waste and packing. 
Repairs, . 
Small supplies, 
Rent, 



Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds: — 

Superintendents, 

Engineering assistants, ....... 

Sanitary inspectors, 

Labor, pay roll, 

Labor, miscellaneous, 

Alterations and repairs of pumping stations. 

Alterations and repairs of other buildings and structures. 

Automobiles, 

Brick 

Amounts carried forward, 



$5,833 34 

6,099 34 

578 09 

75 01 

68 02 

55 93 

422 89 

206 00 

1,498 87 

81 82 

90 78 

73 14 



$26,394 63 

1,734 31 

428 66 

204 08 

167 79 

1,268 82 

49 00 

587 94 

336 05 

707 07 

1,076 85 



$61,204 07 

35,092 26 

1,320 74 

3,322 17 

1,537 91 

774 27 



$9,310 00 

10,584 49 

3,269 79 

168,360 40 

4,151 30 

853 26 

2,385 87 

7,823 82 

1,529 62 



$15,083 23 



32,955 20 



103,251 42 



$208,268 55 $151,289 85 



34 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 



Amounts brought for voard. 



Maixtenaxce and Operation of Works — Con. 
Reaervoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds — Con. 

Brooms, brushes and janitor's supplies, 

Castings, ironwork and metals 

Cement and lime, 

Drafting and photo supplies, 

Fertilizer and planting material 

Freight and express 

Fuel 

Gypjsy moth supplies, 

Hardware 

Hay and grain, 

Lighting, 

Lumber, 

Machinery, 

Paints and oils 

Pipe and fittings, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Rubber and oiled goods, 

Stable expenses, 

Sand, gravel and stone 

Traveling expenses, 

Telephones, 

Teaming, 

Tools and appliances, 

Vehicles, harnesses and fittings, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Contracts: — 
The Snare & Triest Co., contract 29-M, for dredging, etc., in connection 
with lowering 20-inch siphon at Fox Hill Bridge under the Saugus 
River between the city of Lynn and the town of Saugus (chapter 631, 

Acts of 1912) 

Robb Engineering Co., Ltd., for installing 99 spellerized tubes in vertical 
boiler at Pegan Brook Pumping Station, Xatiok, Mass., 



Payments in lieu of taxes, 

Total expenditures for maintenance and operation. 



$208,268 55 $151,289 85 



205 S3 

5,982 76 

1,658 39 

196 90 

1,089 88 

732 46 

6,182 72 

922 22 

1,075 52 

2,241 50 

738 54 

2,224 46 

6,024 32 

1,390 99 

3,488 96 

167 5S 

667 63 

538 88 

9(21 28 

710 13 

2,881 52 

1.055 29 

1,385 01 

5,362 09 

398 09 

2,503 04 



1,460 99 
85 00 



260,560 53 
38,701 45 

^50,551 83 



(h) Receipts. 

The total amount of receipts from the operations of the Board 
and from sales of property for the year beginning January 1, 1912, 
and ending December 31, 1912, is $109,164.97, and the total amount 
from the time of the organization of the Metropolitan Water Board, 
July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1912, is $874,649.81. The general 
character of these receipts is as follows : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



35 



General Character of Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1912. 



For distribution back to District: — 

Fees for admission to District 

Water furnished to cities and towns outside of 

District, 

Water furnished to water companies, . 



To the credit of the loan fund: — 
Real estate and buildings, . 
Tools, supplies and reimbursements, 
District entrance fees (Swampscott), 



To the credit of the maintenance fund: — 
TooU, supplies and reimbursements, . 



To the credit of the sinking fund: — 

Water furnished to cities and towns outside of 
District and to water companies. 

Forfeiture for contracts awarded but not exe- 
cuted, 

Rents, 

Land products, 

Unclassified receipts ahd interest. 



Total receipts, 



$22 00 
11,957 43 



$78,502 56 



$9,150 17 



1,985 00 

7,329 11 

218 70 



$11,979 43 



78,502 561 



18,682 98 



$109,164.97 



$92,265 00 

90,454 77 
37,145 88 



$44,096 34 

176,739 80 

90,000 00 



125,281 50 



$41,769 21 

500 00 

97,682 10 

74,931 00 

3,784 21 



$219,865 65 



310,836 14 



125,281 50 



218,666 52 



$874,649 81 



1 Included in this amount is the sum of $46,213.28, being amount received from city of Boston, in 
reimbursement for the Mystic Tunnel Extension. 

The foregoing receipts have been credited to the various objects 
or works, as follows : — 



Sources of Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1912. 



Admission into Metropolitan Water District 
(Quincy, Nahant, Arlington, Stoneham, Mil- 
ton, Lexington and Swampscott), 

Supplying water to cities and towns outside of 
Water District (Swampscott, Revere, Lexing- 
ton, Wakefield, Cambridge, Framingham, 
Westborough State Hospital, Worcester and 
U. S. Government), and to water companies 
(Framingham, Milton and Revere), 



Amounts carried forward, 




$182,265 00 



169,369 86 



$351,634 86 



$351,634 86 



36 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Sources of Receipts. 



i For the Year ending 
I December 31, 1912. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1912. 



Amounts brought forward, 




19,150 17 




1351,634 86 


Construction and acquisition of works: — 










Administration, 


S19 89 




$363 49 




Wachusett Dam, . 










609 90 




7,799 47 




Wachusett Reservoir, . 










522 00 




140,891 11 




Wachusett Aqueduct, . 










- 




5,204 70 




Weston Aqueduct, 










- 




5,200 13 




Sudbury Reservoir, 










- 




10,640 42 




Distribution system, . 










7,737 53 




118,735 01 




Diversion of water, Clinton sewerage system, 


- 




1,389 46 




Purchase of existing water works. 


3,110 GO 


11,999 32 


21,229 08 


311,452 87 

• 








Maintenance and operation of works: — 










Administration, 


$314 08 




$660 50 




General supervision, . 










1,028 46 




3,033 47 




Wachusett Aqueduct, . 










279 39 




7,318 72 




Wachusett Reservoir, . 










7,385 18 




48,034 39 




Power plant, 










27,843 37 




34,994 13 




Sudbury system, . 










1,810 98 




21,572 09 




Distribution system, . 










49,205 67 




89,985 37 




Clinton sewerage system, 










148 35 




5,963 41 








88,015 48 




211,562 08 




• 




Total receipts, . 










$109,164 97 


$874,649 81 



(c) Assets. 

The following is an abstract of tbe assets of the Wat^r Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; police supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; 
machinery, tools and other apphances and supplies; real estate connected 
with works not completed; completed works, including real estate and 
buildings connected therewith. 



{d) Liahilities. 
The sums due on monthly pay rolls amount to $1,453.05, and 
there are bills for current expenses which have not yet been received. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



37 



Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 



Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


McBride & Co., 

Camoia & Williams, .... 

De Vincenzi & Baruffoldi, . 

Joseph Hanreddy, .... 

Holly Manufacturing Co., . 

A. Varnerin Co 

Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon Co., 


Contract 283, Stillwater improvement, Wachusett 
Reservoir. 

Contract 308, Section 33 of northern high-service 
pipe lines, Distribution System. 

Contract 322, Section 36 of northern extra high- 
service pipe lines, Distribution System. 

Contract 314, Section 7 of the Weston Aqueduct 
Supply Mains. 

Contract 312, pumping engine for Chestnut Hill 
low-service pumping station. 

Contract 347, for building the superstructure of the 
southern extra high-service pumping station at 
Hyde Park, Boston, Mass. 

Contract 346, for furnishing two pumping engines 
for the southern extra high-service pumping 
station at Hyde Park, Boston, Mass. 


$778 091 

200 00 

100 00 

10 00 

1,769 00 

3,058 52 

11,423 50 



1 Held pending settlement of claims on account of this contract. 

It is impossible to state the amounts due on the claims of the fol- 
lowing for land damages, for water rights taken and for damages to 
established business, as no sums have been agreed upon, and suits are 
now pending in court for the determination of most of them : — 

Patrick Bradley, Henrj F. Keyes, James E. Welch, Byron D. 
Allen, J. Frank Wood et at., Asa Knight, Edward F. Merriam, San- 
ford C. Kendall, estate of William H. Vickery, James H. and Han- 
nah S. Wood, Francis W. M. Goodale, heirs of Willard Morse, Caro- 
line R. Braman, Charles G. Rice, Nehemiah W. Rice et at., John 
Ward et at., heirs of George K. Ward. 



VI. METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE WORKS. 

The ISTorth Metropolitan Sewerage District embraces the cities of 
Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Somerville 
and Woburn, and the towns of Arlington. Belmont, Revere, Stone- 
ham, Wakefield, Winchester and Winthrop, and parts of the city of 
Boston and the town of Lexington, — comprising in all 9 cities and 
8 towns, with an area of 90.50 square miles. The District has an 
estimated population, based upon the United States Census of 1910, 
as of December 31, 1912, of 558,140. Of the total population it 
is estimated that 89 per cent., or 496,795 people, contribute sewage 
to the l^orth Metropolitan System. 

The South Metropolitan Sewerage District includes the cities of 
Xewton, Quincy and Waltham, and the towns of Brookline, Milton 



38 :\IETROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

and Watertown, and parts of the city of Boston (including the 
former town of Hyde Park) and the town of Dedham, — a total of 
4 cities and 4 towns. This district has an area of 100.87 square 
miles, with an estimated population as of December 31, 1912, of 
381,840. According to the estimates made 66.1 per cent, of this 
population, or 252,265, contribute sewage to the South Metropolitan 
System. 

(1) XoETH Metropolitax Sewerage System — Construc- 

Tio:?^. 

The amount expended for construction on account of the Xorth 
Metropolitan Sewerage System during the past year was $53,104.32. 
A portion of this amount was paid on accoimt of the Maiden and 
Everett sewer extension which had been completed in the preceding 
year. 

The Legislature of 1912 authorized the Board to construct an 
additional main sewer in the Mystic valley, and also to provide new 
screening machinery in connection with the East Boston sewerage 
pumping station and the acquisition of additional land for the pur- 
pose. Authorization was given for the issue of an additional sewer- 
age loan to an amount not exceeding $378,000. 

(a) New Mystic Sewer. 

The Board was authorized to construct an additional main sewer 
in the Mystic valley, extending from a point in the old Mystic 
valley sewer, near the boundary line between the city of Woburn 
and the town of Winchester, and running through the town of 
Winchester and a part of the city of Medford to a point in the 
Metropolitan main sewer a little below its junction w^th the old 
Mystic valley sewer, a length of about 3.4 miles. 

The making of surveys and borings was begun immediately after 
the passage of the act of last year and a contract was made on 
October 15, 1912, for the construction of 4,800 feet at the lower 
end of the proposed sewer. The work upon this section has since 
been carried on successfully, and it is estimated that about 20 per 
cent, of the section has so far been completed. It is expected that 
the necessary work preliminary to the making of contracts for the 
remaining sections of the sewer will be completed in the early part of 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 39 

the year, and that work throughout the entire length will be under- 
taken before the close of the year. As the route passes through the 
central portion of the town of Winchester and along the Aberjona 
River the construction of a portion of its length is attended with 
considerable difficulty. 

(h) New Screening Worlcs at East Boston Pumping Station. 

The Board was also authorized to provide new screening machin- 
ery in connection with the East Boston sewerage pumping station 
and to take such additional land as might be necessary in connection 
with the installation of such machinery. A taking for the exten- 
sion of the pumping station in which the machinery should be in- 
stalled was made of about 1,715 square feet of land lying directly 
south of the pumping station lot. A contract has been made for the 
erection of the building addition, and the work under it is about to be 
begun. Plans have been nearly completed for the new screening 
machinery which will be called for. Considerable preliminary work 
has already been undertaken. The present screens at this station are 
located underground in very contracted quarters, and the care of 
them has been attended with much difficulty and inconvenience. By 
the change the screens will be operated from the ground level and a 
great sanitary as well as mechanical improvement will be effected. 

(c) Siphon under Metropolitan Sewer in East Boston. 

The city of Boston in extending its sewerage system was com- 
pelled to carry a siphon under the Metropolitan sewer in Saratoga 
Street. As the work involved much difficulty and the use of com- 
pressed air, as well as considerable danger to the Metropolitan sewer 
during construction, it was desired by the city of Boston that the 
construction of the new siphon under the sewer should be undertaken 
by the Board. The siphon was, however, completed with entire 
success and the city of Boston has reimbursed the Commonwealth 
for the expense incurred, which amounted to $9,689.46. 

(2) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construc- 

TIOIT. 

'No considerable work was undertaken during the past year on 
the South Metropolitan Sewerage System. Expenditures on account 
of construction were $7,258.87. The larger part of this sum was 



40 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



for a final payment on account of an old contract upon the High- 
level Sewer extension and on account of settlement for land taken 
for the same purpose. 

(3) Acquisition- of Land and Settlements. 

The Board acquired by taking 0.0393 of an acre in fee for the 
extension of the screen-house at the East Boston pumping station, 
and easements in 2.135 acres in Medford and Winchester for the 
construction of the new Mystic Sewer. 

One settlement for easements in land previously taken was made, 
for which $2,350 was paid. 

The following is a list of the takings made during the year for 
the Sewerage Works : — 

Takings for Metropolitan Sewerage Works for the Year 1912. 



No. 


Location and Description. 


Former Owner. 


Re- 
corded. 


Purpose of Taking. 


27 
28 


East Boston, — Land in Addison 
Street, a private way. Area, fee in 
1,715 square feet. 

Medford and Winchester, — Strip of 
land 20 feet wide for the most part 
and 15 feet at the nprtherly end. 
Area, sewer easements in 2.135 acres. 


East Boston Company, 

Boston & Maine Rail- 
road, Robert Bacon 
and Charles F. Bacon, 
Jacob W. Wilbur and 
streets. 


1912. 
July 20. 

Oct. 15. 


Installation of screen- 
ing machinery. 

New Mj'stic sewer. 





(4) XoRTH Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance. 

The cost of the maintenance and operation of the Xorth Metropol- 
itan Sewerage System during the past year was $155,303.15. 



(a) Sewers and Pumping Stations. 

The Metropolitan sewers in the Xorth Metropolitan System now 
extend a distance of 60.01 miles, and the local sewers which are con- 
nected with the Metropolitan sew^ers have a further length of 700.25 
miles, involving 74,376 connections. 

The sewage which is collected in the various branches of the 
iNorth Metropolitan System flows at first by gravity, but subse- 
quently before being finally disposed of is necessarily lifted at differ- 
ent points by pumping, most of it at least twice and portions of it 
three times. All of the sewage of the iN'orth Metropolitan System is 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



41 



discharged into the harbor from an outfall which is placed about 
1,900 feet off Deer Island. 

The daily average amount of sewage discharged into the harbor 
was 55,700,000 gallons, a daily average for each individual con- 
tributing sewage of 112.1 gallons. The increase in the total amount 
of sewage discharged was 2,900,000 gallons per day more than the 
discharge of the preceding year. The maximum discharge of sewage 
in any one day was, at a time of severe storm, 151,800,000 gallons. 

The pumping stations operated for the ISTorth Metropolitan Sewer- 
age System are as follows : — 



Number 

of 
Engines. 



Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 



Lift 

(Feet). 



Deer Island Station (Boston harbor), 
East Boston Station, .... 



Charlestown Station, .... 
Alewife Brook Station (Somerville), . 



235,000,000 
235,000,000 

104,000,000 

22,000,000 



19 
19 
11 
8 
13 



There were obtained for the operation of the pumping stations 
6,591.633 tons of bituminous coal which, purchased at average prices 
at the different stations, varied from $3.87 to $4.45 per gross ton 
delivered in the bins. 

The sums expended for the labor of engineers and their assist- 
ants in the various pumping stations of the district amounted to 
$63,215.73 and for fuel amounted to $22,509.16. The total expend- 
iture for the operation of the stations was $101,825.53. 

The average cost per million gallons of sewage lifted per foot at 
the several stations was $0,135. 

Some special operations were called for in addition to the ordi- 
nary maintenance and care of the sewers and pumping stations and 
their appurtenances. 

It became necessary to provide a new economizer for the Charles- 
town pumping station and to reset the old boilers. The boilers them- 
selves, which had been in operation 12 and 17 3^ears respectively, 
were after careful inspection found to be in good condition. 

Considerable dredging was required alongside the wharf in Chelsea 
Creek at the East Boston pumping station in order to facilitate the 
handling of coal received at this station. 



42 



:\IETROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The work of carrying the railroad over Medford Street in Somer- 
ville and under Saratoga Street at Orient Heights in East Boston, 
through which the Metropolitan sewer was laid, undertaken for the 
abolition of grade crossings, required constant inspection and care 
on the part of the engineering force. Both of these undertakings, 
however, were accomplished without injury to the sewer. 



(h) Tanneries and Gelatine and Glue Works. 
A special force has been required for the oversight and care of 
the Mystic valley sewers which receive the sewage and waste mate- 
rial discharged from the tanneries and other manufactories in Win- 
chester, Woburn and Stoneham. Under the requirements of the 
Board substantiallv all the tanneries and other manufactories have 
installed settling tanks in which the most objectionable matter is 
deposited before the contents are allowed to enter the sewers. The 
semi-liquid sludge removed from these tanks for disposal elsewhere 
amounts in the year to about 7,924 cubic yards. The inspection of 
the various establishments and the enforcement of the regulations of 
the Board involve a large expense to the District. 

(5) South METROPOLiTAisr Sewerage System — Maintexaxce. 

The entire cost of maintenance of the South Metropolitan Sewer- 
age System during the past year has been $102,454.57. 

Sewers and Pumping Stations, 

The Metropolitan sewers in the South Metropolitan Sewerage 
System, which comprise the old Charles River valley sewer and 
Xeponset River valley sewer, as well as the new High-level Sewer 
and extension, have a total length of 43.42 miles and with these are 
connected local sewers having a length of 572.40 miles, involving 
36,215 connections. 

The pumping stations operated for the South Metropolitan Sew- 
erage System are as follows : — 





Number 

of 
Engines. 


Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 


Lift 

(Feet). 


Ward Street Station (Roxbury District), .... 

Quincy Station, 

Quincy Sewerage Lifting Station, 


2 
3 
2 


100,000,000 

18,000,000 

3,000,000 


45 
28 
20 





No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 43 

The sewage of two small districts in Dorchester and Milton, in- 
cluded in the Neponset River valley system, which are too low for 
sewage to be delivered into the High-level Sewer by gravity, is, 
under an arrangement with the city of Boston, disposed of through 
the Boston Main Drainage Works at Moon Island. By this arrange- 
ment the Board is relieved from the expense of providing extra 
pumping facilities. 

The larger part of the sewage of the District is lifted into the 
High-level Sewer at the Ward Street pumping station in Roxbury, 
but the sewage of the city of Quincy is pumped into the sewer at 
Greenleaf Street near the Quincy pumping station. The entire 
sewage is screened at the Nut Island screen-house for the purpose 
of intercepting solid matter, and is thence discharged at the bottom 
of the harbor from the two outfalls about a mile off from the 
Island. 

The average daily amount of sewage thus discharged was 
48,200,000 gallons, and the largest discharge in a single day was 
135,000,000 gallons. The increase in the daily average from last 
year was 6,200,000 gallons. 

The daily average discharge of sewage for each individual con- 
tributing sewage in the District was 191 gallons. 

There were 2,986.195 gross tons of bituminous coal obtained at 
the two pumping stations and screen-house which, purchased at 
average prices, varied from $4.10 to $4.56 per gross ton delivered 
in the bins. 

The expenditures for the labor of the engineers and their assist- 
ants at the three stations amounted to $36,993.82, and the expendi- 
tures for fuel amounted to $11,346.71. The total amount expended 
for the operation of the stations was $54,972.08. 

VII. SEWERAGE WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, expenditures, disbursements, 
assets and liabilities of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board 
for the fiscal year of the Commonwealth ending with the thirtieth 
day of November, 1912, was, as stated in connection with the Water 
Works, presented to the General Court in January, in accordance 
with the requirements of chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 1906, 
and a copy of this financial abstract is in part printed as Appendix 
No. 6. 



44 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The following statement of its financial doings, in relation to the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Works, for the calendar year 1912 is here- 
with presented, in accordance with the provisions of the Act of 1906, 
as a part of the annual report of the Board. 

The Metropolitan Sewerage Loans authorized for the construction 
of the Sewerage W^orks of the Xorth Metropolitan System have 
amounted to $7,013,865.73, to which are added receipts from 
various sources amounting to $75,444.12. The amount of expendi- 
tures approved by the Board for payment for the year 1912 was 
$53,104.32. This amount includes the sum of $9,689.46 expended 
for the Saratoga Street Culvert in East Boston, for which the city 
of Boston reimbursed the Commonwealth, and the sum received was 
applied to the credit of the Loan Fund. The total amount of ex- 
penditures approved to January 1, 1913, was $6,739,995.82. The 
balance remaining on January 1, 1913, was $349,314.03. 

The loans authorized for the construction of the various parts of 
the South Metropolitan System have amounted to $8,867,046.27. 
The receipts applicable to the Loan Fund have been $14,004.60. The 
amount of expenditures approved for payment in the year 1912 was 
$7,258.87. The total amount of expenditures approved for payment 
from the beginning of the works has been $8,820,491.40. The bal- 
ance remaining for the South Metropolitan System on January 1, 
1913, was $60,559.47. 

The bonds issued on account of the loans have been for varying 
periods, not exceeding forty years, and bear interest at the rate of 
3 per cent, and 3% per cent. The premiums received on account of 
the sale of bonds for the !N'orth Metropolitan System have amounted 
to $179,763.73 and those received on account of the South Metro- 
politan System have amounted to $410,132.03. 

As there has been no increase in the debt during the calendar 
year, as represented by the Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, and the in- 
crease of the sinking fund for the payment of the debt at maturity 
was for the same period $273,866.22, there has been a consequent 
decrease in the net debt during the calendar year amounting to 
$273,866.22. 

The amount expended for maintenance of the ISTorth Metropolitan 
System in the year 1912 was $155,303.15 and for the South Metro- 
politan System $102,454.57, a total for both systems of $257,757.72. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 45 

The assessments made to meet interest, sinking fund requirements 
and maintenance and operation of the North Metropolitan System 
amounted in the year 1912 to $472,968.75 and the assessments for 
the South Metropolitan System amounted to $477,418.59. 

The following is a detailed financial statement regarding the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Works : — 

(1) Metropolitan Seweeage Loaxs, Receipts ant> Payments. 
The loans authorized for the construction of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works, the receipts which are added to the proceeds of 
these loans, the expenditures for construction, and the balance avail- 
able on January 1, 1913, have been as follows : — 

(a) North Metropolitan System, 

Loans authorized under various acts prior to 
1912 for the construction of the North Met- 
ropohtan System and the various extensions, $6,635,865 73 

Loan authorized under chapter 461 of the Acts 
of 1912 for the New Mystic Sewer and new 
screen equipment at the East Boston pump- 
ing station, 378,000 00 

$7,013,865 73 



Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscellaneous 

sources which are placed to the credit of the North Metro- 
politan System : — 

For the year ending December 31, 1912, . $10,883 48 

For the period prior to January 1, 1912, . 64,560 64 



75,444 12 



$7,089,309 85 



Amount approved for payment by the Board ^ out of the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, North System : — 

For the year ending December 31, 1912, . $53,104 32 
For the period prior to January 1, 1912, . 6,686,891 50 



6,739,995 82 



Balance, North Metropolitan System, January 1, 1913, . $349,314 03 



1 The word " Board " refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board. 



46 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



(&) South Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized under the various acts, applied to the con- 
struction of the Charles River valley sewer, Neponset valley 
sewer. High-level sewer and extension, constituting the South 

Metropolitan System, $8,867,046 27 

Receipts from pumping, sales of real estate and from miscel- 
laneous sources, which are placed to the credit of the South 
Metropolitan System : — 

For the year ending December 31, 1912, . $372 09 

For the period prior to January 1, 1912, . 13,632 51 

14,004 60 



$8,881,050 87 
Amount approved by the Board ^ for payment out of the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, South System : — 
On account of the Charles River valley 

sewer, $800,046 27 

On account of the Neponset valley sewer, 911,531 46 
On account of the High-level sewer and 
extension : — 
For the year ending De- 
cember 31, 1912, . . $7,258 87 
For the period prior to 

January 1, 1912, . . 7,101,654 80 

■ 7,108,913 67 

8,820,491 40 



Balance, South Metropolitan System, January 1, 1913, . $60,559 47 

(2) Issues of Metkopolitais" Sewerage Loan Bonds. 

The Treasurer of the Commonwealth, under the authority of the 
successive statutes, has from time to time issued bonds designated 
" Metropolitan Sewerage Loan " amounting for the J^orth System 
to $6,625,000, and for the South System to $8,877,912. The bonds 
sold prior to the year 1912, amounting to $6,563,000 for the ISTorth 
System and $8,877,912 for the South System, were sinking fund 
bonds. A list of these bonds sold is given in the 9th and 10th 
Annual Reports. The bonds sold in the year 1912 were serial bonds, 
amounting to $62,000, bearing interest at 3% per cent, per annum, 
as follows : — 

1 The word " Board " refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



47 



Date of Sale. 


Amount 

of Bonds 

sold. 


Price 
received. 


Premium. 


Date Due. 


Jan. 29, 1912 


$62,000 


$100,349 


$216.38 


$3,000 each year, Jan. 1, 1913, to 
Jan. 1, 1916, inclusive; $2,000 
each year, Jan. 1, 1917, to Jan. 
1, 1941, inclusive. 





The bonds amounting to $62,000 stated in the 11th Annual Re- 
port as sold on July 20, 1911, were temporary loans for which per- 
manent provision was made bj the sale of January 29, 1912. 

(3) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund. 

Under the authority of chapter 122 of the Acts of the year 1899 
the Treasurer and Receiver-General of the Commonwealth was re- 
quired to consolidate the sinking funds of all the Metropolitan Sewer- 
age Loans into one fund, to be known as the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Loans Sinking Fund. 

The Board received during the year, from rentals and from other 
sources, to be applied to the sinking fund, $200.33. 

The sinking fund established has amounted at the end of each 
year to sums as follows : — 



December 31, 


1899, . 


$361,416 59 


December 31, 


1906, 


. $1,146,998 68 


December 31, 


1900, 


454,520 57 


December 31, 


1907, 


1,306,850 30 


December 31, 


1901, 


. 545,668 26 


December 31, 


1908, 


1,492,418 98 


December 31, 


1902, 


636,084 04 


December 31, 


1909, 


1,673,784 40 


December 31, 


1903, . 


754,690 41 


December 31, 


1910, 


1,931,741 89 


December 31, 


1904, 


878,557 12 


December 31, 


1911, 


2,184,674 98 


December 31, 


1905, 


1,008,724 95 


December 31, 


1912, 


2,458,541 20 



(4) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures. 

The annual appropriations for the maintenance of the Metropoli- 
tan Sewerage Works, the receipts of the Board which are added to 
the appropriations for maintenance, and the expenditures for main- 
tenance for the year ending December 31, 1912, have been as fol- 
lows : — 

North Metropolitan System. 
Appropriation under chapter 132 of the Acts of 1912, . . $160,500 00 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, . . . 740 71 



Amount approved by the Board for payment, . 
Balance, January 1, 1913, . . . . 



$161,240 71 
155,303 15 . 



$5,937 56 



48 



^METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan System. 

Appropriation under chapter 146 of the Acts of 1912, 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, 



Amount approved by the Board for payment, . 



$107,550 00 
251 70 

$107,801 70 
102,454 57 



Balance, January 1, 1913, . . ' $5,347 13 

(5) Annuai. Assessments. 

Assessments for the year, amounting to $472,968.75 for the ^orth 
Metropolitan System and to $477,418.59 for the South Metropolitan 
System, were required for the payment of interest and sinking fund 
requirements and the cost of maintenance and operation of works. 
The requirements for the ^North Metropolitan System were, for 
interest, $202,426.20 ; for the sinking fund, $114,321 ; and for main- 
tenance, $156,221.55. For the South Metropolitan System the re- 
quirements were, for interest, $301,960.07; for the sinking fund, 
$70,055; and for maintenance, $105,403.52. The assessments for 
both the Xorth and South Metropolitan systems were made upon 
the cities and towns in the District in accordance with chapter 369 
of the Acts of the year 1906. The respective assessments were as 
follows : — 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Arlington, 

Belmont, 

Boston, 

Cambridge, 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Lexington, 

Maiden, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 



Boston, 

Brookline, 

Dedham, 

Hyde Park, 

Milton, 

Kewton, 



$11,166 80 


6,122 08 


79,330 28 


105,568 39 


26,283 29 


27,799 37 


4,291 41 


42,546 70 


22,710 68 


15,804 48 



Revere, 

Somerville, 

Stoneham, 

Wakefield, 

Winchester, 

Winthrop, 

Woburn, 



$15,635 77 
65,629 12 
5,466 51 
9,708 90 
11,776 36 
10,981 06 
12,147 55 



$206,607 49 
86,141 28 
11,806 49 
14,538 32 
22,109 46 
65,065 35 



Total, . 


. $472,968 75 


Sewerage System. 




Quincy, 


. $29,944 04 


WalthaxQ, 


. 27,160 76 


Watertown, . 


14,045 40 



Total, 



$477,418 59 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



49 



(6) Expenditures for the Different Works. 
The following is a suminarj of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works : — 



CONSTKUCTION AND ACQUISITION OF WoRKS. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1912. 


North Metropolitan System. 










Original aystem, main line and branches, 




- 




$5,383,957 67 


Lexington branch, 




- 




68,585 15 


Everett branch 




- 




54,877 12 


Wakefield branch, 




• 




35,698 29 


Stoneham branch, 




- 




11,574 10 


Revere extension, 




- 




215,722 79 


Chelsea and Everett outlets, 




- 




71,216 41 


Wakefield branch extension, 




- 




190,081 97 


Belmont extension, 




- 




57,363 06 


Maiden extension, 




- 




67,092 63 


Bulkhead, Chelsea creek, 




- 




3,231 00 


North System, enlargement: — 










Administration, ....... 


$2,199 24 




$15,417 29 




Deer Island pumping station, extensions and 










additions, 


- 




195,373 14 




East Boston pumping station, extensions and 










additions, 


18,457 70 




260,895 97 




Maiden-Everett extension. Sections 65 and 66, . 


5,535 20 




63,305 90 




Stable and locker. East Boston, .... 


- 




18,691 15 




New Mystic sewer, 


17,222 72 




17,222 72 




Saratoga Street culvert, East Boston, 


9,689 46 


$53,104 32 


9,689 46 


580,595 63 




. 




Total for North Metropolitan System, 


$53,104 32 


$6,739,995 82 


South Metropolitan System. 










Charles River valley sewer, main line, . 




- 




$800,046 27 


Nepoaset River valley sewer: — 










Main line, 


- 




$866,595 66 




Brookline branch, 


- 




44,935 80 


911,531 46 
5,992,840 39 


High-level Sewer, 




$180 38 




High-level Sewer extension: — 










Charles River valley studies, .... 


- 




$3,893 71 




Administration, 


$1,139 95 




17,595 76 




Section 80, day work. West Roxbury and Brook- 










line, 


48 60 




295,265 01 




Section 81, Brookline, . 


- 




129,519 35 




Section 82, Brookline, , 


- 




136,152 02 




Section 82, day work, Park Street crossing, 


- 




2,030 18 




Section 83, Brookline, 


- 




94,065 87 




Amounts carried forward 


$1,188 55 


$180 38 


$678,521 90 $7,701,418 12 



50 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Construction and Acquisition of Works. 



For the Year ending [ From Beginning of Work 
December 31, 1912, | to December 31, 1912. 



Amounts brought forward, 



South Metropolitan System — Con. 
High-level Sewer extension — Con. 
Section 84, Brookline and Brighton, 
Section 85, Brighton, . 
Section 85, day work, Brighton, . 
Section 86, Brighton, . 
Quincy sewage lifting station. 
Land takings, purchase and recording, 



Total for South Metropolitan System, 
Total for construction, both systems. 



$1,188 55 



3,447 55 



65 00 
2,377 39 



I 
I 
S180 38 i S678,521 90 $7,704,418 12 



7.078 49 



87,258 87 



$60,363 19 



47,592 89 




230,826 05 




66,611 62 




57.864 88 




24,109 60 




10,546 34 






1,116,073 28 




$8,820,491 40 


$15,560,487 22 



Maintenance. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1912. 


North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan System, 


$155,303 15 
102,454 57 


$2,041,039 44 
1,613,920 94 


Total for maintenance, both systems, 


$257,757 72 


$3,654,960 38 



(7) Detailed Financlal Statement. 

The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the Metropolitan 
Sewerage acts, an abstract of the expenditures and disbursements, 
receipts, assets and liabilities for the year ending Dec. 31, 1912: — 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 



General Character of Expexditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31. 1912. 



Construction of Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking. 

North Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary, 

Clerks and stenographers 

Amount carried forward, 



$416 67 

375 00 

1.048 90 



$1,840 57 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



51 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 



Amount brought forward 

North Metropolitan System — Con. 
Administration — Con. 

Traveling, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, .... 

Rent and taxes, main office 

Repairs of building, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Engineering: — 

Chief engineer, 

Engineering assistants, 

Inspectors, 

Traveling expenses, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 

Engineering and drafting supplies 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, .... 

Rent and taxes, 

Repairs of building, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Advertising, 

Labor and teaming, 

Tools, machinery and appliances, 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, 

Contracts: — 
A. G. Tomasello, contract 81, for constructing Section 66 (Maiden-Everett 

extension) of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System in Maiden, . 
AUis-Chalmers Company, contract 73, addition to pumping plant at East 

Boston pumping station, 

Coleman Bros., contract 99, for constructing Section 67 (New Mystic Sewer) 

of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System in Medford and Winchester, 

Real estate: — 
Legal, conveyancing and expert, 



Total for North Metropolitan System, 



South Metropolitan System. 
High-level Sewer. 
Engineering: — 
Engineers, inspectors, rodmen, laborers and others, 



Amount carried forward. 



$1,840 57 



159 88 


104 55 


84 59 


9 65 


$600 00 


4,406 50 


633 90 


129 46 


88 86 


72 02 


45 58 


313 70 


253 79 


28 96 


42 60 


$25 43 


16,457 15 


1,761 96 


7,102 69 


$5,502 70 


3,600 00 


9,817 64 



$22 14 



$180 38 



$2,199 24 



6,615 37 



25,347 23 



18,920 34 



22 14 



$53,104 32 



$180 38 



$180 38 



52 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Characteb op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 



Amount brought forward. 



South Metropolitan System — Con. 
High-level Sewer Extension. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Repairs of building, 



Engineering: — 
Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, . 

Rent and taxes, 

Repairs of building, 



Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, 



Contracts: — 
George M. Bryne Company, for constructing Section 85, in part, 



Real estate: — 
Settlements, .... 
Legal, conveyancing and expert, 



Total for South Metropolitan System, 



Maintenance and Operation of Works. 
North Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants, 

Rent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building. 

Repairs of building, 

Postage 

Printing, stationery and office supplies. 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



General supervision: — 
Chief engineer and assistants, 
Rent, 



Am,ounts carried forward. 



$750 00 


206 67 


105 77 


30 39 


42 30 


4 82 


$91 17 


126 90 


14 48 


$28 60 



$3,300 00 



$2,350 00 
27 39 



$2,333 32 


3,477 32 


281 99 


263 66 


35 46 


118 00 


561 11 


45 75 


44 11 


2 75 


$4,834 36 


846 00 



$5,680 36 



$180 38 



1,139 95 



232 55 



28 60 



3,300 00 



2,377 39 



$7,258 87 



$7,163 47 



$7,163 47 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



53 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 



Amounts brought forioard, 


' $5,680 36 


$7,163 47 


North Metropolitan System — Con. 






Geneial supervision — Con. 






Heating, lighting and care of building, 


791 19 




Repairs of building 


106 37 




Postage, 


- 




Printing, stationery and office supplies, 


70 15 




Telephones, 


137 21 




Traveling expenses, 


50 00 




Miscellaneous expenses, 


- 


6,835 28 






Deer Island pumping station: — 






Labor, 


$16,582 32 




Fuel 


7,577 17 




Oil and waste, 


487 33 




Water 


1,594 80 




Packing, 


103 73 




Repairs and renewals 


845 83 




Telephones, 


106 92 




General supplies, 


965 81 






120 24 


28,384 15 












Labor, 


$22,425 68 




Fuel 


8,151 25 




Oil and waste, 


541 10 






2,226 00 




Packing, 


131 69 






727 38 




Telephones 


66 38 






1,196 46 




Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 


3,189 31 


38,655 25 






Charlestown pumping station: — 






Labor, 


$15,838 73 




Fuel . 


5,032 42 






318 24 




Water 


562 80 






37 34 




Repairs and renewals, 


1,312 32 






46 60 




General supplies, 


568 33 






80 58 


23,797 36 












Labor, 


$8,369 00 






1,748 32 




Oil and waste, 


230 91 






211 32 






$10,559 55 


$104,835 51 



54 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 


Amounts brought forward, 


S10,559 55 


$104,835 51 


North Metropolitan System — Con. 






Alewife Brook pumping station — Con. 






Psicking 


4 30 




Repairs and renewals, 


271 93 




Telephones ' . 


38 11 




General supplies, 


82 21 




Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 


32 67 


10,988 77 






Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: — 






Engineering assistants 


13,175 00 




Labor, 


27,379 60 




Automobiles, 


52 83 




Brick, cement and lime, 


115 38 




Castings, ironwork and metals 


397 31 




Freight, express and teaming, 


- 




Fuel and lighting, 


112 06 




Jobbing and repairing, 


106 33 




Lumber 


856 91 




Machinery, tools and appliances, 


443 79 




Paints and oils, 


779 51 




Rubber and oiled goods, 


293 76 




Sand, gravel and stone, 


58 50 




Telephones, 


19 10 




Traveling expenses, 


417 56 




General supplies 


759 64 




Miscellaneous expenses " . , . 


136 78 


35,104 06 






Horses, vehicles and stable account, 


$4,374 81 


4,374 81 




. 


Total for North Metropolitan System 


$155,303 15 


South Metropolitan System. 




Administration: — 






Commissioners 


$2,750 01 




Secretary and assistants, 


2,554 28 




Rent, . 


253 79 




Heating, lighting and care of building, 


235 59 




Repairs of building, 


29 93 




Postage 


55 00 




Printing, stationery and oflBce supplies, 


583 39 




Telephones, 


52 3'6 




Traveling expenses, 


39 60 




Miscellaneous expenses, 


4 80 


$6,558 75 






General supervision: — 






Chief engineer and assistants 


$3,506 16 




Rent, 


761 40 




Amounts carried forvxird, 


$4,267 56 


$6,558 75 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



55 



General Chabacter of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 



Amounts broitght forward. 



South Metropolitan System — Con. 
General supervision — Con. 
Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Repairs of bliilding 

Postage 

Printing, stationery and office supplies. 

Telephones, • 

Traveling expenses, . , 

Miscellaneous expenses 



Ward Street pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, .... 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals. 

Telephones, 

General supplies, .... 
MisceUaneoiis supplies and expenses, 

Quincy pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, .... 

Water, 

Packing 

Repairs and renewals. 

Telephones, 

General supplies 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses. 

Nut Island screen-house: — 

Labor 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, .... 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, . 

Telephones, 

General supplies 

MisceUaneoiis supplies and expenses, 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: — 
Engineering assistants, . 

Labor, 

Automobiles, ..... 
Brick, cement and lime. 



$4,267 56 $6,558 75 



Amxntnts carried fonoard. 



686 58 


89 79 


44 00 


151 49 


157 09 


86 00 


50 


$20,900 15 


8,208 30 


348 81 


1,538 40 


187 25 


836 46 


81 49 


1,572 76 


144 80 


$8,040 67 


1,910 41 


71 66 


229 99 


33 16 


85 78 


37 43 


338 77 


93 19 


$8,053 00 


1,228 00 


97 59 


301 85 


24 20 


189 34 


42 18 


337 94 


38 50 


$2,700 00 


20,671 82 


517 37 


41 00 


$23,930 19 



5,483 01 



33,818 42 



10,841 06 



10,312 60 



$67,013 84 



56 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General, Chabacter op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 



Amounts brought forward, 


$23,930 19 


$67,013 84 


South Metropolitan System — Con. 






Sewer lines, buildings and grounds — Con. 






Castings, ironwork and metals, 


68 09 




Freight, express and teaming, 


25 




Fuel and lighting, 


154 22 




Jobbing and repairing, 


17 60 




Lumber, 


282 31 




Machinery, tools and appliances, 


87 76 




Paints and oils, 


341 61 




Rubber and oiled goods, 


93 09 




Sand, gravel and stone, 


11 00 




Telephones, 


33 60 




Traveling expenses, 


486 76 




General supplies, 


217 73 




Miscellaneous expenses, 


72 00 


25,796 21 


• 




City of Boston, for pumping and interest 




6,423 73 


Horses, vehicles and stable account, 


. 


3,220 79 


Total for South Metropolitan System, 


$102,454 57 



(&) Receipts, 

The receipts from the sales of property, from rents and from other 
sources, have been credited as follows : — 



Account. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1912. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1912. 


North Metropolitan System — construction. 
South Metropolitan System — construction, 
North Metropolitan System — maintenance, 
South Metropolitan System — maintenance. 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund, 


$10,883 48 1 
372 09 
740 71 
251 70 
200 33 


$75,444 12 

14,004 60 

15,739 37 

2,360 36 

2,002 92 


Totals 


$12,448 31 


$109,551 37 



1 Included in this amount is the sum of $9,960.14, being amount received from city of Boston, in 
reimbursement for construction of Saratoga Street Culvert in East Boston. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



57 



(c) Assets, 
The following is an abstract of the assets of the Sewerage Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; machinery, tools and 
other appliances and supplies; real estate connected with works not com- 
pleted ; completed works, including real estate connected therewith. 

(d) Liabilities, 
The sums due on monthly pay rolls amount to $755 and there 
are bills for current expenses which have not yet been received. 

Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or 

until Claims are settled. 





Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


High-level Sewer: — 
National Contracting Co., , 
E. W. Everson & Co 

High-level Sewer Extension: — 
Timothy J. O'Connell, 

North Metropolitan Construction: — 
Coleman Bros., 


Sect. 73, contract abandoned 

Sect. 75, contract 14, 

Sect. 82, in part, contract 57, 

Sect. 67, New Mystic Sewer, contract 99, . 


$5,516 171 
1,000 00 

60 00 

1,732 53 



1 Damages claimed by the Commonwealth on account of the abandonment of the contract exceed this 
amount. 

Claims have been made by the following parties, but it is impossi- 
ble to state the amounts due for land and other damages, as no sums 
have been agreed upon, and suits are now pending in the courts for 
the determination of most of them : — 

Anna L. Dunican, Carrie S. Urquhart, IN". Jefferson Urquhart, 
Edwin !N". Urquhart, Richard Jones, James Doherty, Michael 
Niland, William H. Gibbons, Francis ^ormile, Eobert Bacon, Jacob 
W. Wilbur, Boston & Maine Railroad, Robert and Charles F. Bacon, 
East Boston Company. 

VIII. RAINFALL AND WATER SUPPLY. 
The past year added still another to the series of years of rainfall 
below the average, although the amount was considerably larger than 
in the preceding year. The rainfall on the Wachusett watershed 



58 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

during the year 1912 was 40.19 inches, and on the Sudbury water- 
shed 40.72 inches, while the average for the periods covered by the 
records has been respectively 46.13 inches and 45.01 inches. 

The Wachusett watershed yielded for consumption a daily average 
per square mile of 891,000 gallons, while the average for the 16 years 
during which the measurements have been made has been 1,094,000 ; 
and the Sudbury watershed yielded a daily average of 779,000 gal- 
lons, the daily average per square mile having been 1,007,000 gallons 
during the 37 years for which records have been kept. The amount 
of water collected from these two watersheds from which the water 
is principally drawn for the supply of the Metropolitan District was 
respectively 81.44 per cent, and 77.35 per cent, of the average 
amount collected in the series of years. 

The quantity of water collected for the water supply during the 
series of years in the two watersheds is indicated upon the accom- 
panying diagram. 

IX. CONSUMPTION. 

During the past year the quantity of water supplied to the Met- 
ropolitan District amounted to a daily average of 116,230,700 gal- 
lons, which was equivalent to 107 gallons for each person in the dis- 
trict supplied. This quantity exceeded by 6,235,900 gallons the 
average daily consumption of the preceding year. About 1,000,000 
gallons of this increase was due to the supply afforded for the first 
time to the district of Hyde Park, but the intensely cold weather 
which prevailed in the first three months of the year would account 
for all of the increase which occurred. In this period, owing to the 
continuous drawing of the water to prevent the freezing of the pipes, 
the consumption reached the amount of 152,294,000 gallons in a 
single day, which was 36,064,000 gallons above the average daily 
consumption for the year. Though this consumption per capita is 
slightly in excess of that of last year, which was 105 gallons, it is 
lower than that of any previous year since 1908. These quantities of 
water furnished to the various cities and towns as measured by the 
Venturi meters are slightly less than the quantities indicated as deliv- 
ered to the District by the computation of the amount pumped at the 
several pumping stations and of the amount flowing in the Weston 
Aqueduct, on account of the small amount supplied to the pumping 
stations themselves and outside the District, and that lost by leakage 
from the distributing reservoirs and pipe mains. 



COMPARATIVE AMOUNTS OF WATER COLLECTED IN 
THE DIFFERENT YEARS ON THE SUDBURY AND WACHUSETT 
WATERSHEDS PER SQUARE MILE OF WATERSHED 



SUDBURY WATERSHED 
1875 - 1912 



1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 



WACHUSETT 
1897 - 



WATERSHED 
1912 



1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
191 I 
1912 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 59 

The increase in the average consumption per capita was general 
throughout the municipalities of the District, there being a slight 
decrease in only 2 of the municipalities, Medford and Lexington, 
while in 5 others the average consumption was the same as in the 
preceding year. The largest increase was in the town of Winthrop, 
the average daily consumption per capita having increased from 56 
gallons in 1911 to 65 gallons in 1912. In Melrose there was an 
increase of 6 gallons; in Somerville, Maiden, Chelsea and Arlington 
there was an increase of 5 gallons, and in E'ahant an increase of 4 
gallons. 

The fact that notwithstanding the extraordinary cold weather 
which prevailed in the early part of the year there was but a slight 
increase in the total consumption of the year is owing largely to the 
compliance which has taken place with the provisions of the Meter 
Act of the year 1907. 

As stated in the report last year, the cities of Medford and Melrose 
and the towns of Water town, Milton, Winthrop, Belmont and 
Swampscott have meters upon all their services. The city of Chel- 
sea has metered 97.69 per cent., the city of Maiden 96.45 per 
cent, and the town of Arlington 92.97 per cent, of all services. The 
city of Quincy has again been active in the installation of meters 
beyond the requirements of the act, it having increased the percent- 
age of its services equipped with meters from 61.98 per cent, in 1911 
to 74.98 per cent, in 1912. The town of Stoneham has increased its 
percentage of services metered from 55.40 per cent, in 1911 to 73.62 
per cent, in 1912. 

There still, however, continues to be a great waste of water in the 
Metropolitan District, which the increase in use of meters to a certain 
extent checks, but which neither the use of meters nor rigorous in- 
spection prevents. The diagram showing the amount of water drawn 
from the water pipes in the different municipalities between the 
hours of one and four in the morning is again shown. Water is still 
drawn between these hours at the rate of more than 68 gallons per day 
for each inhabitant of the District. The necessary use of water in 
these hours is comparatively small, but the quantity drawn from the 
pipes amounts on the average to 63 per cent, of the total average con- 
sumption for 24 hours. The waste is principally due to defective 
local pipes and bad house plumbing and to the constant flow from the 
faucets in the colder weather ; and it is largely preventable by a more 



60 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

rigorous inspection on the part of the authorities of the various mu- 
nicipalities of the District. 

The Board is again obliged to urge upon the cities and towns in 
the Metropolitan District the exercise of stricter supervision and in- 
spection, not only in the interest of economy, but in order that the 
present sources of supply may be conserved so that new and extensive 
works shall not be demanded for years to come. 

In accordance with certain statutes and arrangements which have 
been made, water has been supplied to a limited extent outside of the 
Metropolitan District. The Westborough State Hospital has, during 
the past year, in accordance with the provisions of a statute, drawn 
from the open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct an average daily 
quantity of 171,445 gallons. The town of Framingham has, likewise, 
under the provisions of a statute, drawn from Farm Pond an aver- 
age daily quantity of 787,978 gallons, and directly from the Sud- 
bury Aqueduct 31,694 gallons. The town of Saugus has been supplied 
through the town of Revere with an average of 17,500 gallons daily. 
The United States Government, for its use on PeddocFs Island, has 
been supplied with a daily average of 113,900 gallons, and the town 
of Wakefield, on account of a temporary emergency at the begin- 
ning of the year was during a period of 24 days supplied with a total 
of 13,327,000 gallons. The sums charged for the water thus supplied 
have amounted to $6,606.67. 

X. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LEGISLATION. 
The Board in its preliminary report to the Legislature has not 
asked for the issue of any additional loans either for the Metropoli- 
tan Water Works or for the N^orth or South Metropolitan Sewerage 
Works. The loans already authorized seem sufficient for the comple- 
tion of such works as have been authorized and are in progress. The 
Board has, however, asked for authority to construct during the com- 
ing year a short additional branch sewer for the ISTorth Metropolitan 
Sewerage District through a part of the city of Somerville in order 
properly to dispose of the increased sewage coming from the city of 
Medford. This request is stated as follows : — 

This relief is urgently called for by the latter city. The proposed new 
sewer will be 12 inches in diameter and will run parallel with the existing 
branch sewer through Boston Avenue for a distance of about 600 feet. The 
estimated cost of the new sewer is less than $3,000. There is a sufficient 



diagram showing 

Average Rate of Consumption of Water 

IN THE Metropolitan District in 1912 

DURING THE ENTIRE DAY 

AND 

BETWEEN THE HOURS OF I AND 4 AT NIGHT 



CD 
Q 









150 



140 



130 



120 



IIO 



100 



eo 



o 




< 


_1 


2 
< 


z 


is 


Id 


Id 

2 


UJ 


_1 




Id 


o 


fr' 


ZD 


X 


o 


h- 


< 


a 


o 


(/I 


co 



o 

Z uj 

X > 

uJ Id 



H 


Z 


U 


1— 


o 


CL 

o 


1- 


I/) 


z 
< 


f- 


rr^ 


U 


U 


O 


n' 


T 


(± 


7 


a: 


UJ 


1— 


Id 


1 


^ 


i- 


H- 


■7" 


> 


Id 


Ld 


< 


< 


■:>■ 



S z 



o 

O 
< 



O 

Id 



z 




Id 


z 


O 


o 


1 


f- 


< 


_l 


s 


s 



Q. 80 
0] 
O 



70 



60 



50 



a. 

in 
c 
_o 

"to 
O 



CD 

> 

< 

20 



10 



Dec.3l,l9]l 




27.3 



70.4 



Percentage of Services Metered 1911- 1912 



620 94.3 53.Z 55.4 697 34.9 28.5 lOO.O 100.0 50.8 100.0 100.0 100.0 lOO.O 95.8 



Dec.3I,l9IE34.8 93.0 75.0 97.7 56.9 73.6 783 42.5 33.9 100.0 lOO.O 510 lOO.O lOO.O lOO.OllOO.O 96.5 100.0 



100.0 



Daily Average Rate of Consumption 1912 V///A 

" " " Night " between I A.M. and 4 A.M. 1912. 

Daily Average Rate of Consumption in 1911 shown in Red 



\ 



No. '57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 61 

amount remaining in the North Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund to con- 
struct the sewer, so that it will not be necessary to call for the issue of addi- 
tional bonds for the North Metropolitan System. 

The question has arisen several times in the past as to the advisa-. 
bility of increasing the amount which should be allowed to a city 
or town which furnishes a part of its water supply from its own 
works. The Board has considered that the time had arrived when 
some legislation should be adopted and accordingly has made the 
following recommendation : — 

In considering the admission of other municipalities into the Metropolitan 
Water District the question has at different times in the past arisen whether, 
under proper circumstances, the sum which should be allowed cities and towns 
admitted into the District for furnishing water of proper quality from their 
own local sources should be increased. It is greatly for the advantage of the 
District and the Commonwealth that all the present satisfactory sources of 
water supply should be conserved and that these sources of supply should be 
made use of to a reasonable extent. 

It would seem that when a municipality is admitted into the Metropolitan 
Water District, an inducement should, if practicable, be presented by which 
the city or town should continue to use its satisfactory sources of supply, 
provided that the terms for their use should be fair and equitable as they 
would affect the other municipalities in the District. 

The Metropolitan Works have been built of much greater size and at a 
much greater cost than would otherwise have been the case, in order that an 
ample supply of water shall be assured even at times of extreme drought 
and in every exigency which can be anticipated, and the works must be main- 
tained in readiness at all times to furnish the maximum quantity of water 
required to supply the whole district dependent upon them. If a city or 
town, upon coming into the District, proposes to take its water supply from 
its own sources so far as its works can furnish water, and to look to the Met- 
ropolitan Works to be helped out in periods of drought and when its own 
works prove inadequate to meet its requirements, the price of $12 per million 
gallons, now fixed by the statute, to be allowed for water furnished from 
local sources is quite large enough. The city or town would take and use the 
water only at times when its cost is the greatest to the District and avoid 
using it when the District has water in plenty to afford and perhaps going 
to waste. 

If, however, a municipality will upon being admitted into the District agree 
to furnish from its own sources a constant, fixed quantity of water of proper 
quality for a term of years, it is the opinion of the Board that it will be for 
the interest of the District that a larger sum than $12 per million gallons 
shall be allowed on account of the water so furnished. 

It is difficult to determine the sum which should be fairly allowed even 



62 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

under the conditions named. The value to the District of water so furnished 
from local sources would probably vary according to the circumstances in 
each case and be largely dependent upon the manner in which the water would 
be supplied. For instance, if a municipality were to supply water for its 
low service and to call upon the Metropolitan Works for its high service, 
the amount to be allowed would be decidedly less than if the city or town 
should supply its high service from its own sources leaving the low service 
to be supplied from Metropolitan sources. 

The sum properly to be allowed would so depend on different conditions in 
each municipality that it does not seem practicable to name a certain fixed 
sum for allowance in every case. 

It has seemed to the Board that inasmuch as the Metropolitan Water Act 
pro\ades that any city or town within the ten-mile limit of the State House 
shall be admitted into the Metropolitan Water District upon the payment 
of such money as the Board shall determine, it would be wise to provide 
further that the Board may, within certain fixed limits, determine a sum 
per million gallons which shall be allowed to any such city or town on its 
admission, or to any city or town now belonging to the District, for such 
constant, fixed quantities of water as shall be furnished toward its supply 
from its own sources. 

The Board, therefore, reconnnended to the Legislature for its con- 
sideration the passage of an act substantially as follows : — 

Any city or town belonging to the Metropolitan Water District, established 
under the provisions of chapter 488 of the Acts of the year 1895, which is 
assessed upon its total valuation, or which shall be admitted to the District 
under said chapter or any subsequent act of the General Court, and which 
shall agree with the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board to furnish 
from its own works a constant, fixed quantity of water of proper quality for 
a term of five or more years, as a part of its own water supply, such quantity 
to be not greater than the safe capacity of its sources in a dry year as deter- 
mined by said Board, shall be allowed and credited in its apportionment with 
such sum for each million gallons furnished in accordance with the agreement 
so made, as shall be determined in each year by the said Board and certified 
by it to the Treasurer of the Commonwealth, provided, however, that such 
sum shall not be less than twenty-four dollars per million gallons and shall 
not exceed the average cost to the Metropolitan Water District of water fur- 
nished from the said Metropolitan Water Supply during the year preceding 
that in which the assessment is made. 

The Board considered it desirable to call attention in its prelimi- 
nary report to two improvements connected with the harbor of Bos- 
ton which had been authorized by the United States Congress. To 
carry out these improvements required, in the one case, a change 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 63 

in the Metropolitan water mains crossing Chelsea Creek, and, in the 
other case, a change in the ^North Metropolitan sewer crossing Maiden 
River. The statement of the Board is as follows : — 

During the past year the United States Congress has made appropriations 
for the performance by the Government of works of improvement connected 
with Boston Harbor, but requiring as conditions precedent to entering upon 
the works changes in the Metropolitan water pipes and sewers. Both of these 
matters would seem to call for legislation on the part of the Commonwealth 
by the present General Court. 

The sum of $85,000 was appropriated by Congress for "improving the 
harbor at Boston, by dredging the channel of Chelsea creek" in accordance 
with the report of the Chief of Engineers and upon the conditions therein 
set forth. The report called for dredging the creek between East Boston 
and Chelsea so far as necessary to secure a channel depth of 25 feet and width 
of 150 feet, " conditioned, however, upon the lowering, without expense to the 
United States, of the 24-inch water main of the Metropolitan Water System, 
which crosses this stream about 800 feet above the Meridian Street bridge." 

The recommendation for this improvement is made by the United States 
Engineering Department " in view of the large present commerce existing, 
in spite of many drawbacks, and of the great prospective increase of com- 
merce " if such a channel be provided, and also in view of the general move- 
ment of the Commonwealth and of private owners in developing the commer- 
cial facilities of the harbor. 

In order that the dredging may be carried to the required depth, it will be 
necessary to lower not only the 24-inch Metropolitan water main crossing the 
creek, which was laid in the year 1900 under the supervision and approval of 
the United States Government in place of a main previously laid by the city 
of Boston, but also a second 24-inch Metropolitan main laid many years ago 
by the city. 

The lowering of these mains to the depth of 2 or 3 feet for a length of 150 
feet in the middle of the channel, in literal compliance with the conditions to 
be fulfilled before the work can begin, would be at comparatively little ex- 
pense, involving the expenditure of $5,000 or $6,000; but the actual distance 
between the pier head lines established on the East Boston and Chelsea sides 
of the creek is at the point of crossing about 400 feet. In order that the im- 
provement may be made practically available, so that vessels may go up and 
down and be taken up to the piers and wharves on either side, as necessary 
for the deri\dng of any local advantage from the improvement, the mains will 
have to be lowered for the entire width of 400 feet. 

To make the improvement of practical benefit would, therefore, as it ap- 
pears, require the sinking of shafts one each side of the creek and the con- 
struction of a tunnel under the bed for the carrying of the water mains. 
The estimated expense of this work is $75,000. 

Inasmuch as the mains were originally laid in accordance with the require- 



64 ]METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

ments, and the present changes are called for in the general scheme for the 
commercial development of the port, there seems to be no reason why the 
Metropolitan District should be called upon to defray the expense. 

A conference has been had with the Directors of the Port of Boston and it 
was understood that they will recommend to the General Court the necessary 
legislation to provide for the lowering of the pipes as suggested, with the 
expectation that the necessary work will be performed under the direction 
of the Board but the expense will be met as the general charge of the Com- 
monwealth. 

The other appropriation of Congress was of the sum of $80,000 for im- 
proving Maiden River in accordance with the report of the United States 
Engineers and subject to the conditions set forth therein. 

One of the conditions precedent to the work is the lowering by the State 
of the Metropolitan sewer siphon now carried under the river. The circum- 
stances attending this improvement are similar to those set forth in relation 
to the Chelsea Creek improvement. 

It is proposed to dredge a channel in the middle of the river to a conmion 
depth of 6 feet at mean low water for a width of 100 feet. The entire dis- 
tance between the lines of the dikes, which it is assumed will be erected and 
which will be the limit of private ownership on each side, will be, at the point 
of crossing, about 575 feet, and to make abutting lands available for the 
purposes for which the improvement is desired would require the lowering 
of the siphon for the entire width. 

Here also in barely complying with the conditions, temporary work might 
be performed which in a short period would have to be replaced and ex- 
tended at great additional expense. 

The sewer crossing under the river at this point between the cities of 
Medford and Everett is by a masonry siphon. The cost of the work which 
would be required on account of the Government dredging for the width of 
100 feet is estimated at $45,000, but to meet the purposes for which the 
improvement is demanded and to lower the masonry siphon for the entire 
width between the dikes the .estimate is $90,000. 

Other conditions imposed by Congress precedent to the undertaking of the 
work are that the riparian owners shall permit the dumping of material on 
their lands and shall execute releases to the area outside of the dike lines, 
and that the State shall pledge itself to maintain a new channel depth. 

The improvement is recommended in the United States Engineers' Report 
upon the ground that it would " result in a large increase in commerce and 
would encourage the occupation of the adjoining land for manufacturing 
purposes." 

As the lowering of the siphon is also called for, not on account of any 
question arising in regard to the Metropolitan Sewerage System, but for 
general commercial and manufacturing development, the expense attending 
it should not be imposed upon the North Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

It is understood that the Directors of the Port will in this case also recom- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 65 

mend the passage of the necessary legislation, the work to be performed by 
the Board but the expense of the work to be borne as the general charge of 
the Commonwealth. 

XL FUTURE WORK. 

The maintenance and operation of the works for the water supply 
and its distribution to the cities and towns of the Metropolitan Water 
District will require under the estimates made for the current year 
the sum of $447,000. This sum is an increase of $21,000 over the 
estimate of last year, but a considerable portion of the increase will 
be offset by increased returns to the Commonwealth from the opera- 
tions of the Board. The estimates submitted for the current year 
include the amounts required for the operation of the Wachusett 
power plant and for expenses to be incurred for the cutting of chest- 
nut wood on account of the chestnut bark disease, but an increase is 
anticipated in the income from the operation of the Wachusett power 
plant, and a considerable further sum on account of chestnut wood 
and lumber which will be sold. The larger part, however, of the 
estimated increase is made in order to meet an expected increase 
required in the rate of wages of employes in the pumping stations, 
on the reservoirs, aqueducts and pipe lines and other operations of 
the Board. 

The Board has asked authority to expend for the maintenance and 
operation of the Sewerage Works during the current year $170,600 
for the :N'orth Metropolitan District and $109,460 for the South 
Metropolitan District. These sums are respectively $10,100 and 
$1,910 larger than the appropriations of last year. Though the 
steady increase from year to year in the amount of sewage to be dis- 
posed of requires a corresponding increase in quantities of coal and 
other supplies, the Sewerage estimates have also been more espe- 
cially increased in order to meet an expected advance which will be 
required in the wages of pumping station and other employes. 

It is expected that the Board will be able, by reason of the special 
sums which have been included in the maintenance appropriations 
of the last two years for the protection and improvement of the 
water supply, both in the Cochituate and Wachusett watersheds and 
along the Cochituate and Sudbury aqueducts, to enter upon efficient 
measures in pursuance of these purposes and that much work will 
bo done in the coming year towards carrying out the projected im- 
provements. 



66 IMETROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The larger work of new construction authorized by past legislation 
which will be carried on during the coming year is the laying of the 
new Mystic sewer in the Mystic valley from the city of Woburn 
through the town of Winchester and into the city of Medford, and 
the extension of the East Boston pumping station and installation of 
new screening machinery there, for which additional loans were pro- 
vided to the amount of $378,000. Both these works will be vigor- 
ously prosecuted. It is also expected that the Board will be author- 
ized to construct a short branch sewer in the city of Somerville for 
the relief of the city of Medford. 

If the Legislature makes provision, as is anticipated, for carrying 
out the improvements authorized by the United States Congress for 
the development of the port of Boston by widening and deepening 
the channels of Chelsea Creek and Maiden River, a considerable 
amount of construction work will be called for on the part of both the 
Water and Sewer departments. 

Several cities and towns, some within and others without the limits 
laid down for the Metropolitan Water District, have been discussing 
the advisability of applying for admission into the District. Should 
one or more of the municipalities already eligible apply for admis- 
sion, or should legislation be passed by which other municipalities 
should be received into the District, further new construction would 
be called for in order to make the necessary connections which 
would be required. 

The detailed reports of the Chief Engineer of the Water Works 
and of the Engineer of the Sewerage Works, with various tables and 
statistics are herewith presented. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY H. SPRAGUE, 
HEISTRY P. WALCOTT, 
JAMES A. BAILEY, Jr., 
Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 
Boston, February 26, 1913. 



Xo. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



67 



EEPOET OF CHIEF ENGINEEE OF WATEE AVOEKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen : — The following is a report of the work done under 
the charge of the Chief Engineer of the Metropolitan Water Works 
for the year ending December 31, 1912. 

General Statement. 
The Chief Engineer has charge of the design and construction of 
all new works, and of the maintenance and operation of all the works 
controlled by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board for sup- 
plying water to the eighteen municipalities which have received their 
supply from the Metropolitan Works. 

Oeganization. 
The Chief Engineer has had the following assistants : — 



William E. Foss, . 
Elliot R. B. Allardice, 
Charles E. Haberstroh, 
Samuel E. Killam, . 

Arthur E. O'Neil, . 

Alfred 0. Doane, . 

CUfford Foss, . 
Benjamin F. Hancox, 
James W. Killam, . 

William E. Whittaker, 
Arthur W. Walker, 
Charles E. Livermore,, 
William W. Locke, . 



Assistant to Chief Engineer. 

Superintendent, Wachusett Department. 

Superintendent, Sudbury Departmenr. 

Superintendent, Pipe Lines and Reservoirs, 
Distribution Department. 

Superintendent, Pumping Stations, Distribu- 
tion Department. 

Di\dsion Engineer, specially in charge of en- 
gineermg work at pumping stations. 

Assistant Engineer. 

Assistant in charge of Drafting Department. 

Assistant Engineer, in charge of tests of coal 
and oil. 

Office Assistant. 

Biologist, resigned September 24. 

Biologist, from September 24. 

Sanitary Inspector. 



At the beginning of the year the engineering force, including those 
engaged upon both the construction and maintenance of the works, 
numbered 46, and at the end of the year 42. The average force 
was constituted as follows : — 



68 . METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Chief Engineer, 1 

Department Superintendents, 4 

Division Engineers, 2 

Assistant Engineers, 6 

Assistant Engineer and Sanitary Inspector, 1 

Draftsmen, 3 

Instrumentmen, 6 

Rodmen, 3 

Inspector, 1 

Office Assistant, 1 

Biologists, 2 

Sanitary Inspectors, 2 

Stenographers and Clerks, 10 

Photographer, 1 

Messengers, 3 



46 

There has been a maintenance force, exclusive of the engineers 
above mentioned, averaging 236, employed in the operation of the 
several pumping stations and in connection with the maintenance 
of the reservoirs, aqueducts and pipe lines, and in doing minor con- 
struction work. 

The number of men employed in the maintenance force of the 
several departments has been as follows:. — 



Beginning 
of Year. 



End of Year. 



Average. 



Wachusett Department, 

Sudbury Department, 

Distribution Department, pipe lines and reservoirs. 
Distribution Department, pumping service, 



47 
44 
68 
60 



219 



46 
44 
71 
54 



215 



52 
51 

76 
57 



236 



In addition to the men employed in the regular maintenance force, 
a force averaging 43 men was employed from March 11 to September 
14, under the supervision of Charles A. Haskin, in constructing an 
extension of the tunnel under Mystic River at Chelsea l^orth Bridge, 
between Charlestown and Chelsea. 

In addition to the men employed directly by the Board, a force 
averaging 10 men was employed from April 15 to the end of the 
year by the contractor for the Hyde Park Pumping Station. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 69 



co:n'stbuctiok 

Hyde Park Pumping Station. 

The land necessary for this station was acquired and the con- 
struction of the foundation for the building, chimney and engines 
commenced in 1911, the work being done by day-labor, under the 
supervision of the engineering department. Work was suspended 
for the winter on January 15, 1912, and was resumed on March 19. 
This force constructed the concrete foundation walls for the building, 
coal pocket, engines and boilers, the concrete floors in the coal pocket, 
boiler room and engine room basement, and laid all piping for water 
connections with the pumps and for drains in connection with the 
building and machinery. 

A contract for constructing the superstructure of the pumping sta- 
tion was made with the A. Yarnerin Company on March 28, 1912. 
The laying of the granite base was begun on May 20 and brick lay- 
ing was commenced on May 24. In consequence of trouble experi- 
enced in obtaining terra cotta material of suitable color for the trim- 
ming of the building it was decided to use granite instead of terra 
cotta. This change delayed the construction of the outside walls in 
readiness to receive the roof until September 6. On October 7 the 
roof over both engine and boiler rooms was covered with roofing felt 
but not slated. The slating and copper work were completed on 
December .7, and at the close of the year work under this contract 
was finished with the exception of a small amount of painting and 
plumbing. 

The building includes an engine room 60 feet long x 43 feet wide 
X 21.4 feet high from the floor to the roof plates, and a boiler room 38 
feet long x 40 feet wide x 18.3 feet •'high from the floor to the roof 
plates, each surmounted by a hip roof supported by steel trusses and 
covered by hard pine sheathing and black slate. Under the engine 
room there is a basement 7.5 feet high and at the rear of the boiler 
room an underground coal pocket 39.5 feet long x 32 feet wide x 9 
feet high, covered by a concrete roof, over which are carried the rail- 
road side track and driveway. There are 16 openings in this roof, 
through which coal may be unloaded from cars or teams. 



i 



70 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The external walls of the building are of red faced brick with 
trimmings of Deer Isle granite. The interior faces of the walls of 
both engine and boiler rooms are of red pressed brick, those used 
for the lower 5 feet in the engine room having an enameled surface. 
The surface of the engine room floor, which is planned to be of red 
tile, has not yet been laid. All other floors are of concrete with a 
granolithic surface. The brick chimney is located at the rear of the 
building, north of the boiler room. The portion of the chimney above 
the concrete foundation was built for the A. Varnerin Company by 
W. W. Kellogg & Company of New York. It is 75 feet high and 8 
feet in exterior diameter at the base, diminishing to 5 feet at a point 
6 feet below the top, and is surmounted by a cast-iron cap. The flue 
is 2.5 feet in diameter. The chimney is protected from lightning by a 
^-inch copper rod connected with a 30-inch x 60-inch x M 6-inch 
copper plate buried in moist earth. A side track has been built, con- 
nected with the 'New York, J^ew Haven & Hartford Railroad, to 
provide for the convenient delivery of coal and other supplies. 

A contract for building and installing two pumping engines at this 
station was made on September 18, 1911, with the Laidlaw-Dunn- 
Gordon Company of Cincinnati. The engines were received at the 
station on October 1, and their erection has been in progress since 
October 20. It is expected that they will.be placed in service within 
a few weeks. They are of the horizontal cross-compound, condens- 
ing, fly-wheel type, each having a capacity of 3,000,000 United 
States gallons in 24 hours when operated at a piston speed of 200 
feet per minute against a head of 140 feet, and are guaranteed to 
perform a duty of 115,000,000 foot pounds when operated under 
these conditions. Steam for operating the engines is to be furnished 
by two externally fired, horizontal return tubular boilers, designed 
by the department force and built by the Robb Engineering Com- 
pany, Ltd., of South Framingham. The brick boiler settings were 
constructed by the Walter H. Preble Company at a cost of $850. 
The grates were furnished by the New England Roller Grate Com- 
pany for $177.50. The steam and water piping connected with the 
engines and boilers has been erected by the regular maintenance 
force connected with the pumping stations. The floor of the coal 
pocket is about 4 feet below that of the boiler room and a hydraulic 
elevator has been provided for raising the coal to the level of the 
boiler room floor. This elevator has been furnished and installed 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 71 

by the F. S. Payne Company of Cambridge, at a cost of $490. It 
has an iron platform 5 feet square, mounted directly on the top of a 
plunger 7V2 inches in diameter. The platform is fitted with a cir- 
cular turntable 4 feet 3 inches in diameter for convenience in hand- 
ling the coal charging car. 

The building is to be lighted by means of a 41^^-inch x 5-inch ver- 
tical, automatic, self-oiling engine, built by the Troy Engineering 
Company, connected by a belt with a 3 k. w. direct current generator 
built by the General Electric Company. Electrically operated gages 
have been installed at the station for indicating and recording the 
elevation of the water in the Bellevue and Hyde Park standpipes, 
also Venturi meters for measuring the water pumped as well as that 
supplied to the Hyde Park district. 

The total amount expended on account of the extension of the 
works to Hyde Park, including the cost of the pumping station, was, 
on January 1, 1913, $163,985.51, which may be subdivided as 
follows : — 

Expenditures for Works for Supplying Hyde Park and the Southern Extra 

High Service District to December 31, 1912. 
Pipe Lines : — ■ 

Section 39, $52,526 39 

Section 40, 30,699 12 

Section 41, 16,788 23 

$100,013 74 

Pumping Station : — 

Land, $7,032 78 

Grading and fencing, 4,016 06 

Side track, 2,449 43 

Building, including coal pocket, concrete 

foundations and chimney, . . . 28,633 02 

Boilers, 3,297 52 

Engines, 5,247 66 

Piping, heating, etc., 1,745 93 

Suction and force main connections, . . 678 86 

Engineering and preliminary, . . . 10,870 51 
Total amount expended on account of 
pumping station to December 31, 

1912, 63,971 77 

Total expenditures, $163,985 51. 



72 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

^ Value of work done but not paid for, . . $17,349 08 
Value of stock used on pipe lines but not 

charged off, 903 11 

$18,252 19 



Value of work done to December 31, 1912, . . . $182,237 70 
Estimated cost of work necessary to complete extension of 
works : — 
Pipe Lines, section 39, relaying 150 feet, . $950 00 

Pumping Station, 5,600 00 

6,550 00 



$188,787 70 
Amount appropriated for work, . . . ^ . . $212,000 00 

Pumping Engine foe Southern High Service District. 

The 40,000,000-gallon engine furnished by the Holly Manufac- 
turing Company was placed in service at the Chestnut Hill Pumping 
Station early in 1911. Preliminary tests indicated that the satis- 
factory operation of the engine at full speed was impaired by re- 
stricted water passages entering and passing through the pumps. The 
operation of the pump was improved by enlarging the passages 
through the pump well and through the valves of the pump, and a 
new set of rubber valves was installed. These changes improved the 
duty of the engine as well as its smoothness of operation. The offi- 
cial test of the engine was made on October 16 and 17, 1912, with 
the result that the contract requirements were slightly exceeded, the 
engine developing a duty of 175,066,000 foot pounds per 1,000 
pounds of dry steam used. The following is a detailed description of 
the engine and of the official test, which was made under the immedi- 
ate supervision of William E. Foss and Alfred O. Doane, division 
engineers, representing this department, and E. G. Hill, Assistant 
Chief Engineer of the Holly Manufacturing Company. 

Description of Engine, 

The engine was designed and built by the Holly Manufacturing 

Company of Buffalo, 'New York, under a contract signed September 

21, 1909, and was first operated on March 27, 1911. It is of the 

vertical, triple expansion, crank and fly-wheel type, with three single 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 73 

acting outside packed plungers, and occupies a space about 40 feet 
long X 20 feet wide x 50 feet high, and when operated at a speed 
of 24 revolutions per minute the plunger speed is 240 feet per 
minute and the plunger displacement capacity is 40,020,000 gallons 
per day. 

The pumps are of the double flow type and are located entirely 
below the engine room floor, in a space about 18 feet in height. The 
three cast-iron pump chambers are located along the longitudinal 
centre line of the engine and rest upon and are bolted to the concrete 
foundation. Cylindrical cast-iron valve chambers containing the suc- 
tion and discharge valve decks are located on either side of each 
pump chamber in a line at right angles to the length of the engine. 
These castings also rest upon and are bolted to the concrete founda- 
tion and support the discharge air chamber castings, which are bolted 
to them. 

The suction valve deck is located about 6 feet below the level of 
the water in the pump well. The three valve chambers on each side 
of the engine are connected below the suction valve decks by cast-iron 
suction pipes 37 inches in diameter, which also extend around the 
high-pressure end of the engine, and joining form a loop on which 
the suction air chamber is supported. 

At the other end of the engine the suction pipes connect with the 
condenser, from, which a single suction pipe 54 inches in diameter 
extends into the pimip well and terminates with a % turn having a 
bell mouth. 

The three valve chambers on each side of the engine are also con- 
nected above the discharge valve deck by means of cast-iron discharge 
pipes 36 inches in diameter. These discharge pipes extend from the 
high pressure end of the engine through the foundation wall, the 
easterly pipe connecting with a 30-inch, and the westerly with a 36- 
inch, force main just outside of the pumping station. The discharge 
air chambers are connected by cast-iron equalizer pipes 6 inches in 
diameter. 

There are 155 valves on each of the twelve valve decks, 59 of which 
are mounted on the horizontal portion of the valve deck which forms 
part of the valve chamber casting, and 96 on the central cast steel 
cage which is bolted to the horizontal portion of the valve deck. 

The valves are of medium rubber % of an inch thick, 41/4 inches 
in diameter, with a composition disc of the same diameter and about 



74 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



% of an inch thick, between the spring and the top of the valve. 
Provision is made so that the valve can open about 1 inch, and an 
opening of %o of an inch gives a waterway area equal to the area 
throu2;h the valve. The valve seats are of bronze, with a free water- 
way area of 8.24 square inches in each. The total waterway area 
through the suction and through the discharge valves in each pump 
is 172 per cent, of the area of the plunger. Air vent pipes connect- 
ing with the discharge air chambers and provided with check valves 
are connected to the top of each of the discharge valve cages. 

The three heavy cast-iron bed plates which carry the main shaft 
journals are supported by the pump discharge air chambers. Each 
of these bed plates carries two cast-iron A frames and these six 
frames support the three steam cylinders, also two galleries which 
provide access to various parts of the engine. 

The three steam cylinders are located directly over the plungers, 
and each piston is rigidly connected to the plunger below by means 
of a single piston rod, forged steel cross-head and four tie rods, so 
that the engine is direct acting. There are two fly wheels which are 
attached to the crank shaft, one on each side of the intermediate bed 
plate. The cylinders are steam jacketed. 

The steam inlet and exhaust valves for the high-pressure and 
intermediate-pressure cylinders and the inlet valves for the low- 
pressure cylinder are of the Corliss type, and are located in the 
cylinder heads. There are two exhaust valves of the poppet type 
in each low-pressure cylinder head. All steam valves are operated 
from a lay shaft which is driven by two connecting rods attached 
to the crank shaft. 

The cut-off on the high-pressure cylinder is adjustable by hand 
and is also controlled by an automatic centrifugal governor pro- 
vided with a safety device for stopping the engine in case the load is 
suddenly removed. On the intermediate and low-pressure cylinders 
the cut-off is adjustable by hand. 

Before the trial the copper coils were removed by the builders from 
the two receivers which are located one on each side of the interme- 
diate-pressure cylinder. 

During the trial steam was delivered to the high-pressure jacket 
from the main steam pipe at the same pressure as the steam at the 
throttle valve. From the high-pressure jacket outlet it passed 
through a regulating valve, which reduced the pressure to about 32 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 75 

pounds per square inch, into the intermediate-pressure jacket. The 
outlet of the intermediate-pressure jacket was trapped to the low- 
pressure jacket, which was also supplied with steam from the first 
receiver drain at a reduced pressure. From the low-pressure jacket 
outlet the condensed steam was piped to a weighing tank. The con- 
densed steam from the second receiver drain was piped to another 
weighing tank. 

The entire quantity of water pumped by the engine passed through 
the surface condenser which, as built, contained 1,600 square feet of 
cooling surface. Of this the builder removed 382 square feet before 
the test in order to provide a larger area for the flow of water to the 
pumps, leaving 1,218 feet of cooling surface in use during the test. 

An exhaust heater containing about 300 square feet of heating 
surface is located on top of the condenser. The boiler feed pump is 
attached to the main engine and operated from the low-pressure pump 
crosshead. The feed water is taken from the suction pipe near the 
condenser and is forced through the heater and an economizer located 
in the boiler room to the boilers. An air pump and an air compressor 
are attached to the main engine and are also operated from the low- 
pressure pump crosshead. 

A Richardson automatic cylinder oil pump is attached to the en- 
gine and operated mechanically from the high-pressure exhaust wrist 
plate. 

Description of Boilers. 

The steam for operating the engine was furnished by two 110-inch 
vertical fire tube boilers 34 feet 4 inches in height, including fur- 
naces and ash pit, designed by F. W. Dean, M.E., and constructed 
by the Robb-Mumford Boiler Company at South Framingham, Mass. 

An economizer having about 1,800 square feet of heating surface, 
built and erected by the B. F. Sturtevant Company of Boston, Mass., 
is located in the flue between the boilers and the brick chimney. 

Dimensions of the principal parts of the engine and boilers, and 
other detailed information, are given in the tables herewith. 

Engine Contract jRequirements. 
The engine contract provided that the engine should have a capac- 
ity of 40,000,000 United States gallons in 24 hours, when operated 
at a plunger speed of not over 250 feet per minute against a head of 



76 METROPOLITAIS' WATER [Pub. Doc. 

130 feet, and provided a penalty of 1 per cent, of the contract price 
for each 1 per cent, loss of action in the pumps in excess of 3 per 
cent, of the plunger displacement. 

The contract also provided that the engine should perform a 
duty of 175,000,000 foot pounds, plunger displacement basis, for 
each 1,000 pounds of commercially dry steam, of not more than 150 
pounds pressure per square inch at the throttle valve, used by the 
engine, steam containing less than 1.5 per cent, of entrained water 
to be considered commercially dry; and that the engine should be 
operated continuously for a period of 24 hours at its rated capacity 
against a total head of 130 to 135 feet. 

The contract provided for a bonus at the rate of $700 for each 
million foot pounds of work done in excess of the contract duty, and 
for a penalty at the rate of $1,400 for each million foot pounds of 
contract duty unperformed, and for the rejection of the engine if the 
duty should fall below 160,000,000 foot pounds. 

Method of Conducting Trial. 

All condensed steam from the low-pressure cylinder was discharged 
by the air pump into a wrought iron tank, from which it was drawn 
into a second wrought iron tank, and after being weighed was dis- 
charged into the boiler feed suction tank. The condensed steam 
from the first receiver and the jackets was piped to a receiving tank, 
from which it was drawn into the weighing tank and after weighing 
was discharged to waste. Similar arrangements were made for con- 
veying, weighing and disposing of the condensed steam from the 
second receiver. 

The condensed steam from the separator and from a slight leakage 
at the piston stuffing boxes was conveyed to iron pails, weighed and 
wasted. 

In all cases the pipes through which the condensed steam was con- 
veyed contained a cooling coil immersed in cold water, to prevent 
loss by evaporation from the receiving and weighing tanks. Before 
the test all connections from the engine piping to waste were discon- 
nected and plugged, and the boiler feed pump suction pipe was dis- 
connected from the condenser, to prevent any possible leakage at 
these points. The blow-offs from the boilers were disconnected and 
closed with blank flanges. All valves on the branch connections from 
the steam mjjin were closed tight and the pressure maintained equal 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 77 

on both sides. All connections from the boiler feed pipe to other 
engines and boilers were disconnected and blank flanged. 

The loss of water from the boiler circulation, due to wasting the 
condensed steam from the jackets, receivers and separator, was re- 
plenished by weighed quantities of make-up water delivered to the 
boiler feed suction tank as required. The supply pipe to the boilers 
was provided with a relief valve, the discharge from which was re- 
turned to the suction tank. 

The elevation of the water in the pump well was determined by 
means of a float gage, and the water in the force main by a carefully 
graduated mercury gage connected with both of the discharge mains 
just beyond the engine. These gages were read at five-minute in- 
tervals. 

During the trial the gates on the two discharge mains were ad- 
justed so that the pressure was equal on both mains, and the head 
pumped against was maintained substantially constant at the eleva- 
tion required by the contract specifications. 

In connection with the adjustment of the mercury columns, the 
ratio of the weight of the water to the weight of the mercury was 
determined by careful experiments with a water column about 50 feet 
in height, the results agreeing within Voqo of 1 per cent, of the stand- 
ard weights for pure water and pure mercury at the observed tem- 
peratures. A test of the mercury gage scale showed it reading .003 
of a foot high, but as this was considerably less than the error of 
observation no correction was made to the observed heights. 

Vacuum pressure was determined by means of a U tube mercury 
gage graduated on both columns. All other pressures were deter- 
mined by means of pressure gages which were tested with a gravity 
oil tester just before the trial and corrected for water column so as 
to give correct readings as observed. All of these pressures were 
observed at fifteen-minute intervals. 

The thermometers used were of reliable make and after the test 
were all compared with accurate thermometers used in our labora- 
tory. The thermometers used to determine the temperature of the 
steam at the boilers and at the throttle valve were carefully compared 
before the test, and the thermometer used at the boiler has been tested 
by the United States Bureau of Standards since the duty trial was 
made. All temperature observations were made at thirty-minute 
intervals, with the exception of the temperature of the water at the 



78 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

economizer inlet and outlet and the flue gas at the economizer inlet 
and in the chimney beyond the flue, which were observed at fifteen- 
minute intervals. 

Calorimeter tests of the steam at the throttle, made with a throt- 
tling calorimeter, showed that the steam, was superheated. The ob- 
served pressures and temperatures of the steam given in the tables 
herewith also show several degrees of superheat. 

All scales used for weighing water or coal were tested and sealed 
by the City Sealer of Weights and Measures just before the trial. 

'New pump valves had been installed a few weeks before the trial 
and an examination made after the installation of the new valves was 
completed showed no perceptible leakage under the working pressure. 

Indicator diagrams were taken every hour from all the steam cylin- 
ders and the pumps. All the steam indicators were electrically con- 
nected in such a manner that all the diagrams were taken simulta- 
neously. The pump indicators were operated independently. The 
indicator springs were carefully tested at several points after the 
trial and the average results of the tests were used in calculating the 
horse power. The water level in the boilers was read from grad- 
uated scales attached to the water glasses. 

The plant was operated continuously on the regular service for 
several days before the test and was operated at rated capacity 
for about one hour before the trial was begun, and the condition of 
the fires under the boilers at the beginning and end of the trial was 
as nearly alike as could be determined by the observers. 

Flue gas analyses were made during a portion of the test with a 
portable Orsat apparatus. 

The coal used was from the supply of Sonman coal in the coal 
pocket which was being used for the regular operation of the sta- 
tion, but unexpectedly gave much trouble from clinker which formed 
over the grates and necessitated more frequent cleaning of the fires 
than was customary in regular service. 

The analysis of the sample of coal used during the test showed 
that it contained a larger percentage of sulphur than is usually found 
in this coal, and this is believed to be the cause of the low coal duty 
obtained, as only slightly better results were obtained from a 12-hour 
check test made on October 29 with similar coal. 

It was not feasible to make weir measurements of the quantity of 
water pumped during the trial. An attempt was made to measure 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



79 



the discharge by means of a pitometer but on account of unfavorable 
conditions the measurements were imsatisfactory and no deter- 
mination of the slip of the pumps was made. As the leakage past 
the plunger was very small, and the valves new, it is not believed 
that the slip exceeded the requirements of the specification. 



Principal Dimensions of Engine. 

1. Diameter of high-pressure cyHnder (inches), 

2. Diameter of intermediate-pressure cylinder (inches), 

3. Diameter of low-pressure cylinder (inches), 

4. Diameter of piston rod (inches), 

5. Diameter of plungers (inches), .... 

6. Stroke of piston and plungere, engine running (feet), 

7. Displacement of three plungers per revolution (cubic feet) 

8. Displacement of three plungers per revolution (gallons), 

9. Diameter of fly wheels (feet), 

10. Weight of each fly wheel (pounds), .... 

11. Speed of engine for a discharge of 40,000,000 gallons per 

day, plunger displacement basis (revolutions per min- 
ute), 

12. Plunger speed for a discharge of 40,000,000 gallons per 

day, plunger displacement basis (feet per minute), . 



32 

60 

90 

7.5 

43.5 

5 

154.8 

1,158 

18 

62,000 



23.988 
239.88 



Principal Dimensions of Boiler Plant. 

13. Diameter of each boiler (inches), 109.875 

14. Over all length of each boiler (feet), 24.12 

15. Number of tubes in each boiler, 484 

16. Diameter of tubes (inches), 2 

17. Length of tubes between tube sheets (feet), .... 14.86 

18. Water heating surface of each boiler as used during the 

trial (square feet), 2,704.10 

19. Superheating surface of each boiler as used during the trial 

(square feet), 933.57 

20. Total heating surface of each boiler as used during the trial 

(square feet), 3,637.67 

21. Area through tubes (square feet), 8.38 

22. Grate area of each boiler (square feet), .... 53.86 

23. Ratio of water heating surface to grate area, . . . 50.21 to 1 

24. Height of brick chimney above ,grate (feet), . . . 125 

25. Inside diameter of brick chimney (feet), .... 4.5 



80 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Average Pressures. 

26. Steam at boilers (pounds per square inch), 

27. Steam at throttle valve (pounds per square inch), 

28. Steam in first receiver (pounds per square inch), 

29. Vacuum in second receiver (inches of mercury), 

30. Vacuum in condenser (inches of mercury), 

31. Absolute pressure in condenser (pounds per square inch), 

32. Atmospheric pressure (inches of mercury at 32° Fahren 

heit), 

33. Atmospheric pressure (pounds per square inch), 

34. Elevation of water in force main (feet), . 

35. Elevation of water in pump well (feet), . 
30. Head pumped against (feet), .... 

37. Draft in furnace of Boiler No. 15 (inches of water), 

38. Draft in furnace of Boiler No. 16 (inches of water), 

Average Temperatures. 

39. Steam at boilei-s (degrees Fahrenheit), .... 

40. Steam entering high-pressure cylinder (degrees Fahren- 

heit), 

41. Steam at first receiver drain (degrees Fahrenheit), . 

42. Steam at second receiver drain (degrees Fahrenheit), 

43. Steam at low-pressure jacket drain (degTees Fahrenheit), 

44. Exhaust steam from low-pressure cylinder (degrees Fahren- 

heit), 

45. Water at feed-water heater inlet (degrees Fahrenheit), 

46. Water at feed-water heater outlet (degrees Fahrenheit), 

47. Circulating water entering condenser (degrees Fahrenheit), 

48. Circulating water leaving condenser (degrees Fahrenheit), 

49. Water in boiler-feed suction tank (degrees Fahrenheit), . 

50. Water in boiler-feed make-up tank (degrees Fahrenheit), 

51. Water entering economizer (degrees Fahrenheit), 

52. Water leaving economizer (degrees Fahrenheit), 

53. Air in engine room at floor (degrees Fahrenheit), . 

54. Air in engine room at gallery (degrees Fahrenheit), 

55. Air in boiler room at floor (degi'ees Fahrenheit), 

56. Air outside pumping station (degrees Fahrenheit), . 

57. Flue gas entering economizer (degrees Fahrenheit), . 

58. Flue gas in chimney beyond flue (degrees Fahrenheit), 



152.1 

151.0 

26.5 

7.9 

28.3 

0.9 

30.06 

14.76 

264.84 

132.75 

132.09 

0.5 



396 

382 
249 
193 
207 

103 
62 
96 
55 

58 

61 

58 

96 

144 

74 

83 

82 

46 

366 

255 



Useful Work done hy Engine. 

59. Total revolutions, 34,786 

60. Average revolutions per minute, . . " . . . . 24.16 

61. Water pumped per revolution, plunger displacement basis 

at 62.38 pounds per cubic foot (pounds), . . . 9,656.54 



1 Gage out of order. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



81 



62. Total water pumped for 24 hours, plunger displacement 

basis (gallons), 40,282,000 

63. Useful work, plunger displacement basis (million foot 

pounds), 44,370.5 

64. Plunger leakage (gallons), 6,154 

65. Plunger leakage (pounds), 51,324 

Steam used hy Engine. 
QQ. Steam from cylinders (pounds), 216,633 

67. Steam from jackets and first receiver (pounds), . . 26,406 

68. Steam from second receiver (pounds), .... 10,351 

69. Steam from leak at high-pressure piston stuffing box 

(pounds), 60 

70. Total steam used by engine, 15° superheat at throttle 

(pounds), 253,450 

71. Average steam per indicated horse power per hour 

(pounds), 10.19 

72. Average steam per delivered horse power per hour 

(pounds), 11.31 

73. Proportion of total steam from jackets and receivers. Item 

67 plus Item 68 divided by Item 70 (per cent.), . . 14.50 



Steam Balance. 

74. Total water fed to boilers (pounds), .... 

75. Add for boiler level low at end of test (pounds), 

76. Total wa-ter evaporated (pounds), .... 

77. Water from separator (pounds), 

78. Steam blown through calorimeter (pounds), 

79. Total steam accounted for, Item 70 plus Item 77 plus Item 

78 (pounds), 

80. Steam unaccounted for. Item 76 minus Item 79 (pounds), 

81. Steam unaccounted for, average per hour (pounds), . 



255,533 
244 

255,777 
488 
215 

254,153 

1,624 

67.7 



Coal Data. 

82. Moisture in coal as used (per cent, of weight), . 

83. Calorific value per pound of dry coal (British thermal 

units), 

84. Volatile matter in dry coal (per cent, of weight), 

85. Sulphur in dry coal (per cent, of weight), 

86. Ash in dry coal (per cent, of weight), 

87. Total moist coal used (pounds), . 

88. Total dry coal used (pounds), 

89. Ashes, 7.5 per cent, of dry coal (pounds), 

90. Total combustible (pounds). 



2.52 

14,843 

18.35 

2.05 

5.97 

30,521 

29,752 

2,230 

27,522 



82 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Bate of Combustion and Evaporation. 

91. Dry coal burned per square foot of grate surface per hour 

(pounds), 

92. Combustible burned per square foot of grate surface per 

hour (pounds), 

93. Water evaporated per pound of dry coal, actual, including 

economizer (pounds), 

94. Water evaporated per pound of combustible, actual, in- 

cluding economizer (pounds), 

95. Equivalent water evaporated per pound of dry coal, from 

and at 212° Fahrenheit, including economizer (pounds), 
QQ. Equivalent water evaporated per pound of dry coal, from 
and at 212° Fahrenheit, excluding economizer (pounds), 

97. Equivalent water evaporated per pound of combustible, 

from and at 212° Fahrenheit, including economizer 
(pounds), 

98. Equivalent water evaporated per pound of combustible, 

from and at 212° Fahrenheit, excluding economizer 
(pounds), 



11.51 

10.65 

8.60 

9.29 

10.18 

9.76 

11.11 

10.55 



Heat Data. 

99. Heat equivalent of total combustible, Item 90 multiplied 

by 15,785 (British thermal units), 434,434,770 

100. Heat imparted to steam in boilers and feed water in econ- 

omizer (British thermal units), ..... 293,820,673 

101. Heat consumed by engine (British thermal units),' . . 285,255,177 

102. Heat consumed per indicated horse power per hour (British 

thermal units), 11,469 

103. Heat consumed per delivered horse power per hour (British 

thermal units), 12,729 



Horse Power Data. 

104. Average indicated horse power, high-pressure cylinder, 

105. Average indicated horse power, intermediate-pressure cyl 

inder, . . . 

106. Average indicated horse power, low-pressure cylinder, 

107. Total indicated horse power, 

108. Average delivered horse jDOwer, 

109. Average friction of engine (per cent.). 



390.41 J 

326.76 

319.16 

1,036.33 

933.72 

9.90 



« A. S. M. E. Engine Code, 1902. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



83 



Duties. 

110. Duty per 1,000 pounds dry steam, contract basis, Item 63 

multiplied by 1,000 divided by Item 70 (foot pounds), . 175,066,000 

111. Duty per 1,000,000 British thermal units, Item 63 multi- 

plied by 1,000,000 divided by Item 101 (foot pounds),' . 155,547,000 

112. Duty per 100 pounds of dry coal, Item 63 multiplied by 100 

divided by Item 88 (foot pounds), 149,135,000 



Efficiencies. 

113. Efficiency of boilers and economizer, based on combustible. 

Item 100 divided by Item 99 (per cent.),' 

114. Thermal efficiency of engine, indicated horse power basis 

(per cent.), 

115. Thermal efficiency of engine, delivered horse power basis 

(per cent.), 



67.63 
22.20 
20.01 



The cost of installing this engine, including boilers and connec- 
tions with water mains, to December 31, 1912, was $148,265.44, as 
follows : — 

3Iachinery. 

Engine No. 12, contract price including unpaid 

balance of $1,769, 

Hydraulic valves, pipes and special castings. 
Labor and supplies for engine foundation and 

miscellaneous work, . ' . 

Total for engine, $112,870 55 

Boilers Nos. 15 and 16, contract price, 

Erecting boilers, 

Fuel economizer, 

Smoke flues, 

Grates, 

Non-conducting covering for boilers, steam 

pipes and flues, 

Steam pipes, 

Railings and galleries, .... 

Valves and special castings. 

Labor and supplies for boiler foundations and 

miscellaneous work, . . . . 

Total for boilers, 19,011 57 

Engineering for engine and boilers, 5,468 00 



$99,769 00 

3,515 54 

9,586 01 

$10,448 00 

600 00 

1,740 00 

536 00 

. 437 75 

739 00 

447 00 

553 48 

371 96 

3,138 38 



Total for machinery, . 



. $137,350 12 



2 A. S. M. E. Engine Code, 1902. 



3 A. S. M. E. Boiler Code, 1899. 



84 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Connections with Existing Water Mains. 

Pipes, special eastings and valves, . . . $5,924 45 

Labor, supplies and miscellaneous work, . . 3,944 04 

Engineering, 1,046 83 

Total for connections, $10,915 32 



Total for machinery and connections, .... $148,265 44 
Amount appropriated for work, $150,000 00 

Miscellaneous. 
A Hersey detector meter ^ type P.M., size 4 inclies x 2 inches, was 
installed on July 21 on Ravine Road, in Stoneham, for the purpose 
of measuring the water supplied to the 'New England Sanitarium 
and to a few houses in the immediate vicinity. 

MAIIS^TEl^ANCE. 

Rainfall and Yield. 
The rainfall on the Wachusett watershed during the year 1912 was 
40.19 inches, and on the Sudbury watershed 40.72 inches. These 
amounts, although greater than the corresponding figures for the 
previous year, are still below the average of past years, and the 
year 1912 was the sixth consecutive year on the Wachusett water- 
shed and the ninth on the Sudbury watershed when the rainfall was 
below the average. The distribution of the rainfall was more favor- 
able for its collection in the storage reservoirs than during the three 
years just preceding. 

Storage Reseevoies. 

On January 1, 1912, the storage reservoirs contained 59,980,- 
000,000 gallons, which is about two-thirds of their capacity when 
full. On February 20 the reservoirs contained 59,064,200,000 gal- 
lons, which was the smallest amount during the year. There was a 
continuous and rapid gain in storage after March 12 until the middle 
of May, when all of the reservoirs were full. After June 7 there 
was a monthly loss in storage of about 3,000,000,000 gallons until 
the 22d of October. The loss was less rapid during the remainder 
of the year, owing to an increased rainfall, and during the last four 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



85 



days of the year there was a gain of 700,000,000 gallons, the amount 
stored on January 1, 1913 being 64,220,100,000 gallons. 

The following table gives the quantity of water stored in the 
storage reservoirs at the beginning of each month : — 



Date. 


In 
Wachusett 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


In Sudbury 
Reservoir and 
Framingham 

Reservoir 
No. 3 

(Gallons). 


In All Other 

Storage 

Reservoirs 

(Gallons). 


Total 
(Gallons). 


1912. 
January 1, 


48,910,000,000 


6,980,900,000 


4,089,100,000 


59,980,000,000 


February 1, 










. 


49,759,100,000 


5,913,600,000 


4,961,900,000 


60,634,600,000 


March 1, 












49,315,900,000 


6,648,400,000 


5,855,500,000 


61.819.800,000 


April 1, 












58,623,300,000 


6,247,500,000 


6,996,900,000 


71.867,700,000 


May 1, 












64,456,600,000 


7,025,900,000 


7,302,900,000 


78.785,400,000 


June 1, 












65,359,200,000 


8,502,200,000 


7.361,700,000 


81,223,100,000 


July!, 












64,174,600,000 


7,493,300,000 


7,141,500,000 


78,809,400,000 


August 1, 












60,016,200,000 


8,273,300,000 


7,073,300,000 


75,362,800,000 


September 1, 










58,016,500.000 


7,341,400,000 


6,747,700,000 


72,105,600.000 


October 1, . 










55,920,000,000 


6,591.400,000 


6,314,900,000 


68.826,300.000 


November 1, 










53,188,800,000 


6,758,100,000 


6,176,300,000 


66,123,200,000 


December 1, 










51,326,200,000 


6,565,900,000 


6,250,200.000 


64,142,300.000 


January 1, . 


L913. 








50,652,200,000 


6,903,800,000 


6.664.100,000 


64.220,100,000 



Wachusett Reservoir, — At the beginning of the year the water in 
this reservoir was at elevation 382.30, or 12.7 feet below high-water 
mark. The reservoir rose about 0.75 of a foot during January, but 
fell one foot during the first three weeks of February and reached 
the lowest point of the year, 381.94, on February 21. After this 
date there was a slow rise in the elevation of the surface until March 
12, after which the rise was continuous and rapid until April 23, 
when the elevation of the surface was 394.56 or 0.44 of a foot below 
full-reservoir level. After April 23 the reservoir rose slowly and 
on May 17, when it was at elevation 395.29, water was allowed to 
waste at the waste-weir. During the period from May 17 to June 
22, 1,741,300,000 gallons were wasted over the waste-weir into the 
river, the greater portion of which was wasted during the month of 
May. The reservoir reached its greatest elevation, 395.36, on May 
22. After June 22 the reservoir surface fell steadily about 2 feet 



86 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

per month until the latter part of December, and on January 1, 1913, 
the water surface was 383.79, or 11.21 feet below high-water mark. 

Additional stripping of the soil, made necessary by caving of the 
shores, caused by heavy wave action, was done over an area of 6.19 
acres, extending over a length of about 4 miles of shore, in widths 
varying from 5 to 28 feet. Since 1908, when this reservoir was first 
filled, the action of the waves has caused a recedence of the shore 
line, especially at points where the banks were high and steep or 
composed of very fine material. This action has been greatest at 
Greenhalge Point, Sawyer's Mills Bluffs and Scar Hill Bluff in 
Boylston, and at Pine Hill in West Boylston. When the reservoir 
was constructed the soil was removed to a horizontal distance of 50 
feet beyond high-water mark, but the caving shores have made neces- 
sary the additional stripping which has been done from year to year, 
and the area of the reservoir at elevation 395 has been increased by 
14.79 acres. During the past year an area of 6.19 acres was stripped 
at a cost of $4,916.73, which included the cost of removing from the 
shores tree stumps, roots, logs and miscellaneous debris brought 
into the reservoir by flood waters in the spring or unearthed by 
wave action. Wave action on the shores at South Bay, where the 
public street follows close to the reservoir, made necessary the repair 
and reinforcement of the paving and riprap for a distance of 850 
feet, in order to protect the roadway embankments from erosion. 
The cost of this work was $328. 

The action of frost, ice and water on the concrete crest of the small 
dam on the Quinepoxet River at the head of the Wachusett Reser- 
voir, caused a partial disintegration of the surface of the crest. A 
short section of the crest has been experimentally repaired by cut- 
ting out the old concrete to a depth of about 2 inches and refilling 
the space with a mixture of 2 to 1 cement mortar attached to the old 
masonry by means of iron bolts and wire netting. 

About 1,360 cubic yards of soil have been removed from the reser- 
voir bottom, in the vicinity of the Oakdale depot of the Boston & 
Maine Railroad, where the original stripping was not thoroughly 
done. The material removed has been deposited on the immediate 
shore of the reservoir and the slope of the fill where exposed to the 
water faced with boulders and cobbles to protect it from wave action. 
About 1,000 cubic yards of soil remain to be removed before the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 87 

work will be completed. The work done during the past year 
cost $780. 

Six hundred and eighty-eight feet of wire fencing and 350 feet of 
stone wall were rebuilt on property lines between land of Henry E. 
Townsend and the Commonwealth, and 1,545 feet of 4-strand plain 
wire fencing was erected on property line between land of the Com- 
monwealth and Rotti Brothers. 

The grass growing on 399 acres of the marginal lands and on the 
North and South dikes was sold at public auction for $4,729.' This 
was $2,039 in excess of the amount received in any previous year 
and was largely due to a heavy growth on land of the Board with a 
general shortage of the grass crop. 

Seven hundred and thirty-two cubic yards of sludge collected from 
the settling tanks at the Clinton sewage filtration area were spread 
on 21 acres of grass land on the rear slope of the North Dike at a 
cost of $907.37. 

Brush and weeds have been cut, raked and burned along all high- 
ways fronting the property of the Board, along the sides of the 
brooks leading directly into the reservoir, and from the face and 
riprap berm of the North and South dikes. The work extended 
over 23% miles and cost $1,013.52. 

Wachusett Dam and Grounds. — This structure with the adjacent 
buildings and grounds are now in good condition. During October 
and November repairs were made to the roof of the lower gate-cham- 
ber or power station, and to the surface of the top of the dam where 
it forms the roof of the upper gate-chamber and bastion chamber. 
The tile roof of the power house has leaked since the building was con- 
structed, due to the fact that the roof for several feet above the eaves 
had very little pitch, and snow and ice, which lodged under the tiles 
and melted, ran into and inside the walls of the building. The repairs 
were made by removing the tiles for a width of 6 feet, placing a false 
roof so as to give additional pitch to the lower portion of the roof, 
which was then covered with one-ply rubber roofing paper and the 
tiles replaced. In order to prevent rainwater from entering the 
joints in the granite cornice a strip of 16-ounce copper was attached 
to the upper member of the cornice and extended about 12 inches on 
to the roof. The copper and tiling work were done by the W. P. 
Leavitt Sons Company for $1,100, and the carpentry work and re- 



88 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

pointing of cement joints by the regular employes of the department, 
at a cost of $99.63. 

Repairs have been made to the top of the dam by cutting out the 
asphaltum from the joints in the granolithic surface over the gate 
and bastion chambers to a depth of about 2 inches, and calking the 
joints with oakum and filling the upper half inch of the joint with 
hot pitch. The entire granolithic surface forming the roof of the 
upper gate-chamber was tlien painted with from two to five coats of 
Minwax, the number of coats being dependent upon the porosity of 
the concrete. The cost of this work was $184.71, and thus far there 
have been no signs of leakage. 

The joints in the parapet walls connected with the dam, in the 
steps, landings and retaining walls on the grounds, which had been 
forced open by the action of frost during the past six years, have 
been repaired by grouting, repointing or relaying as the case de- 
manded. Fine cracks at the joints in the ashlar masonry on the up- 
stream face of the dam, between elevations 384 and 400, have been 
painted with a wash of Portland cement. This work was done during 
the coldest period of the winter when the contraction of the masonry 
was greatest. 

Sudbury Reservoir. — At the beginning of the year this reservoir 
was 2.03 feet below the elevation of the stone crest of the overflow. 
Until May 1 the reservoir was kept between elevations 253 and 257 
and after that date the reservoir was filled, reaching elevation 260 — 
high-water mark — on May 13, and remaining above the elevation of 
the stone crest until June 30. During the last four months of the 
year the water surface stood from 2 to 3 feet below the stone crest. 
During this period the muddy deposit, as well as the growth of water 
grasses and roots, which had accumulated at points where the several 
brooks enter the reservoir were removed. Advantage was also taken 
of the low stage of the water to clean the swimming pool used by 
the inhabitants of Southborough. At the Sudbury Dam some of 
the horizontal joints in the stone coping at the overflow have been 
repointed and a small quantity of concrete placed at the foot of the 
overflow covering the surface of the ledge which was disintegrating. 
A portion of the roadway leading to the dam has been resurfaced 
with gravel; chemical fertilizer and loam have been applied to the 
embankment of the dam, and the necessary care given to the buildings 
and grounds to keep them in good condition. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 89 

Framingham Reservoir ^ No. 1, — During the months of March 
and April this reservoir was lowered for the purpose of repairing 
a leak from one of the 48-inch pipe lines which are used for con- 
veying water from Framingham Reservoir No. 3 to the gate-chamber 
at Dam No. 1. A careful examination of the pipe line disclosed 31 
leaky joints which were uncovered and recalked. Twelve of these 
joints were between Dam No. 3 and Worcester Street^ a distance of 
700 feet, and 18 between Worcester Street and the old bed of Stony 
Brook, a distance of 900 feet. Nearly all of these leaks were found 
to be due to loosening of the lead in the joint on the upper side of 
the pipe, but in a few cases the lead was loose for nearly the entire 
circumference of the pipe. 

No water was drawn from this reservoir for the supply of the 
Metropolitan District. Thirty million gallons were drawn on April 
17 and 18 to replenish the supply in Farm Pond. Water was wasted 
from the reservoir in varying quantities during each month, with 
the exception of July, September and October. 

The masonry joints in the chamber in which gate No. 10 is located 
at Dam No. 1, and the joints in the air vent on the old 48-inch pipe 
line connecting Framingham Reservoir No. 3 with the gate-chamber 
at Dam No. 1 have been repointed. At the air vent the stone cap 
was removed, the brick masonry taken down for a depth of 2% feet 
and relaid with Portland cement mortar, the coping reset and a cap 
of reinforced concrete placed over the top of the structure for the 
purpose of preventing disintegration of the masonry in the future. 

Thirteen land bounds, made of reinforced concrete, have been set 
at points where old bounds were missing. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 2. — This reservoir was substantially 
full throughout the year. There was a draft of 10,000,000 gallons 
per day from the reservoir for use in the Metropolitan Water Dis- 
trict from the beginning of the year until March 18, but none after 
that date. Forty-five million seven hundred thousand gallons were 
drawn from the reservoir in April and 117,400,000 gallons in 
October to replenish the supply in Farm Pond. Repairs have been 
made to the fences at several points bordering the reservoir. 

FramingJiam Reservoir No. 3. — This reservoir, from which the 
greater part of the water used in the Metropolitan District is drawn, 
has been kept about 1 foot below the level of the stone crest of the 
dam throughout the greater part of the year. Water was permitted 



90 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

to waste over tlie stop-planks into Eramingham Reservoir IN'o. 1 for 
a few days during the latter part of May and early part of June. 

Negotiations are in progress for the acquisition of additional land 
at several points on the shores of the reservoir, in order to afford bet- 
ter protection to the purity of the water stored in the reservoir. 

Ashland Reservoir, — At the beginning of the year the water in 
this reservoir was at elevation 208.51, or 15.72 feet below the stone 
crest of the waste way, but by March 18 it was flowing over the crest 
and water was wasted from the reservoir during every month after 
that date with the exception of September. JSTo water was drawn 
from the reservoir for the use of the Metropolitan District. The 
keeper's house has been given a coat of paint, and chemical fertilizer 
and loam have been placed on the embankment of the dam. 

HopJcinton Reservoir, — On the first day of the year the water in 
this reservoir was 17.34 feet below the stone crest of the wasteway, 
but on March 29 it had risen to the level of the crest, and throughout 
the remainder of the year the reservoir was substantially full, l^o 
water for the use of the Metropolitan District was drawn from the 
reservoir during the year. The filter-beds below the dam have been 
cleaned and the controlling gates and the grounds about the dam 
maintained in good condition. 

Whitehall Reservoir. — This reservoir has been substantially full 
throughout the year and has not been drawn upon for the supply of 
the Metropolitan District. 

Farm Pond. — ISTo water was drawn from this pond during the 
year for use in the Metropolitan District. The town of Eraming- 
ham drew 288,400,000 gallons from filter-galleries alongside the 
pond, and 11,600,000 gallons directly from the Sudbury Aqueduct, 
through a pipe connecting the aqueduct with the pump well at the 
pumping station of the town of Eramingham. The pond has been 
twice replenished from the Sudbury reservoirs. On April 17 and 
18, 75,700,000 gallons were diverted into the pond from Framing- 
ham Reserv^oirs jSTos. 1 and 2, raising its elevation from 158.15 to 
159.57, and from October 8 to 11, 115,100,000 gallons were diverted 
from Eramingham Reservoir !N'o. 2, raising the elevation of the pond 
from 156.98 to 159.09. 

Lake Cochituate. — On January 1 the surface of the lake was 4.15 
feet below high water. The lake was full on March 14 and water 
was wasted during March, April, May and June. Water was drawn 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 91 

from the lake for use in the Metropolitan District during portions 
of February, June, August, September, October and I^ovember, the 
aggregate quantity being 1,541,200,000 gallons. At the end of the 
year the surface was 2.31 feet below high water. The work of the 
men employed at this reservoir and on its watershed has been confined 
to general maintenance. An increased amount of work has been done 
in connection with the destruction of gypsy and brown-tail moths, and 
considerable work has been done in grading and seeding along the 
line of the diversion channel leading from Cochituate village. One 
watchman was employed to patrol the lake and adjoining property of 
the Board from May 5 to October 5, and an additional man from 
June 9 to September 21. These men were expected to prevent bath- 
ing and boating and to supervise fishing from the shores of the lake, 
for which permits were given to the inhabitants of Natick. Two of 
the small cottages on the borders of the lake were burned, leaving 
61 at the close of the year. Iso water was drawn from Dudley Pond 
into the lake. The surface of the pond fluctuated between 1.79 and 
4.15 feet below high water. 

Sources from which Water for the Supply of the Metro- 
politan District has been taken. 

An average of 92,126,000 gallons per day was drawn from the 
Wachusett Reservoir through the Wachusett Aqueduct into the Sud- 
bury Reservoir. There has been drawn for use in the Metropolitan 
District the following amounts : — 

Daily Average 
Gallons, 

From the Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct, 36,632,000 

From Framingham Reservoir No. 3 through the Sudbury Aque- 
duct, 72,115,000 

From Framingham Reservoir No. 2 through the Sudbury Aque- 
duct, . 2,106,000 

From Lake Cochituate through the Cochituate Aqueduct, . . 4,211,000 



115,064,000 



The drainage area of Spot Pond furnished a daily average of 
224,000 gallons. 



92 :\IETROPOLITAX WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Aqueducts. 

The Wachuseti Aqueduct was in use on portions of 292 days, but 
as the flow of water through the aqueduct is largely governed by the 
operation of the turbines at the power station, in confonnity with 
the requirements of the Connecticut River Transmission Company, 
the flow was not continuous and the aqueduct was in actual use 4,638 
hours and 10 minutes, equivalent to 193.26 days of 24 hours. The 
total quantity of water drawn from the Wachusett Reservoir into 
the aqueduct was 33,780,800,000 gallons, of which 26,393,100,000 
gallons were passed through the turbines for the development of 
power, the remainder being drawn into the aqueduct during times 
when the demands for electric energy did not require the full quan- 
tity of water necessary for water supply purposes. The masonry 
work at all culverts, manholes and other structures has been re- 
pointed where necessary. The iron pipe-rail fences at the six high- 
way bridges crossing the open channel and at the upper and lower 
dams on the channel, at the Assabet Bridge and at the crossing of 
Bartlett Street in Xorthborough, also the ironwork connected with 
the manholes and other structures, have been scraped and painted 
with two coats of Smith's durable metal compound. Xo. 65 Whee- 
lock wire fencing has been erected for a length of 2,615 feet adjacent 
to property of J. J. Connors and F. X. Martin in Xorthborough, for 
the purpose of keeping cattle from the aqueduct land. Along the 
open channel portion of the aqueduct 818 feet of Xo. 65 Wheelock 
fencing and 1,769 feet of Clinton electrically welded mesh wire 
fencing have been erected to keep cattle in the pastures belonging to 
John Cowern and Xewell Bent from access to the open channel and 
to ditches leading into the same. For a distance of 2,000 feet be- 
low the terminal chamber the sods and bunch grass have been re- 
moved along both sides of the channel at a cost of about $80. 

The Sudhury Aqueduct was in use during portions of 353 days but 
the flow was interrupted for 400 hours in connection with the work 
of lining with lead the portion of the aqueduct crossing Echo Bridge 
over the Charles River. The average daily quantity carried to Chest- 
nut Hill Reservoir was 74,221,000 gallons. The aqueduct at the 
crossing of the Charles River, for a length of 508.25 feet, between 
stations 631 + 67.55 and 636 + 75.8 has been lined with lead on the 
bottom and on each side to a height of 0.22 of a foot above the spring- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 93 

ing line of the arch, or 3.4 feet above the invert of the aqueduct. 
The lead weighed 31^ pounds per square foot and was laid in sheets 
9 feet X 14 feet with a lap of 1 inch and the joints burned together. 
The lead lining is secured to the aqueduct masonry by means of a 
21/^ -inch X 2%-inch x %-inch steel angle bolted to the sides of the 
aqueduct with %-inch diameter composition bolts set in a mortar of 
beach sand and Portland cement. The joint between the lead lining 
and the aqueduct masonry was made water tight by the use of rubber 
tubing, l4"i^ch inside diameter, placed below the bolts. On the 
invert of the aqueduct the lead lining was protected with a covering 
of Portland cement concrete 1% inches in thickness, made with 1 
part Portland cement and 2 parts pea gravel, reinforced with No. 
26 expanded metal and finished with a granolithic surface. Before 
placing the lining the aqueduct was thoroughly cleaned, all visible 
cracks were filled with cement and the top and sides of the aqueduct 
were given a wash of Portland cement. After the lining was in place 
the aqueduct was again cleaned and a cement wash, in which 2 
pounds of Medusa water proofing were mixed with each bag of ce- 
ment, was applied to the arch and to the sides and bottom of the aque- 
duct for 50 feet in each direction beyond the lead lining. As the 
flow through the aqueduct could not be conveniently shut off for a 
continuous period of more than 140 hours it was necessary to inter- 
rupt the work of lining the aqueduct in order to maintain the supply 
to the Metropolitan District. In addition to the time from 8 p.m. 
August 28 to 4 P.M. August 29, when the flow was stopped for the 
purpose of examining the aqueduct, it was stopped for the purpose 
of placing the lining from 8 p.m. September 17 to 10.30 a.m. Sep- 
tember 19, during which time the cracks were pointed, the plaster- 
ing repaired, the interior washed and cement wash applied ; from 8 
P.M. September 30 to 3 p.m. October 3, while the holes were drilled 
and bolts for holding the angle irons were set; from 8 p.m. October 
6 to 4 P.M. October 12, while the lining was placed in position and 
a part of the cement floor laid; and from 8 p.m. October 27 to 10.30 
A.:Nr. November 2, when the laying of the floor was completed and 
the wash of cement and Medusa applied. The cost of this work 
was $5,537.70, as follows: — 



94 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Labor : — 

Preparatory work, emptying and filling aqueduct, 

screening sand, etc., $239 21 

Drilling holes for and setting bolts, . . . 380 37 
Lead burners, placing and burning lining, . . 420 28 
Mason, constructing gTanolithic floor, . . . 674 82 
Labor, assisting lead burners and masons and hand- 
ling supplies, 751 54 

Teaming supplies, 132 00 

$2,598 22 

Materials : — 

Cement, $160 00 

Sheet lead, spelter, lead wire and oil of vitriol, . 1,965 43 

Angle irons and composition bolts and nuts, . . 222 35 

Lumber, 32 74 

Rubber tubing, 213 62 

Expanded metal, 86 40 

Miscellaneous supplies, 134 14 

Meals and transportation for laborers, . . . 124 80 

2,939 48 

Total, $5,537 70 

Length of aqueduct lined, 508 feet. 

Cost per foot, $10 90 

While the work of lining the aqueduct was in progress, advantage 
was taken of the opportunity afforded hj the shutting off of the water 
to repair cracks in the aqueduct masonry at several points. An 
aggregate of 281 feet of cracks were grouted or repointed near Waban 
Bridge, between stations 373+54 and 375+75; of 2,206 feet on 
Hunnewell's embankment, between stations 336+65 and 342+00; 
and of 498 feet on Mahar's embankment, between stations 314+10 
and 316+40, making a total length of 2,985 feet at a cost of $260. 
These cracks varied from Vie of an inch to 1^/4 inches in width. At 
the same time the portion of the aqueduct on Waban Bridge was 
given a wash of Portland cement at a cost of $111. The floor grat- 
ings and other ironwork at the waste-weirs and siphon chambers, the 
iron railing at Echo Bridge and the manhole covers along the aque- 
duct have been painted. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was in use 100 days during the year and 
conveyed to Chestnut Hill Beservoir for use in the Metropolitan 
District 1,541,200,000 gallons, equivalent to a daily average of 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 95 

4,211,100 gallons. Repairs have been made to structures along the 
line of the aqueduct as follows : Joints in the masonry were repointed 
at Dedman's waste-weir, the east pipe chamber, the arch supporting 
the Cedar Street embankment at JSTewton Lower Falls and at the 
Stevens Brook culvert. The ironwork at the waste-weirs and man- 
holes along the aqueduct has been scraped and painted. The portion 
of the aqueduct between the intermediate gate-house at Chestnut 
Hill and Chestnut Hill Pumping Station ^o. 1 was cleaned twice 
during the year. 

The Weston Aqueduct was in use throughout the year, except for 
portions of two days when the flow was stopped to substitute iron 
protecting racks for wooden racks at the entrances to the siphon 
pipes at chambers ISTos. 1 and 3. The daily average flow through 
the aqueduct was 36,632,000 gallons, or 6,793,000 gallons more than 
for the j)revious year. 'No. 65 railroad wire fence was substituted 
for rusted cable wire fence for about 1,700 feet on property lines 
near the west portal of Tunnel ^o. 4. 

Improvement of Sanitary Conditions on Sudbury and Cochituate 

Aqueducts. 
The sanitary conditions along the lines of the Sudbury and Cochit- 
uate aqueducts through the city of Xewton have been improved by 
the construction of sewers which permitted the discontinuance of 
cesspools which were in close proximity to the aqueducts. The total 
length of sewers constructed has been 5,223 feet. Twenty-three 
premises have been connected with sewers and 22 cesspools aban- 
doned. Five premises along the line of the sewers still remain con- 
nected with cesspools. These sewers have been built at the expense 
of the city of Xewton, except for a length of 1,902 feet in Grant 
Avenue and Ward Street, where the cost of the sewer is to be paid 
by the Metropolitan Board, with the understanding that the Board is 
to be reimbursed at such time, not later than January 1, 1932, as 
the sewer shall be used in extending the sewerage system of the city. 

PUMPI]N-G Statio^^'s. 

Sixty-nine per cent, of the water supplied to the Metropolitan 
District has been pumped at the two stations at Chestnut Hill Reser- 
voir, and the remainder has been delivered by gravity. The total 



96 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



quantity pumped at the five stations was 32,845,090,000 gallons, 
which was 0.49 per cent, more than in 1911. The cost of operating 
all the stations was $105,038.22, equivalent to $3,198 per million 
gallons pumped. This was an increase of $0.2243 above the cost 
in 1911, due, largely, to an increase in the cost of fuel and repairs. 
Coal for use at the several stations has been purchased as 
follows : — 



Bt whom furnished. 



Gross Tons. 



So 

ffi 2 

h 

CM 
TO M 

« a 



3 O 

S a 
td.9 

%^ 

CM 

o a 
O 



c 




o 


fl 




o 


ci 








m 


J 


T3 


w 


a 


c 


o 


5 


-4.3 


C 


C 


*'^. 


a 




m 


<J 



O 

03. S 
01 *i 



o 



Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, bituminous, 

Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, bituminous, 

Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, bituminous, 

Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, bituminous, 

Luther Paul Company, screenings, 

C. W. Claflin & Co., buckwheat anthracite, 

Locke Coal Company, bituminous, 

New England Coal and Coke Company, bitu 

minous. 
Locke Coal Company, screenings. 

New England Coal and Coke Company, bitu 

minous. 
Bader Coal Company, bituminous. 

New England Coal and Coke Company, bitu 

minous. 
Peirce & Winn Company, screenings, . 

Roxbm-y Coal Company, egg, 

Roxbury Coal Company, egg, 

Roxbury Coal Company, pea, 

Roxbury Coal Company, pea, 

Roxbury Coal Company, buckwheat anthracite, 

Total gross tons, bituminous. 

Total gross tons, anthracite, . 

Total gross tons, anthracite screenings, . 
Average price per gross ton, bituminous. 
Average price per gross ton, anthracite, 
Average price per gross ton, anthracite screenings. 



1,334.67 
1,304.02 



27.66 
38.84 



2,010.51 
1,966.74 



2,638.69 

38.842 

27.66 

$4.05 

2.862 

3.08 



3,977.25 



$3.91 



- 


- 


698.77 


- 


213.09 


- 


120.84 


- 


- 


37.95 


- 


299.71 


- 


116.96 


- 


68.66 


- 


- 


912.46 


454.62 


120.84 


68.66 


$4.67 


$4.30 


2.50 


3.05 



1.10 

38.52 

65.09 

280.34 

26.69 



411.74 



5.38 



$4.05 
4.04 
3.93 
3.89 
3.08 
2.86 
4.76 
4.39 
2.50 
4.44 
4.42 
3.96 
3.05 
6.75 
6.44 
5.88 
5.15 
5.04 



1 Includes cost of unloading coal from cars and all expenses incidental to storage of the coal. 
* Buckwheat. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



97 



Bituminous coal has beeu purchased under contracts which pro- 
vide for a deduction from the contract price in case the coal con- 
tains less than 14,700 British thermal units or more than 8 per cent, 
of ash, and for a bonus for coal containing more than 14,800 
British thermal units. The following table shows the results of the 
tests made of the several kinds of coal received. 







Number 


British 


Percentage 


Percentage 
of Ash. 


Percentage 


Kind of Coal. 


of Samples 


Thermal 


of Volatile 


of 




tested. 


Units. 


Matter. 


Moisture. 


Beaver Run 


38 


14,804 


17.93 


6.21 


3.14 


Sonman, . 








42 


14,722 


18.75 


6.63 


2.70 


New River, 








7 


14,986 


18.87 


4.94 


2*39 


Pocahontas, 








6 


15,082 


18.74 


4.80 


3.57 


Georges Creek, 








6 


14,659 


19.20 


7.11 


1.78 


Vulcan, 








7 


14,902 


21.40 


5.78 


2.78 


Morris, 








3 


14,528 


19.19 


8.22 


3.24 


Sterling, . 








2 


15,009 


22.75 


5.35 


3.78 


Twin Rocks, . 








1 


14,890 


21.22 


5.65 


3.52 


Miller Vein, 








1 


14,793 


20.66 


6.84 


3.51 



Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations. 

At these stations a daily average of 34,752,000 gallons was raised 
123.16 feet for the supply of the southern high-service district, and 
a daily average of 45,260,000 gallons was raised 46.04 feet for the 
supply of the low-service districts and for the northern high-service 
district. Statistics relative to the operation of the engines at these 
stations are as follows : — 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons), 
Total quantity pumped (million gallons), 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Coal used in pumping (pounds), . 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 
Average lift (feet), .... 

Co.st of pumping: — 

Labor 

Fuel 

Repairs, ....... 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Small supplies, 

Totals, 

Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high. 



Pumping Station No. 1. 



Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 



Engine 
No. 3. 



Engine 
No. 4, 



16,000,0001 

942.55 

2,575,000 

1,381,720 

682.16 

133.96 



$2,421 58 

2,893 75 

358 04 

103 31 

98 04 



S5,874 72 

S6.2328 
.0465 



20,000.000 

22.33 

61,000 

21,735 

1,027.38 

118.09 



So3 81 

39 11 

6 10 

1 76 

1 67 



5102 45 

$4.5880 
.0389 



30,000,000 

5,719.05 

15,626,000 

4,034,529 

1,417.53 

120.93 



$7,874 60 

7,941 38 

1,347 27 

334 57 

317 48 



$17,815 30 

S3. 1151 
.0258 



Pumping 

Station 

No. 2. 



Engine 
No. 12. 



40,000,000 

6,035,32 

16,490,000 

4,069,092 

1,483.21 

123.61 



$7,587 60 

7,540 87 

980 69 

235 77 

226 39 



$16,571 32 

82.7457 
.0222 



Totals. 



106,000,000 

12,719.25 

34,752,000 

9,507,076 

1,337.87 

123.16 



$17,937 59 

18,415 11 

2,692 10 

675 41 

643 58 



$40,363 79 

$3.1734 
.0258 



1 8,000,000 each. 



98 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Daily pumping capacity each engine (gallons), 

Total quantity pumped (gallons), . 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons). 

Total coal used (pounds), 

Gallons pumped per jpound of coal, 

Average lift (feet), 



Cost of pumping : — 
Labor, 

Fuel, .... 
Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 
Small supplies, . 



Total, 



Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, .... 

Spot Pond Pumping Station, 

The following are statistics relating to operations 
tion^ where water is pumped to the Fells Reservoir for 
the northern high-service district : — 

Total quantity pumped (gallons), . 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons). 

Total coal used (pounds), 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Average lift (feet), .... 

Engine No. 8 operated (hours). 

Engine No. 9 operated (hours). 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 8 (gallons), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 9 (gallons), 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, ' , 

Fuel, 

Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, .... 
Small supplies, 

Total for station, .... 

Cost per million gallons pumped, . 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



Chestnut Hill 
Pumping Station 
No. 2. — Engines 

Nos. 5, 6 and 7. 

35,000,000 

16,561,430,000 

45,250,000 

6,220,263 

2,662.50 

46.04 



$21,083 20 

11,056 12 

1,534 81 

273 46 

262 58 

$34,210 17 

2.0657 
.0449 



at this sta- 
the supply of 

2,938,920,000 

8,030,000 

2,577,635 

1,140.16 

127.84 

1,254 

2,895 

538,070,000 

2,400,850,000 



$8,937 07 

4,975 61 

1,642 54 

275 61 

211 23 

$16,042 06 

5.4585 
.0427 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



99 



There was an increase of 6.09 per cent, in the quantity pumped, 
and of $2,759.03 in the cost of operating the station. More than 
half of this increase was due to the increased cost of repairs and the 
remainder was divided between the increased cost of labor and fuel. 

On February 23 the upper exhaust valve of the low pressure cylin- 
der of Engine 'No. 9 became detached from the valve stem and 
dropped into the cylinder, causing the breaking of the valve and 
piston. A new piston and valve were furnished by the Holly Manu- 
facturing Company. The broken parts were removed and the new 
parts put in place by the employes of the station. The total cost of 
these repairs was $698.10. A new double beam platform scale of 
20 tons capacity, designed for weighing coal on auto trucks, has 
been installed. The scale mechanism was furnished by the Howe 
Scale Company. The scale pit was constructed by employes of the 
department. The whole cost of installing the scale was $766.58, 
which includes $300 paid the Howe Scale Company. 

Arlington Pumping Station. 

The following are statistics relating to operations at this sta- 
tion : — 



Total quantity pumped (gallons), . 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 

Total coal used (pounds), 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Average lift (feet), . 

Engine No. 10 operated (hours), 

Engine No. 11 operated (houre), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 10 (gallons). 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 11 (gallons). 



320,590,000 

876,000 

1,151,740 

278.35 

286.43 

6,985 

303 

310,360,000 

10,230,000 



Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $5,078 84 

Fuel, 2,052 16 

Repairs, 588 05 

Oil, waste and packing, 74 15 

Small supplies, 369 00 

Total for station, $8,162 20 



Cost per million gallons pumped, . 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



$25.4599 
.0889 



100 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



There was an increase of 5.17 per cent, in the quantity pumped 
and of 5.7 per cent, in the amount of coal used. The cost of operating 
the station shows an increase of $983.64, or 13.7 per cent., due to 
increases in the cost of labor and fuel and to the installation of a 
lighting plant, consisting of a 3-kilowatt Sturtevant generator, and 
a 41/4-inch x 5-inch vertical, automatic, self -oiling, Troy engine. The 
cost of the whole plant, including the installation, was $363.46. 



West Roxhury Pumping Station. 

The following are statistics relating to operations at this sta- 
tion : — 

Total quantity pumped (gallons), 304,900,000 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), .... 833,000 

Total coal used (pounds), 923,157 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 330.28 

Average lift (feet), 131.87 

Engine No. 1 operated (hours), 41 

Engine No. 2 operated (hours), . . . . . . 8,169 

Engine No. 3 operated (hours), 615 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 1 (gallons), .... 980,000 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 2 (gallons), .... 270,030,000 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 3 (gallons), .... 33,890,000 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $3,889 31 

Fuel, . 2,240 41 

Repairs, 56 65 

Oil, waste and packing, 22 11 

Small supplies, 51 52 

Total for station, $6,260 00 

Cost per million gallons pumped, $20.5313 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, .... .1557 



There was an increase of 21.05 per cent, in the quantity pumped 
and of 30 per cent, in the quantity of fuel used. There was an in- 
crease of $855.26, or 15.82 per cent, in the cost of operating the 
station. The pumping which has been done at this station will be 
transferred within a few weeks to the new station in Hyde Park and 
the West Roxbury station abandoned and the machinery removed. 
The building and land are the property of the city of Boston. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



101 



Consumption of Water. 

The daily average quantity of water consumed in the eighteen mu- 
nicipalities supplied from the Metropolitan Works during the year 
1912, as measured by Venturi meters, was 116,230,700 gallons, 
equivalent to 107 gallons per capita in the district supplied. The 
daily average consumption was 6,235,900 gallons more than during 
the previous year. Of this increase about 1,000,000 gallons per day 
was due to the addition of the former town of Hyde Park, with a 
population of 16,260, but the greater part of the increase was caused 
by the use and waste of water during the extremely cold weather in 
January, February and March. 

The daily average consumption of water in each of the cities and 
towns supplied from the Metropolitan Works during the years 1911 
and 1912, as measured by meters, was as follows: — 











Estimated 

Popula- 
tion, 1912. 


Daily Average Consumption. 




1911. 


1912. 






Gallons. 


Gallons 

per 
Capita. 


Gallons. 


Gallons 

per 
Capita. 


Increase in 
Gallons. 


Boston, 


718,900 


85,571,500 


124 


90,037,500 


125 


4,466,000 


Somerville, 








81,080 


5,899,100 


74 


6,427,500 


79 


528,400 


Maiden, . 








46,840 


1,971.300 


43 


2,226,300 


48 


255,000 


Chelsea, . 








34,720 


2,701,400 


80 


2,935,500 


85 


234,100 


Everett, . 








36,110 


2,557,800 


73 


2,707,800 


75 


150,000 


Quincy, . 








34,640 


2,925,400 


87 


3,003,100 


87 


77,700 


Medford, . 








24,880 


1,207,100 


50 


1,222,900 


49 


15,800 


Melrose, . 








16,350 


1,012,500 


63 


1,132,100 


69 


119,600 


Revere, . 








19,980 


1,439,400 


75 


1,495,400 


75 


56,000 


Watertown, 








13,700 


889,200 


67 


922,300 


67 


33,100 


Arlington, 








12,120 


983,200 


84 


1,075,500 


89 


92,300 


Milton, 








8,300 


317,700 


39 


343,300 


41 


25,600 


Winthrop, 








11,050 


597,800 


56 


717,400 


65 


119,600 


Stoneham, 








7,600 


573,300 


78 


590,700 


78 


17,400 


Belmont, . 








6,080 


415,500 


71 


434,500 


71 


19,000 


Lexington, 








4,740 


352,900 


77 


356,800 


75 


3,900 


Nahant, . 








2,290 


152,000 


65 


158,800 


69 


6,800 


Swampscott, 








7,310 


427,700 


59 


443,300 


61 


15,600 


District, 


1,086,690 


109,994,800 


105 


116,230,700 


107 


6,235,900 



Included in above quantities is 34,971,000 gallons supplied to Hyde Park from local sources which were 
discontinued February 5. 



102 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The consumption in the several districts was as follows : — 



Gallons 

per Day, 

1912. 



Increase 

(Gallons 

per Day). 



Percent- 
age of 
Increase. 



Southern low-service district, embracing the low-service district of 
Boston, with the exception of Charlestown and East Boston, 

Northern low-service district, embracing the low-service districts 
of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett, Arlington, 
Charlestown and East Boston 

Southern high-service district, embracing Quincy and Watertown, 
the high-service districts of Boston, 2 and portions of Belmont 
and Milton, 

Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Revere, Win- 
throp, Swampscott, Nahant and Stoneham, and the high-service 
districts of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett and 
East Boston 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the higher portions 
of Hyde Park, Milton and West Roxbury, 

Northern extra high-service district, embracing Lexington and the 
higher portions of Arlington and Belmont, 

Totals, 



49,651,100 
24,099,000 
32,941,100 

7,826,100 
837,400 
876,000 



116,230,700 



4,230,500 
632,9001 
2,009,500 

440,600 

147,300 

40,900 



6,235,900 



9.31 

2.56» 

6.50 

5.97 
21.34 

4.90 



6.67 



1 Decrease. 



2 Includes portion of Hyde Park.- 



The daily average and per capita consumption in each of the mu- 
nicipalities during each month of the year are given in Appendix Xo. 
2, Table 'No. 27. During the extremely cold weather in January, 
February and March a very large quantity of water was used or 
wasted to prevent freezing of service pipes. It is estimated that the 
quantity used for this purpose during the 10-week period from Jan- 
uary 6 to March 16, was 1,106,882,000 gallons, equivalent to 3,024,- 
000 gallons per day for the entire year. 

The red and black lines on the accompanying diagram show graph- 
ically the daily average consumption and the rate of consumption 
between the hours of one and four a.m. during each week of the years 
1911 and 1912. A comparison of these lines shows very clearly the 
great increase both in the daily average and in the rate of consump- 
tion, due to cold weather waste in January, February and March, 
1912, also an increase in consumption during June and July, 1912, 
due to high temperature and low rainfall. 



Metering of Service Pipes. 
The following table gives the statistics relative to the installation 
of water meters. 



Average Rate of Consumption 

IN 

Metropolitan Water District 

AND 

RAINFALL AND AVERAGE TEMPERATURE of AIR at CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR 

FOR 

EACH WEEK DURING 1912 



CONSUMPTION AND NIGHT RATE 

Jan Feb. Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct. Nov. Dec. 

6 13 20 27 3 10 17 M 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 n 4 11 18 25 I 8 15 22 29 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 5 12 IS 26 2 9 16 2330 7 14 21 28 

160 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I ; I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 ■! I 1 1 I 1 ) 1 I f 1 160 




RAINFALL IN INCHES 



cy>ito|<y^|fNj'*x>'coloi'«-[ — Iroi — 1oIcnjI^!cdi. 
kp o "^ — r- o o OJ rJ cjiro ro lA o^ lijiro 



i|?SS 



- 1 00 o o ohriO r 
► o CO rooo oioltoc^J <T> 



o| ■ o oloiol— |— ol'^l— |— 10|0|— iojd,— — I— |o,o|o|o|o|o|— |ni 0;0 o|o|— |o o o|c> ci|o o o|— o|— o|o|c) o|d|— 



•q-|mIffi'<.o|olco|<j5'u>|o!m|«-|t^|Ql^l'^l'J"|Ol<I>|c«;|Olirt 
fS. Tj- mio'o lO — ir- o — — o^ iflcJ ID o k© 01 O M 



AVERAGE WEEKLY TEMPERATURE 

Jan. Feb. Man Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 

e 13 20 27 3 10 IT 24 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 4 II 18 25 1 8 15 22 29 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 5 12 19 26 2 9 It 23 30 7 14 2J 28 

90| I i I I I I I I I I I I I I I M ! II I r-r 




Averages for 1911 shown in Red 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



103 



CiTT OR Town. 


Number of Meters re- 
quired to be set on Old 
Services Each Year. 


Meters set 


ON Old Serv 


ICES. 


1 

.S 
K 

o 

'> 


•73 
So 


1 

S 

o 

Q 

s . 

xn 


s 

% 

Q 

(U 
w 

& . 

« - 

m CO 


oco 

ma 




1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


Per Cen 
meterec 
1912. 


Boston, 


4,225 


84 


5,503 


5,481 


6,487 


6,022 


4,4672 


2,9403 


99,270 


34,565 


34.82 


Somerville, . . 


411 


732 


621 


501 


570 


488 


362 


236 


12,596 


7,171 


56.93 


Maiden, 


14 


43 


62 


8 


2 


- 


59 


126 


7,672 


7,400 


96.45 


Chelsea, 


240 


198 


756 


779 


1,092 


132 


190 


190 


4,682 


4,574 


97.69 


Everett, 


252 


338 


255 


277 


285 


215 


121 


117 


5,579 


1,891 


33.89 


Quincy, 


230 


358 


33 


423 


1,680 


1,090 


436 


241 


8,176 


6,130 


74.98 


Medford, . 


179 


857 


927 


1,555 


178 


6 


236 


218 


4,793 


4,764 


100.00 


Melrose, 


119 


2,432 


135 


7 


5 


- 


91 


91 


3,699 


3,949 


100.00 


Revere, 


138 


85 


184 


110 


176 


154 


189 


183 


3,759 


1,598 


42.51 


Watertown, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


100 


103 


2,251 


2,233 


100.00 


Arlington, . 


55 


108 


56 


63 


127 


261 


134 


160 


2,105 


1,957 


92.97 


Milton, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


83 


83 


1,587 


1,587 


100.00 


Winthrop, . 


100 


213 


975 


706 


6 


- 


102 


99 


2,655 


2,586 


100.00 


Stoneham, 


65 


116 


225 


186 


155 


252 


27 


32 


1,501 


1,105 


73.62 


Belmont, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


130 


127 


1,135 


1,135 


100.00 


Lexington, 


32 


113 


70 


66 


86 


95 


80 


42 


961 


752 


78.25 


Nahant, 


16 


30 


40 


26 


18 


17 


35 


35 


590 


336 


56.95 


Swampscott, 


21 


264 


142 


28 


13 


- 


92 


92 


1,627 


1,627 


100.00 


Totals, . 


6,097 


5,971 


9,984 


10,206 


10,880 


8,732 


6,934 


5,115 


164,638 


85,360 


51.77 



1 The number of new meters installed and the number of new services equipped with meters seldom 
agree exactly for the reason that service pipes are installed but meters are not set until the buildings are 
permanently occupied. 

Includes 2 2,562 services and 3 1,540 meters acquired by the annexation of Hyde Park. 



In all the cities and towns of the Metropolitan Water District, with 
the exception of the town of Revere, the number of services now 
metered is in excess of the requirements of chapter 52 of the Acts of 
1907, which requires at least 5 per cent, of the number not metered 
on December 31, 1907, to be metered each year thereafter. At the 
end of 1912, 51.77 per cent, of all the services in use in the Metro- 
politan District were metered, and 77.50 per cent, of the services in 
the cities and towns outside of Boston. 

Meters have been generally installed throughout the Charlestown 
district of Boston during the past year, and although they have not 
yet been used in assessing the water rates, readings of the meters 



104 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



have been furnished to the water takers, and as a result the daily 
average consumption of the district has been reduced from 7,528,000 
gallons to 6,860,000 gallons. In the East Boston district, where 
meters were installed in 1910, the daily average consumption in 1912 
was 4,416,200 gallons, a reduction of 1,756,400 gallons in two years, 
equivalent to about 30 gallons per capita. 



Water supplied Outside the Metropolitan District. 

In addition to the quantity supplied to the cities and towns com- 
prising the Metropolitan Water District, 424,186,100 gallons of 
water have been drawn from the Metropolitan Works for supplying 
places outside the District, as follows : — 



Places supplied. 


Total 
Quantity 
(GaUons). 


Average 

Daily 
Quantity 
(Gallons). 


Times during which 
Water was supplied. 


Amounts 
charged 

for 

Water 

supplied. 


Westborough State Hospital, 
Town of Framingham: — 

From Sudbury Aqueduct, 

From Filter Gallery at Farm Pond, . 

Town of Wakefield 

United States Government: — 
Peddock's Island 

Town of Saugus, ..'... 


62,749,000 

11,600,000 

288,400,000 
13,327,000 

41,698,700 
6,411,400 


171,445 

31,694 • 

787,978 
36,400 

113,900 
17,500 


January, 25 days, 
February, 26 days, 
March, 11 days, . 
September, 1 day, 
October, 3 days, . 

Jan. 1 to 23, . 


Sl,882 47 

278 40 

551 58 

932 89 

2,621 33 
340 00 



Quality of Water. 

About 80 per cent, of the water used in the Metropolitan District 
during the past year was drawn from the Wachusett Reservoir and 
20 per cent, from the Sudbury and Cochituate sources. The corre- 
sponding proportions in 1911 were 60 and 40 per cent. The use of 
an increased proportion from the Wachusett source has resulted in 
an improvement in the color of the water supplied to the District. 
In other respects the quality of the water has been substantially the 
same as during recent years. 

The number of microscopical organisms present in the water has 
been above the average but the water supplied to the District has 
not contained objectionable tastes or odors in sufficient degree to 
cause complaint. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 105 

Weekly microscopical and bacterial examinations have been made 
in the laboratory of the Board, and chemical examinations have been 
furnished by the State Board of Health. There have been made 
2,441 microscopical and 1,335 bacterial examinations of the water 
from various parts of the works, and the results of 408 chemical 
examinations have been received from the State Board of Health. 

In the Wachusett Reservoir, from which the greater part of the 
supply was drawn, there were on June 25, 150 units of Uroglena, 
causing a distinctly oily odor which lasted only one week. On Sep- 
tember 17, 165 units of Dinobryon and 40 units of Synura were 
present in the surface sample, and the growth of Dinobryon increased 
from week to week, reaching a maximum of 740 units on October 15, 
causing a faintly fishy odor. This organism continued in the reser- 
voir the remainder of the year, but in such small numbers that the 
taste and odor of the water were not affected. 

The Sudbury Reservoir was free from objectionable organisms 
until April, when Asterionella appeared, but not in sufficient num- 
bers to cause any taste or odor. During May a groAvth of Uroglena 
appeared, reaching a maximum of 880 units on May 21, which caused 
a decidedly oily odor, but lasted only two weeks. This was followed 
by a growth of Dinobryon which continued through the month of 
June, and during August, September and October there was a growth 
of Chlamydomonas. ISTone of these growths caused any trouble. 

Eramingham Reservoir 'No. 3 was generally free from objection- 
able organisms throughout the year, although the organisms present 
in the Sudbury Reservoir were also found in this reservoir in small 
numbers. 

Whitehall Reservoir contained growths of Dinobryon and Uroglena 
in January and March, which gave the water a disagreeable odor for 
short periods, but no water was drawn from this source. 

During the year the Ashland and Hopkinton reservoirs were 
free from any growths of organisms in sufficient quantities to cause 
objectionable taste or odor. 

The water in Eramingham Reservoir No. 2 was free from objec- 
tionable taste or odor until the last of October, when a growth of 
Dinobryon appeared in the water at the upper end of the reservoir 
and gave it a decidedly fishy odor. This growth continued through 
IN'ovember but did not reach the reservoir outlet. 

Aphanizomenon was present in large numbers in the water of 



106 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Lake Cochituate throughout the year, and for a considerable portion 
of this time in sufficient quantity to give a disagreeable odor to the 
water when heated. Growths of Uroglena appeared in June and 
October. For the greater part of the year the water of the lake had, 
when heated, an odor from faintly to distinctly disagreeable. 

There were growths of Dinobryon, Synura, Uroglena, Aste- 
rionella and Chlamydomonas in the distributing reservoirs, but the 
growths were not large and continued for but short periods. Synura 
was present in Spot Pond from February until May 1, giving the 
water at that time a distinctly oily taste. 

The few complaints received from water takers regarding the qual- 
ity of the water as drawn from the taps appeared to be due to the 
presence in the mains of amorphous matter and Crenothrix. 

The following table gives a comparison of the average results of 
the examinations of water from a tap in Boston for the years 1903 to 
1912, inclusive: — 







1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


State Board of Health 






















Examinations. 






















Color (Nessler standard), . 


0.25 


0.231 


0.241 


0.241 


0.221 


0.191 


0.181 


0.141 


0.251 


0.171 


Total residue, 


3.98 


3.93 


3.86 


3.86 


3.83 


3.50 


3.46 


3.05 


4.18 


3.86 


Loss on ignition, . 


1.50 


1.59 


1.59 


1.39 


1.40 


1.35 


1.43 


1.24 


1.66 


1.23 


Free ammonia, 


0.0013 


0.0023 


0.0020 


O.OOIS 


0.0013 


0.0011 


0.0011 


0.0013 


0.0015 


0.0018 


imroSf (d^'-i-d' '■ 


0.0125 


0.0139 


0.0145 


0.0159 


0.0129 


0.0115 


0.0128 


0.0118 


0.0156 


0.0154 


0.0110 


0.0121 


0.0124 


0.0134 


0.0109 


0.0092 


0.0103 


0.0102 


0.0128 


0.0119 


ammoma. [suspended, . 


0.0015 


0.0018 


0.0021 


0.0025 


0.0020 


0.0024 


0.0025 


0.0016 


0.0029 


0.0034 


Chlorine, . . 


0.30 


0.34 


0.35 


0.34 


0.33 


0.33 


0.28 


0.28 


0.38 


0.36 


Nitrogen as nitrates, . 


0.0142 


0.0110 


0.0083 


0.0054 


0.0068 


0.0092 


0.0034 


0.0030 


0.0029 


0.0062 


Nitrogen as nitrites. 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0000 


0.0000 


0.0000 


0.0000 


Oxygen consumed. 


0.39 


0.37 


0.35 


0.36 


0.32 


0.26 


0.25 


0.22 


0.33 


0.29 


Hardness, .... 


1.5 


1.5 


1.4 


1.3 


1.3 


1.2 


1.3 


1.1 


1.4 


1.7 


Metropolitan Water and Sew- 






















erage Board Examinations. 






















Color (platinum standard),. 


.35 


.32 


.28 


.25 


.27 


.22 


.23 


.18 


.22 


.17 


Turbidity, . 


2.2 


2.4 


1.9 


2.2 


2.2 


2.4 


2.6 


2.1 


2.2 


2.2 


Total organisms, . 


286 


303 


528 


550 


427 


695 


1,959 


421 


735 


967 


Amorphous matter. 


36 


36 


37 


42 


47 


64 


97 


72 


76 


141 


Bacteria, .... 


126 


176 


231 


154 


176 


148 


195 


213 


197 


259 



Note. — Chemical analyses are in parts per 100,000, organisms and amorphous matter in standard units 
per cubic centimeter, and bacteria in number per cubic centimeter. The standard unit has an area of 400 
square microns, and by its use the number of diatomacese are decreased, and the number of chlorophycese 
and cyanophycese are very much increased, as compared with the number of organisms. 

1 Platinum standard. 



Sanitary Inspection. 
The grounds connected with the several supply and distributing 
reservoirs have been policed for the purpose of preventing the pollu- 
tion of the supply or injury to the property of the Board, special 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 107 

watchmen being employed to patrol the grounds during the bathing 
and camping season. 

At the Wachusett Reservoir one man was arrested for violation of 
the fishing permit and was fined $10. Three men were arrested for 
hunting on the marginal lands about the Wachusett Reservoir, and 
each was fined $20. 

In the Sudbury Department four young men were prosecuted for 
bathing in Framingham Reservoir "No. S, and they were placed on 
probation. One man and two boys were prosecuted for bathing in 
Framingham Reservoir No. 2 ; the man was fined $3 and the boys 
were placed on probation. Two men prosecuted for bathing in the 
Sudbury Reservoir were fined $5 each. One man was prosecuted for 
bathing in the Sudbury River and the case placed on file. Five men 
and five boys were detected fishing in Lake Cochituate; one of the 
men was prosecuted and the case placed on file; one boy was prose- 
cuted and placed on probation, and four boys were reprimanded and 
their parents notified. 

The results of the inspection of the watersheds are given in the 
following tables : — 



108 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



109 



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O 



o 



no METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

There has been an increase in the number of occupied premises 
on all of the watersheds, but the number of unsatisfactory cases has 
been reduced about 8 per cent. Under the heading ^' Unsatisfactory '' 
are included all cases where it is possible that under the most unfa- 
vorable conditions drainage from privies or sinks may reach a water 
course, all suspected cases and all cases of manufacturing wastes 
entering feeders, even though there may have been some attempt at 
previous purification. The increase in the occupied premises is due to 
a continued growth in the industrial development, which was men- 
tioned in the report for 1911. On the Wachusett watershed there 
has been a net gain of 31 premises. Increased business has been 
carried on at the mills of the Jefferson Manufacturing Company and 
at the Woods Mill at Quinepoxet Village, and as a result the manu- 
facturing wastes discharged into the river have been largely increased. 
The Dawson Mill, in Holden, which has been idle for several years, 
is now undergoing repairs and it is expected that it will be operated 
for the manufacture of satinets early in 1913. 

Plans and estimates of cost are now being made for works for the 
purification of sewage and manufacturing wastes from the dwellings 
and factories in the town of Holden and it is desirable that their 
construction should be undertaken in the hear future. 

The industrial growth on the Cochituate watershed at South Eram- 
ingham and vicinity has continued. The Ames Plow Company began 
manufacturing early in the year and now employs about 300 men; 
the Dennison Manufacturing Company has erected a large 4-story 
addition; the Gurney Heater Company is building an addition to 
its factory and the Standard Woven Eabric Company has recently 
begun the erection of a large factory on Clark Street. One hundred 
and fifty-eight new buildings, designed for the occupancy of 216 
families, 13 stores, 3 factories, 2 garages and 1 hospital have been 
completed, and about 25 other buildings are now under construction. 
Twenty houses have also been built in Ashland, 5 in Sherborn and 
32 in i^atick. 

The building of sewers to provide for the drainage from the village 
of Lokerville was authorized by the town of Eramingham in August. 
Construction has not been commenced but it is expected that the 
work will be done early in the coming season. There are now about 
190 houses which will be connected with these sewers. 

In the cities and towns on the Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



Ill 



which have systems of sewerage conveying the sewage outside the 
watersheds the number of premises connected with the sewers has 
been increased by 152, and the number existing on streets where 
sewers have been built has been reduced from 127 to 102. The num- 
ber in the several places on December 31, 1912, was as follows : — 





Premises connected 
WITH Sewers. 


Premises not connected 
WITH Sewers. 




1911. 


1912. 


1911. 


1912. 


Marlborough, 


1,537 


1,560 


71 


55 


Westborough, 


518 . 


526 


19 


15 


Framingham, 


1,197 


1,280 


5 


4 


Natick, 


685 


723 


32 


28 


Sherborn, 


5 


5 


- 


- 


Totals, 


3,942 


4,094 


127 


102 



Seven cases of typhoid fever were reported on the Wachusett water- 
shed, 6 of which were from Holden and 1 near Sterling Junction; 
and 23 cases on the Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds, of which 
14 were from Hopkinton, 2 from Westborough, 1 from Southbor- 
ough, 2 from Marlborough, 2 from Framingham and 2 from I^a- 
tick. ]N^one of the cases occurred on premises where the conditions 
were such as to endanger the water supply, but in all cases the prem- 
ises were inspected and precautions taken to prevent the spread of 
the disease or the pollution of the water supply. 

The premises temporarily occupied by men employed in pipe laying 
and on other public work have been inspected and the work super- 
vised in order to see that proper sanitary regulations were enforced. 



Swamp Ditches and Brooks. 

The ditches draining swamps on the several watersheds, having 
an aggregate length of 36.36 miles have been cleaned as usual, and 
the weeds and brush mowed and burned for a width of from 10 to 20 
feet on both sides of the ditches. Ditches in Big and Little Crane, 
Brigham and Boylston swamps, which had been damaged by cattle, 
have been repaired by reshaping and repaving the slopes for a dis- 
tance of about 25,000 feet, at a cost of $1,097.15. 

One hundred and seventy feet of standard board bottom ditch, 



112 



^METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



with a settling basin 25 feet long having concrete bulkheads at either 
end and lined with paving, were constructed on Byard's Brook where 
it enters the open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct, to prevent 
further washing away of the brook bed and the obstructing of the 
flow of water in the open channel at this point. The construction of 
a channel for French Brook for a distance of 213 feet on land 
formerly of Clephane A. Lord has drained the swampy piece of land 
alongside the Worcester-Clinton highway and improved its appear- 
ance. The labor on this work cost $0.45 per linear foot, the material 
being furnished from stock on hand. 

A concrete bulkhead 8 inches thick was constructed across the lower 
end of the I line in Big Crane Swamp, to replace the original wooden 
one. One farm bridge over Brigham Pond ditch was rebuilt of chest- 
nut lumber. 

The channel of the brook running through the city of Marlborough 
and discharging into the Marlborough filter-beds was cleaned for a 
distance of 4,700 feet. 

Observations have been continued of the colors of the waters enter- 
ing the reservoir from swamps which have been improved by ditching, 
with the following results : — 





Area of 
Water- 
shed 
(Acres). 


Area of 
Swamp 
(Acres). 


Length 

of 
Ditches 
(Feet). 


Colors of Waters (Platinum Standard). 




BEFORE DRAINING. 


AFTER DRAINING. 


SWAMP. 


Averages 

for Years 

1894, 1895, 

1899. 


Averages 

for Years 

1900, 1901, 

1902. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


Crane, 
No. 54, . 
No. 55, . 

No. 76, . 


1,856 
750 

1,625 
525 


460 
72 

220 
26 


45,250 
8,930 

27,661 
6,173 


1.95 


.90 

1.27 

^44 


.72 
.41 
.44 
.24 


.64 
.33 
.36 
.20 


.65 
.36 
.38 
.21 


.60 
.44 
.47 
.29 


1.16 
.58 
.59 
.43 



Protection of the Supply by Filtration. 

The several filter-beds which are maintained for the purpose of 
purifying the water collected in streams draining through populated 
districts before its admission to the storage reservoirs have been cared 
for as usual. 

The Marlborough Brook filter-beds, having an area of 14 acres, on 
which are filtered the water received from about 1.8 square miles of 
the more thickly settled portions of the city of Marlborough, cared 



Xo. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 113 

for all the water received during the year, except on February 22 
and 23 and March 13, when small quantities overflowed from the beds 
into the reservoir. The settling reservoir in which the water is re- 
ceived and from which it flows to the filter-beds, was cleaned in June, 
and 1,200 cubic yards of material, which had been deposited during 
two years, was removed at a cost of 43 cents per cubic yard. The 5.36 
acres of artificial beds were cleaned in June and July, and again in 
October and J^ovember, while the natural beds were thoroughly 
cleaned in June, and the grass and weeds on these beds mowed and 
burned in ISTovember. Isew weirs, frames and covers have been made 
and placed at each of the 17 artificial beds, and such other repairs 
made as were necessary to maintain the beds in good condition. 

The filter-beds on Earm Street received diluted sewage from the 
overflow of the Marlborough main sewer on two days in January, 
four days in February, ten days in March and thirteen days in 
April. 

At the Pegan Brook pumping station, where the surface drainage 
from an area of about 1 square mile in the thickly settled portion of 
Xatick is pumped upon filter-beds before entering Lake Cochituate, 
the pumps were operated 199 days during the year and 290,908,000 
gallons of sewage were pumped, equivalent to a daily average of 794,- 
831 gallons. The quantity of coal used was 173,962 pounds, and 
1,672 gallons of water were pumped per pound of coal. The cost of 
operating the station, cleaning the filter-beds and caring for the 
grounds was $3,368.47, making the cost per million gallons treated 
$11.58. One of the boilers at the pumping station was retubed at 
a cost of $85, the other boiler having been repaired in a similar 
manner during the previous year. All of the water from Pegan 
Brook was pumped to the filter-beds, except for a few hours on Feb- 
ruary 22 and March 13, when about 2,000,000 gallons flowed directly 
into the lake. About 28,000,000 gallons also flowed directly to the 
lake from the intercepting ditch, during seven days in February and 
eight days in March. 

Four fllter-beds, having a combined area of 2 acres, have received 
and cared for all the water flowing from an area of 525 acres in the 
village of Sterling. During the fall the surface of the beds was seri- 
ously clogged by pomace and mother from the plant of the Sterling 
Cider Company. The Company has now constructed on its own 
premises a settling tank and filter designed to prevent further trouble. 



114 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The Gates Terrace filter-beds at Sterling Junction, on which is 
received the drainage from a few summer cottages, were operated 
from April 13 to October 31. The filter-beds on which is received 
the sewage from the Worcester County Training School, have re- 
ceived the usual attention. The small filter-bed on which is received 
the discharge from the swimming pool at the Sudbury Reservoir has 
received the necessary care. 

FOEESTRY. 

But little planting has been done during the past year as there 
was no mature stock in the nurseries. About 1,650 white pines from 
2 to 4 feet high were taken from along the shore of the Wachusett 
Reservoir, near Hastings Cove, and planted on 1% acres of meadow 
land on the northerly side of the Clinton-Boylston highway near the 
South Dike. Six maple trees were planted on grounds at the Sud- 
bury Dam. The nursery which is maintained at Oakdale in con- 
nection with the Wachusett Department, has been given the necessary 
care and at the close of the year contained : — 

21,300 3-year-old white pine seedlings, transplanted. 
113,900 3-year-old white pine seedlings furnished by the State Forester. 
1,000 2-year-old white pine seedlings, transplanted. 
37,100 2-year-old white pine seedlings. 
48,200 1-year-old Avhite pine seedlings. 
200 1-year-old sequoia seedlings. 

A nursery has been established in Southborough in connection 
with the Sudbury Department, which at the end of the year con- 
tained between 73,000 and 74,000 3-year-old white pines which are 
the remainder of 125,000 seedlings received from the State Forester's 
department in May. The loss of the seedlings was largely caused by 
the grub of the May beetle. 

At the Wachusett Reservoir the small trees and brush were removed 
from 27 acres, which had been planted with white pines, at a cost of 
$255, and about 147 acres on which the trees had been destroyed by 
forest fires in 1911 and 1912 have been cleared preparatory to re- 
planting with white pines. The amount expended for this clearing 
was $4,163.93, and the receipts for the wood sold amounted to 
$2,268.45, in addition to which $3,000 was paid by the Boston & 
Maine Railroad as damages on account of the fire. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 115 

The protection of the trees from the ravages of destructive insects 
has necessitated the expenditure of $9,609.79, as follows: — 

Spot Pond, $1,869 93 

Mystic Lake, 57 75 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 656 22 

Weston Reservoir, 1,157 44 

Sudbury, Coehituate and Weston aqueducts, 1,129 50 

Lake Coehituate, 708 48 

Sudbury Reservoir, 647 75 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3, 431 72 

Wachusett Reservoir and Aqueduct, 2,951 00 



$9,609 79 



This amount is $2,547.58 in excess of the cost of similar work for 
the previous year, and the increased cost was incurred entirely in 
the Sudbury and Wachusett departments. 

During the past two or three years the gypsy moth has made rapid 
progress in infesting the lands of the Board at Lake Coehituate and 
at the reservoirs in Framingham and Southborough. It has also been 
found in small numbers at several points around the Wachusett Res- 
ervoir. The cost of protecting the trees within the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict was about $1,100 less than for the preceding year, as the work 
was more economically and effectively done by the use of the spraying 
machine which was purchased early in 1911. 

During the winter season the egg clusters of the gypsy moth were 
painted with creosote, and the nests of the brown-tail moth cut off and 
burned. Beginning on June 4, the trees on about 77 acres of land 
were sprayed at Spot Pond, 26 acres at the Weston Reservoir and 
smaller areas at Chestnut Hill, Mystic Lake, and the old Mystic 
pumping station. The elm trees were also sprayed in order to destroy 
the elm-leaf beetle. 

In the Sudbury Department the work of tree protection has con- 
sisted of painting egg clusters with creosote, cutting and burning 
the nests of the brown-tail moth, burlapping trees and killing caterpil- 
lars. 'No spraying was done except at the Sudbury Reservoir, where 
the elm trees have been sprayed with arsenate of lead to destroy the 
elm-leaf beetle. This was done by the town of Southborough at the 
expense of the Board. 

On the Wachusett works the gypsy moth was found in larger num- 



116 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

bers than in any previous year, but the numbers are still small as 
compared with those localities where the trees are thickly infested. 
All egg clusters have been painted with creosote mixture, except those 
on trees in Crane Swamp in ^NTorthborough and Westborough. The 
nests of the brown-tail moth have been cut off and burned along the 
open channel, on the grounds at the Wachusett Dam and along the 
main highways. The young white pine trees on 1,242 acres of the 
marginal lands were inspected twice during the year and the shoots 
which were infested with the pine-tree weevil were cut off and burned. 
The number of infested shoots was less than during any of the pre- 
vious five vears. 

The chestnut trees on all lands belonging to the Board in the 
Wachusett Department have been carefully inspected for the chest- 
nut bark disease. The trees at one point along the open channel of 
the Wachusett Aqueduct in Marlborough, near the Wachusett Dam, 
and at three points on the marginal lands of the Wachusett Reservoir 
have been found to be seriously affected. The only means of pre- 
venting the spread of this disease appears to lie in cutting all the 
chestnut trees within the affected area. As the presence of the dis- 
ease is general throughout the Wachusett Department the ultimate 
cutting out of all the chestnut trees seems inevitable. On November 
30 a gang of men began cutting the trees from an area of about 48 
acres, composed largely of mature chestnuts, where numerous cases 
of the disease were found in an advanced stage. 

The number of forest fires which occurred on the watersheds was 
less than during the preceding year. The number reported from the 
Wachusett Department was 13, causing an estimated damage of 
$925 ; and from the Sudbury Department 6, with an estimated dam- 
age of $80. The fires causing the greater portion of the damage 
occurred near the Wachusett Reservoir on July 13 and 28. On July 
13, 914 acres were burned over near Hastings Cove, destroying 
4,300 white pines, and on July 28, 27.7 acres were burned near 
Kendall Cove, in West Boylston and Sterling, destroying 10,000 
white pines. Both of these fires were probably started by berry 
pickers. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 117 



DiSTKIBUTING ReSEKVOIRS. 

Weston Reservoir. 
This reservoir, with its connected structures and grounds, together 
with the aqueduct leading to the terminal chamber and the terminal 
chamber grounds, have been cared for by an attendant and three 
laborers. 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 

Work at this reservoir during the year consisted mainly of caring 
for the walks, drives, shrubbery and lawns. The foot path around 
the Lawrence Basin has been resurfaced for a distance of 500 feet 
with fine crushed stone obtained from a spoil pile at the tunnel on the 
Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains. The ironwork connected with the 
several gate-houses has been scraped and painted. The policing of 
the grounds has cost $505.36. 

Wahan Hill Reservoir, 

The outside slopes of the embankment have been given a dressing 
of stable manure and the ironwork of the gate-house has been painted. 

Forbes Hill Reservoir and Standpipe, 
On February 13 and 14, 3,405,600 gallons of water were drawn 
from this reservoir and its surface lowered from 191.62 to 181.44, 
in order to supply the city of Quincy while repairing a break in 
the 24-inch main supplying Milton and Quincy. A portion of 
the supply in Quincy was drawn from the reservoir on October 6, 
and on October 20, 1,099,000 gallons were drawn from the reservoir 
during the making of a connection between mains at the corner of 
Morton and Sanford streets in Dorchester. The standpipe was out 
of service from ISTovember 10 to December 7, during which time its 
interior was painted with three coats of red lead and linseed oil, and 
the exterior was given one coat of tinted white lead and oil. The 
woodwork of the tower and the iron stairway were also painted. The 
work was done by the George Dietz Company at a cost of $430. 

Mystic Reservoir, 
This reservoir has been in use throughout the year. 



118 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Mystic Lake and Pumping Station. 
Mystic Lake has remained under the police control of the Metro- 
politan Park Commission. The old engines, boilers and other ma- 
chinery from the pumping station were sold for junk and removed. 

Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs, 
During the extremely cold weather in January and February the 
surface of Spot Pond was lowered about 1 foot on account of the 
water being drawn to supply the excessive use in the Metropolitan 
District. From the middle of March until the first of October the 
pond remained at or near high-water mark. During October and 
Xovember water was drawn from the pond to supply the Metropolitan 
District while repairs were in progress at Echo Bridge on the Sud- 
bury Aqueduct, and its surface was lowered about 2 feet. From 
December 1 until the close of the year the surface of the pond stood 
at or above high water. One set of screens has been renewed at the 
east gate-house at Spot Pond and one set at the gate-house at Fells 
Reservoir. The ironwork of the several gate-houses has been painted. 
The grounds have been kept in good order and policed at a cost of 
$1,243.12. 

Chelsea Reservoir, 
In 1904 an arrangement was made by the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board with the Chelsea Water Board under which this 
Board repaired the reservoir lining, with the understanding that it 
should have the right to use the water when necessary for supplying 
the other cities in the District in addition to Chelsea. The repairs 
made at that time consisted of the placing on the inner slope of the 
reservoir a new and heavier lining of Portland cement concrete to a 
vertical depth of about 6 feet below the top of the embankment. The 
reservoir having shown indications of leakage during the year 1911, 
it was found on examination that the lining was in poor condition 
where the work done in 1904 joined the original construction. A 
strip from 2 to 8 inches in width and from 1% to 6 inches in depth 
was dug out entirely around the reservoir, a distance of about 415 
feet, and refilled with concrete made with Portland cement, Plum 
Island sand and fine crushed stone mixed in the proportions of 1, 2 
and 4, to which was added 4 pounds of Hydrotite water-proofing to 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 119 

each barrel of cement. The reservoir was cleaned and minor repairs 
made, the total cost of the repairs being $332.39. The repairs were 
made between June 13 and July 8 and since the latter date the reser- 
voir has shown no signs of leakage. 

Pipe Yakds. 
The buildings at both the Chestnut Hill and Glenwood pipe yards 
are in good condition. The side track at Chestnut Hill, used for the 
delivery of coal and cast iron pipe, has been repaired at a cost of 
$140.63, and that at the Glenwood yard at a cost of $62.56. 

Pipe Lines. 
The length of pipes owned and operated by the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board was increased by 0.15 of a mile during the 
year, making a total on December 31, 1912, of 101.73 miles. The 
length of mains 4 inches in diameter and larger connected with the 
works, but owned and operated by the several cities and towns sup- 
plied with water, is 1,745.9 miles. 

Mystic Tunnel Extension. 

The most important work done during the past year in connection 
with the maintenance of the pipe lines has been made necessary 
by the construction, by the city of Boston, of a wider channel at a 
new location in connection with the north channel of the Mystic 
River between Charlestown and Chelsea. This made necessary 
the extension of the tunnel through which the 24-inch wat^r pipe 
is carried under the river channel. By arrangement with the city of 
Boston the work was done by the Board by day-labor, under the im- 
mediate supervision of Mr. C. A. Haskin, who, in 1900, built the 
tunnel which has now been extended. 

Work connected with the removal of the old and the laying of th( 
new pipes, including the covering and boxing of same, has been done 
by the maintenance force. x 

The extension of the tunnel begins at the location of the shaft at 
the Charlestown end of the old tunnel and extends v/esterly for about 
273 feet toward Charlestown, ending in a shaft about 415 feet from 
the east shaft of the old tunnel, which remains in service. The 
extension is, like the old tunnel, circular in section, 6 feet in interior 



120 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

diameter, built of brick masonry 12 inches in thickness, except where 
built in solid rock, where the invert is 8 inches thick. The centre 
line of the tunnel is about 431/2 feet below mean low water. The 
shaft is also 6 feet in interior diameter with walls 12 inches thick, 
and extends to 14.7 feet above mean low water. The upper 38 feet 
of the shaft is protected by a steel casing 8 feet 2 inches in diameter, 
made of plates %-inch in thickness. This casing extends about 15 
feet into the silt bed of the river and the shaft is protected by a cir- 
cular guard composed of 42 oak piles strongly bolted together. 

The 24-inch pipes in the old tunnel were found to be in poor con- 
dition below high water and have been entirely replaced. In relay- 
ing the pipes the curves at the bottom of the shafts were embedded in 
concrete and the pipes through the tunnel supported on brick piers 8 
inches in thickness, spaced about 6 feet apart. The manhole curve at 
the top of each shaft is secured to the curve at the bottom of the shaft 
by two 1%-inch diameter vertical rods, and to the pile foundation by 
two lV2"iiich rods carried back horizontally about 60 feet. For the 
purpose of preventing the deterioration of the pipes by the action 
of salt water and electrolysis they were covered with a %-inch coat- 
ing of slaked lime, which was in turn covered with a li/2-inch coating 
composed of equal parts of Portland cement and sand. 

The work of setting up the boilers, air compressors, electric light 
plant, hoisting engines, pumps, etc., was begun on March 8, and 
during the week ending March 23 the water was pumped out of the 
old tunnel, the old pipes removed from the shaft and a brick bulk- 
head 24 inches thick built into the tunnel about 12 feet from the 
shaft. An air lock was then bolted to the top of the shaft and on 
April 1 the air pressure was applied. The brick lining was then 
removed at the bottom of the shaft and the work of driving the tunnel 
extension began on April 8. Rock was encountered in the lower part 
of the heading and rose as the heading advanced until at a distance of 
24 feet from the centre of the old shaft the tunnel was entirely in 
rock and so continued for a distance of 200 feet. The work of lining 
the tunnel with brick was commenced on April 13 and both excavation 
and lining were carried forward at the rate of about 2 feet in 24 
hours until July 17, when the brick lining had been advanced 206.5 
feet beyond the old shaft. A brick bulkhead was then built near the 
end of the finished brickwork and the lined portion of the tunnel 
cleaned, plastered with cement mortar and washed with cement grout. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 121 

A concrete bulkhead reinforced with steel rails was then built into 
the old shaft, above the tunnel, and on July 25 the removal of the- 
brickwork of the old shaft was commenced. When this had been 
partially done an attempt was made to raise the steel casing of the 
shaft with its brick lining by means of a powerful lighter, aided by 
compressed air in the shaft. This proving unsuccessful the shaft 
was left in place until the piles surrounding it were removed, and 
on [N'ovember 30 it was raised by the lighter of the Merritt-Chapman 
Company and placed on the pier at the JSTaval Hospital near by. 
The brickwork was then removed from the casing and the steel sold 
for junk. 

The circular guard of oak piles surrounding the new shaft was 
built by the George T. Rendle Company between April 20 and May 
18. The steel shaft casing, composed of four sections, each 91^ feet 
long, was set up on the lighter and two of the sections were lined with 
brick. On May 20 the casing was lowered into position by the use of 
the lighter. The brick lining was then completed. On August 9 
the hoisting engine and air lock were removed from the old shaft and 
set up at the new shaft. The air pressure was applied to the new 
shaft on August 10 and the brick lining of the shaft completed to the 
finished grade on August 16. Quicksand was encountered at the bot- 
tom of the shaft. The bottom was covered with a flooring of 2-inch 
plank on which was placed Portland cement concrete 18 inches in 
thickness. Tunnel excavation from the new shaft was begun August 
16 and the tunnel lining was finished September 1. The air pressure 
was removed on September 3 for a short time for the purpose of test- 
ing the tightness of the masonry. On September 6 the air pressure 
was finally taken off. The work was carried on continuously day 
and night, a force averaging 16 men being employed on each of the 
three shifts. In order to comply with the law limiting the hours of 
labor to 48 per week, and at the same time carry on the work con- 
tinuously, additional laborers and machinists were employed. The 
pipe line was finished on November 30 and placed in service on De- 
cember 7. The cost of this work to December 31 was as follows : — 



122 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Tunnel construction : — 

Labor, $29,013 02 

Materials and supplies, 15,367 63 

Engineering, 2,200 63 



$46,581 28 



Laying 24-inch pipe in tunnel and 30-inch pipe in pipe box : - 

Labor, $1,909 46 

Pipe and specials, 1,252 31 

Supplies, 1,052 37 



4,214 14 



Amount to be paid by city of Boston, $50,795 42 

Removing and relaying 24-inch pipe in old tunnel: — 

Labor, $2,523 89 

Pipe and specials, 809 22 

Supplies, 930 62 

4,263 73 

Total cost of work, $55,059 15 

Fox Hill Bridge over Saugus River. 

The construction of a reinforced concrete bridge,, supported on 
granite piers, in place of an existing pile structure crossing the Sau- 
gus River between Saugus and Lynn, together with the substitution 
of earth filling for a portion of the old bridge, made necessary the 
lowering of the siphon at the river channel and the relaying of the 
pipe crossing the bridge. 

The Snare &; Triest Company of IN^ew York is rebuilding the bridge 
under the direction of the County Commissioners of Essex County. 
A contract for doing the dredging required for lowering the siphon 
about 4 feet was made with this Company on June 27, the work of 
supporting and lowering the siphon box being done by the mainte- 
nance force. This portion of the work was done during the months 
of July and August at a cost of about $1,660, the siphon box being 
lowered so that the top of the siphon is now 14 feet below Boston 
city base. 

During the construction of the new bridge the towns of Swampscott 
and l^ahant are receiving their supply through a 12-inch main laid 
around the work on a temporary bridge. Slow progress has been 
made in constructing the new bridge. As it is evident that the water 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 123 

pipe cannot be placed in its permanent location until tlie coming sea- 
son, the temporary line is now being covered with a wooden box to 
prevent its freezing. The total amount expended on the work to the 
end of the year was $2,600. 

Connection between Boston and Metropolitan Mains at Milton Lower 

Mills, 
During the month of October a 24-inch branch was set at the junc- 
tion of Morton and Sanford streets, in Dorchester, in the 36-inch 
main which supplies water to Quincy and Milton, and a connection 
made with a 36-inch main of the city of Boston. This connection is 
to be kept closed except in cases of emergency, when it will be used 
to supply either Quincy and Milton or the Dorchester district of the 
city of Boston. The cost of the work was $1,614.88. 

Miscellaneous. 

A check valve has been set at the line between Lynn and Swamp- 
scott in the pipe supplying Swampscott, for the purpose of prevent- 
ing waste of water from the Swampscott standpipe in case of a break 
in the Metropolitan main. 

The work of boxing the pipes on the new pipe bridge over the Bos- 
ton & Maine Railroad at Webster Avenue, in Somerville, has been 
completed at a cost of $845.10, which was paid by the Boston & Maine 
Railroad in connection with the abolition of the grade crossing on 
Webster Avenue. 

The pipe box over the ISTeponset River at Milton Lower Mills has 
been repaired, scraped and painted at a cost of $351.66. 

Thirty-nine leaks and one break have been discovered and repaired 
during the year, at a cost of $1,262.28. A large proportion of the 
leaks have occurred at joints and 12 were from wooden insulating 
joints. The one break which occurred during the year took place 
about four a.m. on February 13 on Adams Street in Milton, in the 24- 
inch main supplying Quincy. One length of pipe was split for 
nearly its full length, the evident cause being settlement of the pipe 
on to the brick masonry of a large sewer, which had been con- 
structed since the pipe was laid. The work of repairing the main 
was expensive and difficult for the reason that the ground was frozen 
to a depth of from 2^/2 to 3% feet, and water escaping from the leak 



124 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

traveled for a considerable distance underground before coming to 
the surface. The line was repaired and placed in service at two p.:m. 
on February 14. Later in the year the main was raised for a length 
of about 70 feet so that there is now a distance of 9 inches between 
the top of the sewer and the bottom of the water pipe. The trench 
was resurfaced with crushed stone and Tarvia. The cost of repairing 
the leak was $406.73, and of raising the pipe and resurfacing the 
street $432.47. 

Meters. 

There were 65 Venturi meters, in sizes varying from 6 to 60 
inches, connected with the distributing mains on December 31, 1912, 
of which 50 were in use in measuring the water supplied to the 
several municipalities in the District, 2 were used on the Weston 
xlqueduct Supply Mains and 1 on the Wakefield supply. There were 
also 3 Hersey disc meters, 1 Hersey torrent, 4 Hersey detector, 1 
Cro\\Ti and 3 Union rotary meters, which were used to measure the 
water supplied in sections where the flow was too small to be con- 
veniently measured with a Venturi meter, li^one of the Venturi 
meter tubes were set in 1912, but the register for the meter on the 
pipe supplying water to Hyde Park was first located in a tank in the 
basement of the pumping station and later moved to the engine room. 
There were 57 recording registers connected with the Venturi meters 
on December 31, 1912, of which 54 were type D and 3 type M. 

The Venturi meters have now been in use for eight or nine years 
and the moving parts of the clocks and other portions of the register- 
ing mechanism are becoming worn, and the cost of maintaining the 
meters will doubtless increase during the next few years. 

Electeolysis. 

Between April 1 and May 7 measurements of the currents of elec- 
tricity flowing on the Metropolitan mains throughout the District 
were made at gaging stations which had been previously' established. 
These measurements showed that the electrical conditions were on 
the whole about the same as during the previous year, but that there 
was a large amount of current flowing on the 48-inch and 42-inch 
low-service mains between ^Maiden and Chelsea, and on the westerly 
48-inch main between the Fitchburg Railroad in Cambridge and 
Spot Pond. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 125 

The 24-incli pipes removed from the tunnel at the Mystic River 
between Charlestown and Chelsea were badly affected by electrolytic 
action. Where they had been immersed in salt water the pittings 
were from % to % of an inch in depth, and there were grooves encir- 
cling the pipes in which the iron had decomposed to a depth of from 
% "to % of an inch. 

On July 29 a leak occurred from the 24-inch pipe line in Broad- 
way, Chelsea, near the power station of the Bay State Street Rail- 
way Company. In the bottom of the pipe from which the leak oc- 
curred there was a hole 3 inches x II/2 inches, and the entire pipe 
was so soft that holes could be easily made at any point. It will 
be necessary to relay a considerable length of this main during the 
coming year. 

Clinton Sewerage. 

Pumping Station, 

The Clinton sewage-disposal works were operated daily throughout 
the year. The average daily quantity of sewage pumped to the filter- 
beds was 1,057,000 gallons, which is 190,000 gallons per day in ex- 
cess of the quantity pumped in 1907, the previous maximum year. 

An investigation and study of the pumping, rainfall and tempera- 
ture records indicate that this increase in the quantity pumped was 
due to the leaky condition of sewers in the town of Clinton. This 
matter has been brought to the attention of the authorities of the town 
but as yet nothing has been done by them. 

The daily average quantities pumped during each month of the 
year were as follows : — 

Gallons. 

January, 1,073,000 

February, 1,017,000 

March, 1,325,000 

April, 1,907,000 

May, 1,490,000 

June, 1,153,000 

July, 835,000 

August, 787,000 

September, 739,000 

October, 761,000 

November, 720,000 

December, 880,000 



126 



IMETROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The following are statistics relating to the operation of the pump- 



ing station : — 



Steam 
Plant from 

Jan. 1 
to Oct. 28. 



Electric 
Plant from 

Oct. 24 
to Dec. 31. 



Total. 



Daily average quantity of sewage pumped (gallons), . 

Daily average quantity of coal consumed (pounds), . 

Daily average quantity of energy used (K. W. H.), . 

Number of days pumping, 

Cost of pumping: — 

Labor 

Fuel and electric energy (energy at $5.30 per thousand K, 
W. H.), 

Repairs and supplies, 

Total for station, 

Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot high, 



1,120,000 
2,095 

297 

$1,815 83 

1,410 18 
244 61 



$3,470 62 
10 43 
0.212 



783,000 

185 
69 

$336 22 

116 60 
65 00 



1,057,000 

2,095 

185 

366 

$2,152 05 

1,526 78 
309 61 



$517 82 
9 59 
0.197 



$3,988 44 
10 31 
0.209 



A 12-inch single stage De Laval centrifugal pump, directly con- 
nected with a 40 H.P. motor of the General Electric squirrel cage 
type, has been installed at the pumping station and has been used 
since October 24 for pumping nearly all of the sewage received at the 
station. Energy for operating this plant is conveyed from the power 
plant at the Wachusett Dam to the sewerage pumping station, a dis- 
tance of 2% miles, by means of a 3-conductor 'No. 6 stranded, rubber- 
insulated, lead-covered cable carried under-ground for a distance of 
about 590 feet from the power station to Boylston Street, and for the 
remainder of the distance to the pumping station by three heavily 
insulated No. 6 copper wires attached to poles of the Worcester Con- 
solidated Street Railway Company, the ^ew England Telephone and 
Telegraph Company and the Clinton Gas Light Company on Boyl- 
ston, Chestnut, Mechanic and High streets. At the power station 
there were installed three 25 K.Y.A. transformers for transform- 
ing the energy from 13,800 volts to 2,300 volts, together with the 
necessary meters, switches and fuses for controlling and measuring 
the energy. At the pumping station there were placed a hand- 
operated starting compensator and a float switch for automatically 
stopping the motor. Eor recording and measuring the quantity of 
sewage pumped a Venturi meter was placed in the force main leading 
to the fllter-beds. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 127 

The cost of the installation was divided approximately as fol- 
lows : — 

Transformer, meters and connections at power station, . . . $1,121 58 

Transmission line, 3,652 52 

Starting compensator, Venturi meter, piping, etc., .... 1,886 19 

Pump and motor, 965 00 



Total, . . -. . $7,625 29 

Filter-heds. 

The sewage was applied to the filter-beds in practically the same 
manner as during the preceding four and one-half years. The beds 
were used in rotation throughout the year. Each of the 25 one-acre 
beds has received about 65,200 gallons of sewage in thirty minutes 
at intervals of two days. During the winter season the surface of 
the beds was plowed in furrows 3% feet apart. The eight settling 
basins into which the sewage is pumped previous to being applied to 
the filter-beds were used in pairs in rotation throughout the year. 
During the winter season the basins were used continuously for a 
month, but from April 1 to December 1 the basins were emptied and 
cleaned after one week's use. The sludge collected in these basins, 
amounting to 732 cubic yards, has all been used on grass land on the 
back slope of the westerly portion of the J^orth Dike. There has been 
a continuous improvement in the effluent from these beds during each 
year since 1909, when distributors and additional underdrains were 
constructed. The results obtained during the past year have been 
better than during any of the past thirteen years that the works have 
been operated. 

The results of the analyses of the sewage and effluent are given in 
the following table : — 



128 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



[Parts per 100,000.] 







Average 

of Four 

Years, 

1906-09. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


Whole 




January 
to June. 


July to 
Decem- 
ber. 


Year, 
1912. 


Albuminoid ammonia, sewage, 


.7540 


.7050 


1.0683 


1.5900 


1.6133 


1.6017 


Albuminoid ammonia, effluent, 


. 


.0768 


.0686 


.0639 


.0981 


.0466 


.0724 


Per cent, removed. 




89.7 


90.3 


94 


94 


97 


95 


Oxygen consumed, sewage, . 




7.045 


6.658 


9.3292 


1J.258 


12.367 


11.812 


Oxygen consumed, effluent, . 




1.0S5 


.8863 


.8713 


.403 


.631 


.517 


Per cent, removed. 




83.5 


86.7 


91 


96 


95 


95.5 


Free ammonia, sewage, . 




4.1617 


3.8867 


5.7417 


3.7067 


5.0500 


4.2129 


Free ammonia, effluent, 




1.3134 


.6493 


.7369 


1.1348 


.2071 


.6710 


Per cent, removed. 




67.5 


83.3 


87 


69 


96 


84 


Nitrogen as nitrates, effluent. 




.1724 


.7338 


.9740 


.4411 


1.2866 


.8638 


Iron, effluent, 




1.9807 


.6395 


.5203 


.6106 


.1452 


.3779 



The cost of maintaining the filter-beds has been as follows : — 

Labor, $3,830 81 

Supplies and expenses, . . 345 79 

Total, . . . . _ $4,176 60 

Cost per million gallons treated, $10 80 



Hydeo-electeic Powee Station. 

The hydro-electric power station at the Wachusett Dam has been 
operated on 261 days during the year, and nearly all of the electric 
energy generated delivered to the Connecticut River Transmission 
Company under a 5-year contract which went into effect on October 
2, 1911. Since October 15, 1912, a small quantity of energy has 
been used in operating a centrifugal pump for lifting the sewage at 
the Clinton sewerage pumping station. The daily output has varied 
from the minimum amount required under the contract to the full 
capacity of the plant. Under all conditions and combinations the 
plant has given excellent service, with onty an occasional minor 
trouble, which has been immediately remedied. 

The force employed includes one electrical engineer, one operator 
and two helpers who give all their time to the plant, and one helper 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



129 



whose time is divided equally between the station, the dam and the 
Superintendent's office. The following are the statistics relating to 
operations at this station : — 



Quantity of energy sold to Connecticut River Transmission 
Company (kilowatt hours), 

Quantity of energy used at power station (kilowatt hours), . 

Quantity of energy used at sewerage pumping station (kilo- 
watt hours), 

Total quantity of energy generated (kilowatt hours). 

Quantity of water used (gallons), 

Average effective head (feet), 

Kilowatt hours generated per million foot gallons, . 
Efficiency of station (per cent.), 



5,716,595 
12,228 

12,765 

5,741,588 

26,393,100,000 
90.8 
2.396 
76.3 



$30,297 95 
35 25 

132 46 



Earnings : — 

Energy supplied Connecticut River Trans- 
mission Company, at $5.30 per thousand 
kilowatt hours, 

Labor supplied Connecticut River Transmis- 
sion Company, 

Energy supplied power and sewerage pump- 
ing stations, credited at $5.30 per thousand 
kilowatt hours 



Cost of operating station : — 
Labor, 

Fuel for heating building 
Repairs and appliances. 
Oil and waste, . 
Small supplies. 
Taxes, 



Net eaming-s, $21,470 00 

Net earnings per thousand kilowatt hours generated, . . . $3.74 





$30,465 m 


$5,531 07 




85 76 




354 46 




87 11 




262 26 




2,675 00 






8,995 66 





Miscellaneous. 
During the year the town of Lexington has constructed a rein- 
forced concrete standpipe 30 feet in diameter and 105 feet high, with 
a capacity of 555,000 gallons. The high-water mark of this standpipe 
is 56 feet higher than that of the two standpipes previously used by 



130 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

the to\vii, and it lias substantially the same elevation as the Metro- 
politan Water Works standpipe in Arlington with which it is con- 
nected. The increased pressure was supplied to the town from the 
standpipe after October 28. 

In April the old material which had been collected at different 
points on the works during the past 14 years was sold to J. E. Harri- 
gan for the sum of $4,110. This material included two 5,000,000- 
gallon and one 8,000,000-gallon Worthington pumping engines ; boil- 
ers, pumps, etc., formerly used by the city of Boston at the Mystic 
Pumping Station; hoisting engines and winches, centrifugal and 
plunger pumps, steam shovel and stone crusher, together with mis- 
cellaneous machinery and piping which had been used during the 
construction of the Wachusett and Sudbury works. 

Engineering. 

In addition to the regular work in connection with the supervision 
of the maintenance and operation of the works the engineering force 
has supervised the work of extending the tunnel at the bridge between 
Chelsea and Charlestown, of lining the Sudbury Aqueduct at Echo 
Bridge, and of relaying pipes at the bridge over the Saugus River. 
Estimates have been made for lowering the pipes crossing Chelsea 
Creek between Chelsea and East Boston, and for relaying pipes 
across Charles River between Cambridge and Brighton, in connection 
with the reconstruction of the Stadium Bridge. Surveys and studies 
have been in progress for the construction of works to care for the 
manufacturing wastes and sewage from the town of Holden. Sur- 
veys and plan of Eramingham Reservoir ]^o. 1 have been completed, 
showing the property of the Commonwealth. The work of surveying 
and establishing property lines and setting stone bounds to mark the 
location of the property of the Board in Cedar Swamp, in West- 
borough, has been in progress. Surveys have been made of the prop- 
erties formerly owned by the Chattanooga Mills, D. A. Burgess and 
D. W. Mitchell on the Sudbury River. Tables have been prepared 
giving the capacity of Lake Cochituate based upon recent surveys. 
An estimate was made of the cost of filtering the water of Lake 
Cochituate, this estimate having been presented to the Legislature in 
connection with the special report upon the subject made by this 
Board and the State Board of Health. 

Appended to this report are tables giving the amount of work done 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 131 

and other information relative to contracts, a series of tables relating 
to the maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, including 
the rainfall, yield of sources of supply, consumption of water in the 
different districts, the number of service pipes, meters and fire hy- 
drants in the Metropolitan Water District, and a summary of statis- 
tics for the year 1912. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DEXTER BRACKETT, 

Chief Engineer. 
Boston, January 1, 1913. 



132 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



EEPOET OF ENGINEEE OF SEWERAGE WOEKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, 

Gentlemen : — The following report of the operations of the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Works for the year ending December 31, 1912, 
is respectfully submitted : — 

Organization. 
The engineering organization until February 21, 1912, was as 
follows : — 

Chief Engineer: 

William M. Brown. 



Division Engineers : 

Frederick D. Smith, 

Frank I. Capen, . 

Henry T. Stiff, 



In charge of maintenance and construction, 

South Metropolitan System. 
In charge of maintenance and construction, 

North Metropolitan System. 
In charge of office and drafting room. 



The resignations on February 21, 1912, of William M. Brown, 
Chief Engineer, to accept an important position elsewhere, and of 
Frank I. Capen, Division Engineer, on April 1, 1912, to enter pri- 
vate business, caused a reorganization of the engineering force. 

On February 28, 1912, Frederick D. Smith was appointed Engi- 
neer in Charge of Sewerage Works. 

The construction of the "New Mystic Sewer through the town of 
Winchester and the city of Medford necessitated the employment of 
additional assistants who have been added as needed until the force at 
the end of the year consisted of the following : — 



Division Engineer : 
Henry T. Stiff, 



Assistant Engineers : 

Clarence A. Moore, 

Arthur F. F. Haskell, 



In charge of office and drafting room and 
of construction of the New Mystic Sewer, 
North Metropolitan System. 

In charge of maintenance studies and rec- 
ords. 

In charge of survey ivork and field work 
in connection with the New Mystic Sewer 
construction. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



133 



In addition to the above, the average number of engineering and 
other assistants employed during the year was 12, which includes 1 
instrumentman, 4 inspectors, 2 draftsmen, 3 rodmen and 2 stenog- 
raphers. 



METROPOLITAE" SEWERAGE DISTRICTS. 

Areas and Populations. 

During the year no changes have been made in the extent of the 
sewerage districts as given in the last annual report. 

The populations of the districts, as given in the following table, 
are based on the census of 1910. 

Table showing Areas and Estimated Populations within the Metropolitan Sewerage 

Districts, as of December 31, 1912. 



City ok Town. 



o . 
o 2 



Arlington, 

Belmont, 

Boston (portions of), 

Cambridge, . 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Lexington, 1 . 

Maiden, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Revere, 

Somerville, . 

Stoneham, . 

Wakefield, . 

Winchester, . 

Winthrop, 

Woburn, 



o 

2.1 

^ 2 

Q 

O 
02 



' Boston (portions of) , 2 

Brookline, 

Dedham,! 

Milton, 

Newton, 

Quincy, 

Waltham, 
.Watertown, . 



Totals, 



Area (Square 
Miles). 



5.20 
4.66 
3.45 
6.11 
2.24 
3.34 
5.11 
5.07 
8.35 
3.73 
5.86 
3.96 
5.50 
7.65 
5.95 
1.61 
12.71 



90.50 



24.96 

6.81 

9.40 

12.59 

16.88 

12.56 

13.63 

4.04 



100.87 



191.37 



Estimated 
Population. 



12,330 

6,200 

106,380 

108,700 

35,260 

36,710 

4,280 
47,370 
25,270 
16,490 
20,350 
81,940 

7,720 
12,030 

9,940 
11,240 
15,930 



558,140 



213,200 
30,010 
9,600 
8,380 
42,230 
35,080 
29,460 
13,880 



381,840 



939,980 



1 Part of town. 



2 Including Hyde Park. 



METROPOLITAISr SEWERS. 
Sewers Purchased and Constructed and their Connections. 
During the year there has been built 0.09 of a mile of Metropolitan 
sewer within the sewerage districts, so that there are now 103.426 
miles of Metropolitan sewers. Of this total, 9.642 miles of sewers, 
with the Quincy pumping station, have been purchased from cities 



134 



INIETROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



and towns of the districts, the remaining 93.784 miles of Metropoli- 
tan sewers and other works having been constructed by the Metro- 
politan boards. 

The locations, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in Ap- 
pendix ^0. 5, Table 'No. 1, together with other data referring to the 
public and special connections with the system. 

Information relating to areas, populations, local sewer connections 
and other data for the whole Metropolitan Sewerage District appears 
in the following table : — 



North Metropolitan District. 



Area 
(Square 
Miles). 



90.50 



Estimated 

Total 
Population. 



558,140 



Miles of 
Local Sewer 
connected. 



700.25 



Estimated 

Population 

contributing 

Sewage. 



496,795 



Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 
Population 
(Per Cent.), 



89.0 



Connections made 
WITH Metro- 
politan Sewers. 



Public. 



271 



Special. 



477 



South Metropolitan District. 


100.87 


381,840 


572.40 


252,265 


66.1 


130 


33 


Entire Metropolitan District. 


191.37 


939,980 


1,272.65 


749,060 


79.7 


401 


510 



Of the estimated gross population of 939,980 on December 31, 
1912, 749,060, representing 79.7 per cent, were on that date con- 
tributing sewage to the Metropolitan sewers, through a total length 
of 1,272.65 miles of local sewers owned by the individual cities and 
towns of the district. 

These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan System by 401 
public and 510 special connections. During the current year there 
has been an increase of 32.08 miles of local sewers connected with the 
Metropolitan System, and 7 public and 14 special connections have 
been added. 

Pumping Stations and Pumpage. 

The following table shows the average daily volume of sewage 
lifted at each of the six principal Metropolitan pumping stations and 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



135 



the Quincy sewage lifting station during the year, as compared with 
the corresponding volumes for the previous year. 





Average Daily Pumpage. 


PUMPING STATION. 


Jan. 1, 1911, to 
Dec. 31, 1911. 


Jan. 1, 1912, to 
Dec. 31, 1912. 


Increase dxiring the 
Year. 


Deer Island, 


Gallons. 
52,800,000 


Gallons. 
55,700,000 


Gallons. 
2,900,000 


Per Cent. 
5.5 


East Boston, 


50,800,000 


53,700,000 


2,900,000 


5.7 


Charlestown, 


32,600,000 


34,600,000 


2,000,000 


6.1 


Alewife Brook, 


3,012,000 


3,446,000 


434,000 


14.4 


Quincy, 


4,069,000 


3,958,000 


111,0001 


2.71 


Ward Street (actual gallons pumped), 


22,600,000 


26,258,000 


3,658,000 


16.2 


Quincy sewage lifting station. 


- 


48,000 


- 


- 



1 Decrease. 



CONSTRUCTIOIsL 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM. 

Chapter 461 of the Acts of 1912 provided for the construction of 
an additional Metropolitan sewer from a point in West Medford 
through the town of Winchester to the Woburn line, which has been 
designated the I^ew Mystic Sewer. 

The Act also provided for new screening facilities at the East Bos- 
ton pumping station. 

"Nbw Mystic Sewer. 
Surveys and borings have been made and studies completed to de- 
termine' the route of this sewer. A line through the central part of 
the town of Winchester was first studied in a preliminary way. In 
this line serious physical difficulties were encountered. Moreover, 
as the town of Winchester had purchased for park purposes the 
Whitney property and pond with the expectation of lowering the 
surface of the pond about ^ve feet, it was found that it would be 
necessary to introduce three siphons if this line were followed, con- 
sequently the route has been laid east of the Aberjona River, 
largely through lands of the Boston & Maine Railroad, the Metro- 
politan Park Commission, the Winchester Park Commission and in 
public streets. By this route siphons are avoided and a good natural 
foundation for the sewer provided for most of its length. 



136 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Section 67. — !N'oeth Metropolitan System. 

This section starts from a point on the easterly side of the Boston 
& Maine Railroad at Station 56 + 80, Section 22 of the Metropoli- 
tan sewer constructed in 1893, at a distance of about 353 feet below 
the bellmouth at the intersection with the old Mystic Sewer, and ex- 
tends through land of the Boston & Maine Railroad, including the old 
Mystic Sewer filtration beds, to and through land of C. F. and Robert 
Bacon, then through other land of said Railroad and through land 
of Robert Bacon and across Mystic Place to private land of Jacob 
W. Wilbur and through other land of Robert Bacon and along 
Grove Place. 

This sewer is built partly in tunnel. Some particulars of the 
section are as follows : — 

Total length of section, 4,800 feet. 

Leng-th of tunnel, 1,425 feet. 

Average depth of cut in open trench, 21 feet. 

Greatest depth in tunnel, 53 feet. 

Diameter of concrete sewer (circular), 54 inches. 

Name of contractor, Coleman Brothers. 

Date of contract, October 15, 1912. 

Division Engineer in charge of construction, Henry T. Stiff. 

Assistant Engineer, A. F. F. Haskell. 

At the present time work is in progress at two points in open 
trench and at five headings in tunnel. At the end of the year ap- 
proximately twenty per cent, of the work was completed. The 
excavations in open cut are made with the assistance of a trench 
machine and a platform derrick which is used at the rock cut open- 
ing. Ground water was found at elevation 113 at Station 18 + 50 
and is pumped by a 6-inch centrifugal pump. 'No excessive amount 
of ground water has been encountered. iSTo ground water was found 
in the tunnel portion below Station 15. The earth material excavated 
so far has consisted of sand and gravel and some clay near the bot- 
tom. Excellent material for concrete has been found in abundance 
in the trench. This section will probably be completed about June 
1, 1913. 

Plans are in preparation for the remaining sections of this exten- 
sion and contracts will be made for the same early in the coming year. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 137 

Screening Machinery at East Boston Pumping Station. 

The work of renewing and enlarging the screening plant at the 
East Boston pumping station, authorized by chapter 461 of the 
Acts of the year 1912, was commenced on July 23, 1912. On July 
19, a taking of 1,725 square feet was made in Addison Street lying 
immediately east of the Boston & Albany Freight Railroad and 
south of the pumping station building. The screening at this station 
has been carried on in a small underground chamber which was 
built at the time of the construction of the original plant. The 
changes contemplate the abolition of this underground chamber and 
the screens will be operated from the ground level in a new building. 
The machinery will also be replaced in duplicate. 

At the present time the concrete and brick masonry by-pass has 
been constructed, together with a new screen-chamber and the cast- 
iron screen guides are in place. 

Suitable connection has been provided for an additional siphon 
across Chelsea Creek as was contemplated in the original plans. 

A connection has been made between the sewer of the city of Bos- 
ton in Addison Street and the suction sewer at the station. This 
connecting sewer has been furnished with a fixed screen to be used 
during the period of construction of the new work. When this work 
is completed the sewer will be relocated with a connection in such 
manner as to enter before the screens. The line of 6-inch water pipe 
which supplies the station has been changed to meet the new require- 
ments. 

Addition to the Screen-House Building. 

Plans have been prepared and contract made for the erection of 
the addition to the screen-house building. Following are the partic- 
ulars of the contract : 

Date of contract, December 26, 1912. 

Name of contractor, J. E. Locatelli Company, Inc. 

Price for reconstruction of screen-house building complete, $4,700. 

At this date the contractor has brought some material but has 
done no construction work. 

Plans have been made for the new screening machinery and a con- 
tract for the machinery will be made early in the coming year. 



138 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Siphon at Saeatoga Steeet, East Bostoij^t. 

In extending its drainage works the citv of Boston found it neces- 
sary to cross with a siphon under the line of the Metropolitan sewer 
in Saratoga Street at a point near Station 2 + 60 of Section 9 of 
the North Metropolitan Sewer. 

Because of the danger to the 9-foot Metropolitan main sewer dur- 
ing construction the city desired that this siphon should be con- 
structed by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. Suitable 
arrangements were made whereby the city agreed to reimburse the 
Board for all expenses incurred, and work was begun on the siphon 
on September 4, 1912, under the supervision of Charles A. Haskin, 
using compressed air process. This siphon is built of brick and 
has a width of 5 feet and a height of 6 feet, and was successfully 
completed on October 30, 1912. Reimbursement from the city of 
Boston for all expenses was received by the Board. 

maintena:n^ce. 

Scope of Work ai^d Force employed. 

The maintenance of the Metropolitan Sewerage System includes 
the operation of 7 pumping stations, the ^N'ut Island screen-house 
and 103.426 miles of Metropolitan sewers, receiving the discharge 
from 1,272.65 miles of city and town sewers at 401 points, together 
with the care and study of inverted siphons under streams and in the 
harbor. 

The permanent maintenance force includes 170 men, of whom 103 
are employed on the North System and 67 on the South System. 
These are subdivided as follows: North Metropolitan System, en- 
gineers and other employes at the pumping stations, 63, and on main- 
tenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds, 40 men ; South 
Metropolitan System, 34 engineers and other employes within the 
pumping stations, and 33 men on maintenance, care of sewer lines, 
buildings and grounds. 

In Appendix No. 5 will be found tables numbered 2 and 3 which 
contain data concerning the use of the system and its relation to the 
contributing cities and towns. 

The regular work of this department, in addition to the operation 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 139 

of the pumping stations, lias consisted of routine work of cleaning 
and inspecting sewers and siphons, care of pumping stations and 
other buildings and grounds, and the maintenance of the ferry at 
Shirley Gut for transporting employes and supplies in connection 
with the operation of the Deer Island pumping station. 

In addition to these regular duties other work has been done by 
this department as below described. 

Geabe Ceossing at Medfoed Steeet, Someeville, Eitchbueg 
Division of the Boston & Maine Eaileoad. 

At Medford Street, Somerville, the street has been depressed and 
the railroad carried across it on a bridge. The construction of the 
bridge abutments necessitated the driving of pile foundations and 
close attention had to be given to insure the safety of the Metropoli- 
tan sewer at this point. The inspection of this work in connection 
with the interests of the Metropolitan sewer has been done by a fore- 
man and assistants of the maintenance department. No damage was 
done to the Metropolitan sewer. 

During this construction it was necessary to make a temporary 
connection, without regulator, betw^een the 4-foot local combined 
sewer in Medford Street and the Metropolitan sewer. This connec- 
tion will be discontinued early in the coming year and the local 
sewage returned to its former channel. 

Geade Ceossing at Oeient Heights, Boston, Reveee Beach & 

Lynn Raieeoad. 

At Saratoga Street, Orient Heights, the work of abolishing the 
grade crossing is in progress, the railroad being depressed 3 feet and 
the street raised 17 feet. It was found necessary to reinforce the 
9-foot Metropolitan sewer at this point by constructing a relieving 
arch of steel reinforced concrete 12 inches thick at the crown over the 
sewer to support the railroad tracks and the street embankment of 
the approaches to the bridge. For a part of the distance it was 
necessary to carry this reinforcement on a pile foundation. The 
inspection of this work in connection with the interests of the Metro- 
politan sewer has been done by a foreman and assistants of the 
maintenance department. 

At the end of the year 354 linear feet of arch reinforcement 
were completed, extending from Station 29 + 46 to Station 33, Sec- 
tion 8 of the North Metropolitan sewer, and the work of reinforce- 



140 



METROPOLITAN ^YATER [Pub. Doc. J 



ment will be continued when work opens in the spring. Xo damage 
has been done to the Metropolitan sewer. 

BOILEKS AND ECONOMIZEE AT ClIAELESTOWIs^ StATIOjS". 

The Green economizer at the Charlestown station, which was in- 
stalled at the time of the construction of the plant, had become so 
. weakened by rust and deteriorated bj formation of scale that it no 
longer gave trustworthy or economical service. Bids were invited 
from manufacturers and a Sturtevant economizer was purchased at a 
cost of $924.75, which included removing the old economizer and 
placing the new one in position, but did not include masonry changes. 
The maintenance department completed the masonry changes and 
made the necessary connections with the existing plant. 

The horizontal tubular boilers at this station have been in use many 
years. Two were placed when the plant was installed in 1894 and 
two were added about five years later. The foundations of all of 
these had settled somewhat and the settings were rebuilt during the 
year. In connection with this the boiler inspector made a thorough 
examination of the boilers, subjecting them to a hydraulic pressure 
of 170 pounds and applying a hammer-test, so called. They were 
found to be in good condition. 

!N'ew piping for feed and blow-off has been put in and the boiler 
plant generally put in first class condition. A new concrete floor 
will be placed in the boiler room early in the coming year. 

Dredging at East Boston Pumping Station Wharf. 

To facilitate the handling of cargoes of coal, it became necessary to 
dredge a berth alongside the wharf at the East Boston pumping 
station. A contract for this was entered into with the Bay State 
Dredging Company on April 6, 1912. The price for the complete 
dredging and removing of material was $375. This work was com- 
pleted in May, 1912. 

Painting. 

During the year all the woodwork in buildings and on fences at 
the ^ut Island station, dwelling house at Island Avenue, Quincy, 
Hough's !N'eck stock yard and at the Quincy pumping station was 
painted, and the brick buildings, together with the East Boston pump- 
ing station, received a coat of linseed oil outside. The concrete 
locker building at East Boston received two coats of " Cemcoat " 
paint. This work was done by the regular employes of the Board. ' 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



141 



Draia^age from Tais^nerieSj Gelatine and Glue Works in Win- 
chester, WOBURN AND StONEHAM. 

Five men and a foreman have been employed during a part of the 
year in flushing and cleaning the Metropolitan sewer through the 
tannery districts of Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham. 

All the tanneries and glue works of the district now have settling 
tanks of substantial size. This method of treatment has very greatly 
reduced the amount of sludge material entering the Metropolitan 
sewers and has materially lessened the cost of maintenance of the 
sewers in this district. 

The following table gives details of settling tanks introduced to 
date, showing the operations of same with the amount of sludge col- 
lected and removed. 



Table of Semi-fluid Sludge removed from Settling Basins at the Tanneries, Gelatine 
and Glue Works in Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham. 











T3 


.i-o 


-O bP O 












B^ 


■3-n^ 










§S2 


« o 










Inside 








Location of Basin. 


Basin put in 
Operation. 


Measure- 
ment 
of Basin 


1^ 




fl p u 








(Feet). 


U bO 

II 


Average ( 
fluid S 
(Cubic ^ 


Total Qua 
Sludge 1 
the Ve£ 
Yards). 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 1, 


Jan. 


15, 1910 


47.0 X 23.0 


7 


131 


918 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 2, 


May 


9, 1910 


47.0 X 23.0 


11 


116 


1,275 


Beggs &, Cobb Company, Basin No. 3, 


Oct. 


19, 1911 


51.0 X 25.0 


9 


64.4 


579 


American Hide and Leather Company, 


Aug. 


1, 1910 


48.3 X 23.0 


1 


70 


70 


Factory E. 














American Hide and Leather Company, 


Nov. 


15, 1910 


48.0 X 23.1 


51 


133.5 


734 


Factory D. 














Cottle Leather Company, . 




July 


15, 1910 


49.0 X 23.2 


None 


- 


- 


B. F. Kimball & Co., 




Dec. 


10, 1910 


47.2 X 23.0 


4^ 


140.5 


632 


E. Cummings Leather Company, 




Nov. 


1, 1910 


45.9 X 22.6 


7 


102 


716 


W. P. Fox & Sons, 




July 


12, 1910 


47.8 X 22.6 


7 


134 


938 


T. F. Boyle & Co., . 




Sept. 


15, 1910 


48.1 X 23.1 


3 


105 


315 


Champion Tanning Company, . 




Jan. 


9, 1911 


4G.8 X 22.9 


4§ 


82 


370 


Stoneham Tanning Company, . 




May 


1, 1911 


43.8 X 19.5 


3i 


142.5 


499 


American Glue Company, 




Oct. 


1, 1910 


47.1 X 23.0 


3i 


136.3 


477 


Winchester Manufacturing Company, 


■ 


[902 / 


35.5 X 24.7 
67.2 X 12.0 


} ' 


57.3 


401 


Total, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


7,924 



142 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

PUMPING STATIONS. 
Capacity an^d Results. 

Chapter 494, Acts of 1911, the eight-hour law, so called, be- 
came operative on July 1, 1911. At this date extra labor was em- 
ployed at all of the pumping stations. 

The cost of operation of the stations for the year ending December 
31, 1911, was increased by the cost of this extra labor for one-half 
of the year. The cost for the year ending December 31, 1912, is 
increased over the previous year by the fact that this extra labor 
has been employed the whole year. The vacation period has also 
been increased from ten to fifteen days per year. 

The following tables summarize the pumping records for the year 
for the Metropolitan sewerage stations : — 

!N'oRTH Metropoijtan System. 

Deer Island Pumping Station, 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps with im- 
pellers or wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump : 100,000,000 gallons, with 19-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 50,600,000 foot-pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 55,700,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screen- 
men, 1 relief screenman and 1 laborer. 
Coal used : New River, costing from $3.92 to $3.94 per gross ton. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



143 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Deer Island Pump- 
ing Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(GaUons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lba. 

per 100 lbs. j 

Coal). 


1912 

January, . 




2,116,300,000 


68,300,000 


58,500,000 


100,300,000 


11.45 


58,200,000 


February, 






1,876,400,000 


64,700,000 


53,700,000 


119,400,000 


11.54 


53,800,000 


March, 






2,047,500,000 


66,000,000 


49,900,000 


108,300,000 


11.06 


53,800,000 


April, 






2,126,600,000 


70,900,000 


56,700,000 


100,000,000 


11.04 


52,100,000 


May, 






1,959,300,000 


63,200,000 


50,100,000 


78,400,000 


10.90 


53,300,000 


June, 






1,510,200,000 


50,400,000 


37,000,000 


64,800,000 


10.72 


56,500,000 


July, 






1,643,800,000 


53,000,000 


39,000,000 


82,800,000 


10.54 


50,300,000 


August, . 






1,468,700,000 


47,400,000 


38,100,000 


68,800,000 


10.48 


44,900,000 


September, 






1,336,200,000 


44,500,000 


34,200,000 


65,100,000 


10.81 


45,800,000 


October, . 






1,326,700,000 


42,800,000 


33,800,000 


61,900,000 


10.09 


42,400,000 


November, 






1,387,600,000 


46,300,000 


39,000,000 


71,900,000 


10.53 


46,400,000 


December, 






1,565,700,000 


50,500,000 


36,200,000 


98,400,000 


10.43 


49,700,000 


Total, 


20,365,000,000 


- 


- 


- 


~."^ 


- 


Average, 






- 


55,700,000 


43,900,000 


85,000,000 


10.80 


60,600,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Deer Island 

Station. 

Volume (20,365 Million Gallons) X Lift (10.80 Feet) = 219,942 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal 

Oil 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, ...... 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals. 

Totals 

Labor at screens, .... 



$13,487 60 

9.545 04 

371 20 

109 40 

1,686 00 

117 55 

1,377 75 



$26,694 54 



$0.06132 
.04340 
.00169 
.00050 
.00767 
.00053 
.00626 



$0.12137 
.01304 



144 



jnietropolitax water 



[Pub. Doc. 



East Boston Pwm'ping Station, 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
pellers or wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 piunp : 100,000,000 gallons with 19-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot hft. 

Average duty for the year: 73,200,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 53,700,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 2 relief engineers, 4 firemen, 1 relief fireman, 

3 oilers, 3 screenmen, 1 relief screenman, 3 helpers and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: New River, costing from $3,755 to $4 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the East Boston Pump- 
ing Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(GaUons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1912 
January, . 




2,054,300,000 


66,300,000 


56,500,000 


98,300,000 


16.15 


75,000,000 


Febniary, 






1,818,400,000 


62,700,000 


51,700,000 


117,400,000 


15.80 


63,200,000 


March, 






1,985,500,000 


64,000,000 


47,900,000 


106,300,000 


15.83 


64,000,000 


April, 






2,066,600,000 


68,900,000 


54,700,000 


98,000,000 


15.83 


83,100,000 


May, 






1,897,300,000 


61,200,000 


48,100,000 


76,400,000 


15.66 


80,800,000 


Jiine, 






1,450,200,000 


48,400,000 


35,000,000 


62,800,000 


15.34 


78,800,000 


July. 






1,581,800,000 


51,000,000 


37,000,000 


80,400,000 


14.76 


73,800,000 


Augiist, . 






1,406,700,000 


45,400,000 


36,100,000 


66,800,000 


15.23 


81,200,000 


September, 






1,276,200,000 


42,500,000 


32,200,000 


63,100,000 


15.83 


79,700,000 


October, . 






1,264,700,000 


40,800,000 


31,800,000 


59,900,000 


15.47 


76,800,000 


November, 






1,327,700,000 


44,300,000 


37,000,000 


69,900,000 


15.39 


65,100,000 


December, 






1,503,700,000 


48,500,000 


34,200,000 


96,400,000 


15.13 


56,900,000 


Total, 


19,633,100,000 




- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


53,700,000 


41,900,000 


83,000,000 


15.54 


73,200,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



145 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the East Boston 

Station. 

Volume (19,633.1 Million Gallons) X Lift (15.54 Feet) = 305,098.4 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste 

Water 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals. 

Totals 

Labor at screens 



$19,270 77 

9,952 86 

399 90 

138 65 

1,695 60 

113 71 

1,828 88 



S33,400 37 



SO. 06316 
.03262 
.00131 
.00046 
.00556 
.00037 
.00599 



$0.10947 
.00943 



CJiarlestown Pumping Station, 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of 
them having impellers or wheels, 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 8.25 
feet in diameter. They are driven by triple-expansion engines of 
the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump : 60,000,000 gallons with 8-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot Hft. 

Average duty for the year: 50,900,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 34,600,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screen- 
men and 1 relief screenman. 

Coal used : New River and Pocahontas, costing from $3,725 to $3,985 per gross 
ton. 



146 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Charlestown Pump- 
ing Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(GaUons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(GaUons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1912 
January, . 




1,141,200,000 


36,800,000 


29,000,000 


58,800,000 


8.52 


53,500,000 


February, 




. 


1,097,500,000 


37,800,000 


30,300,000 


63,500,000 


8.48 


50,400,000 


March, 






1,177,300,000 


38,000,000 


26,600,000 


59,000,000 


8.47 


50,700,000 


April, 






1,200,600,000 


40,000,000 


32,400,000 


50,800,000 


8.66 


58,000,000 


May, 






1,193,600,000 


38,500,000 


31,100,000 


52,500,000 


8.56 


57,500,000 


June, 






996,600,000 


33,200,000 


27,400,000 


37,400,000 


8.24 


49,300,000 


July, 






1,130,300,000 


36,500,000 


28,500,000 


50,600,000 


8.17 


52,200,000 


August, . 






973,700,000 


31,400,000 


27,400,000 


38,500,000 


8.03 


49,700,000 


September, 






901,600,000 


30,100,000 


24,500,000 


43,400,000 


8.12 


60,200,000 


October, . 






940,700,000 


30,300,000 


24,500,000 


43,100,000 


8.08 


46,300,000 


November, 






886,600,000 


29,600,000 


24.000,000 


46,100,000 


8.09 


46,000,000 


December, 






1,031,300,000 


33,300,000 


25,000,000 


59,300,000 


8.27 


46,700,000 i 


Total, 


12,671,000,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


34,600,000 


27,600,000 


50,300,000 


8.31 


50,900,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Charlestown 

Station. 

Volume (12,671 Million Gallons) X Lift (8.31 Feet) = 105,296 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor 

Coal, . . . ... 

Oil, 

Waste 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals. 

Totals 

Labor at screens, .... 



812,743 77 
3,908 20 
225 02 
108 15 
555 60 
41 68 
700 51 



518,282 93 



$0.12103 
.03712 
.00214 
.00103 
.00528 
.00039 
.00665 



$0.17364 
.02781 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



147 



Alewife Brook Pumping Station, 
The plant at this station consists of the original installation of 
small commercial pumps and engines, i.e., two 9-inch Andrews verti- 
cal centrifugal pumps, with direct-connected compound marine en- 
gines, together with the recent additions. The latter consists of a 
specially designed engine of the vertical cross-compound type, having 
between the cylinders a centrifugal pump rotating on a horizontal 
axis. 

Contract capacity of the two original pumps : 4,500,000 gallons each, with 13- 
foot lift. 

Contract capacity of new pump : 13,000,000 gallons, with 13-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 17,400,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day : 3,446,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief 
sereenman. 

Coal used : New River, costing from $4,375 to $4.59 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at 
Pumping Station of the North Metropolitan 



the Alewife Brook 
System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(GaUons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1912 

January, . 




137,237,000 


4,427,000 


3,862,000 


6,695,000 


12.62 


19,000,000 


February, 






124,575,000 


4,296,000 


3,478,000 


7,462,000 


12.49 


19,000,000 


March, 






154,161,000 


4,973,000 


3,669,000 


6,872,000 


12.54 


21,900,000 


April, 






173,197,000 


5,773,000 


4,677,000 


7,344,000 


12.47 


24,400,000 


May, 






131,866,000 


4,254,000 


3,574,000 


5,300,000 


12.44 


19,200,000 


June, 






92,620,000 


3,087,000 


2,414,000 


3,910,000 


12.82 


17,900,000 


July, 






88,130,000 


2,843,000 


2,288,000 


4,318,000 


12.67 


16,700,000 


August, . 






75,378,000 


2,432,000 


2,076,000 


3,478,000 


12.85 


14,900,000 


September, 






64,106,000 


2,137,000 


1,868,000 


3,380,000 


12.87 


13,700,000 


October, . 






60,655,000 


1,957,000 


1,658,000 


2,645,000 


12.86 


13,200,000 


November, 






69,280,000 


2,309,000 


1,826,000 


3,526,000 


12.84 


13,700,000 


December, 






88,786,000 


2,864,000 


2,120,000 


5,429,000 


12.87 


16,300,000 


Total, 


1,259,991,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


3,446,000 


2,793,000 


5,028,000 


12.70 


17,400,000 



148 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Average Cost per Million Fool-gallons for Pumping at the Alewife Brook 

Station. 

Volume (1,259.991 Million Gallons) X Lift (12.70 Feet) = 16,001.9 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil, . 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services 



$6,385 78 

1,611 65 

138 35 

77 93 

211 32 

4 30 

296 52 



$8,725 85 



$0.39906 
.10071 
.00865 
.00487 
.01321 
.00027 
.01853 



$0.54530 
.11702 



South Metkopolitan System. 

Ward Street Pumping Station. 
At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping engines, 
of the Allis-Chalmers type, operating reciprocating pumps, the 
plungers of which are 48 inches in diameter with a 60-inch stroke. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 50,000,000 gallons each, with 4o-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 81,075,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 26,258,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 4 oilers, 4 assistant 

engineers, 1 machinist and 1 laborer. 
Coal used : New River, costing from $3.91 to $4.35 per gross ton. 
Material intercepted at screens during the year, 1,206 cubic yards. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



149 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Ward Street Pump- 
ing Station of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


• 
Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 
Lift 

(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1912. 
January, . . . . 


910,129,000 


29,359,000 


26,029,000 


36,379,000 


41.17 


87,800,000 


February, 




845,440,000 


29,134,000 


22,600,000 


54,315,000 


40.78 


85,000,000 


March, 




1,026,523,000 


33,099,000 


23,250,000 


47,787,000 


41.50 


91,700,000 


April, 




1,095,814,000 


36,527,000 


30,600,000 


45,000,000 


42.56 


92,500,000 


May, 




934,875,000 


30,158,000 


18,250,000 


36,500,000 


40.96 


86,000,000 


June, 




732,244,000 


24,408,000 


19,100,000 


29,100,000 


40.27 


83,800,000 


July, 




736,999,000 


23,771,000 


17,800,000 


44,700,000 


40.17 


85,500,000 


August, . 




692,126,000 


23,327,000 


19,670,000 


26,350,000 


39.35 


79,500,000 


September, 




606,389,000 


20,213,000 


15,550,000 


27,450,000 


39.18 


70,800,000 


October, . 




662,216,000 


21,362,000 


17,669,000 


27,255,000 


39.30 


72,200,000 


November, 




642,953,000 


21,432,000 


17,600,000 


30,390,000 


39.40 


72,200,000 


December, 




691,471,000 


22,305,000 


17,000,000 


35,400,000 


39.50 


65,900,000 


Total, 


9,577,179,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, . 




- 


26,258,000 


20,427,000 


36,719,000 


40.35 


81,075,000 



Records from plunger displacement. 

Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Ward Street 

Station. 

Volume (9,577.1 Million Gallons) X Lift (40.35 Feet) = 386,436 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 


Labor, 


$16,166 12 


$0.04183 


Coal, 
















8,426 68 


.02180 


Oil, . . . • . 
















232 24 


.00060 


Waste, 
















31 70 


.00008 


Water, 
















1,534 80 


.00397 


Packing, 
















181 31 


.00047 


Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 
















2,201 22 


.00570 


Totals 


$28,774 07 


$0.07445 


Labor at screens, .... 
















- 


.01164 



Quincy Pumping Station. 

At this station are two compound condensing Deane pumping 
engines and one Lawrence centrifugal pump driven bj a Sturtevant 
compound condensing engine. 



150 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contract capacity of 3 pumps: Deane, 3,000,000 gallons; Deane, 5,000,000 

gallons; Lawrence centrifugal, 10,000,000 gallons. 
Average duty for the year: 31,375,000 foot-pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 3,958,000 gallons. 
Force employed: 3 engineei's, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief 

screenman. 
Coal used: New River, costing from $4,505 to $4.69 per gross ton. 
Materials intercepted at screen during the year, 194 cubic yards. 

Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Quincy Pumping 
Station of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1912 

January, . 




165,185,000 


5,329,000 


4,510,000 


9,170,000 


22.01 


35,500,000 


February, 






136,989,000 


4,724,000 


3,745,000 


8,014,000 


21.75 


32,300,000 


March, 






165,202,000 


5,329,000 


3,931,000 


7,175,000 


23.19 


34,800,000 


April, 






178,243,000 


5,941,000 


5,071,000 


7,095,000 


25.50 


36,400,000 


May, 






155,999,000 


5,032,000 


4,355,000 


5,628,000 


22.16 


34,700,000 


June, 






116,485,000 


3,883,000 


3,154,000 


4,503,000 


21.17 


32,500,000 


July, 






102,932,000 


3,320,000 


2,950,000 


3,706,000 


21.02 


31,400,000 


August, . 






90,565,000 


2,921,000 


2,551,000 


3,200,000 


21.03 


30,000,000 


September, 






80,980,000 


2,699,000 


2,389,000 


2,947,000 


21.07 


28,000,000 


October, . 






79,070,000 


2,551,000 


2,227,000 


2,817,000 


21.01 


26,300,000 


November, 






81,544,000 


2,718,000 


2,460,000 


3,098,000 


21.01 


27,200,000 


December, 






94,397,000 


3,046,000 


2,586,000 


5,113,000 


21.07 


27,400,000 


Total, 


1,447,591,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


3,958,000 


3,327,000 


5,206,000 


21.83 


31,375,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Quincy Station. 

Volume (1,447.6 Million Gallons) X Lift (21.83 Feet) = 31,601.1 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals. 

Totals 

Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services, 



S6,331 95 

1,678 39 

38 90 

18 20 

227 69 

33 16 

441 03 



S8,769 32 



SO. 20037 
.05311 
.00123 
.00057 
.00720 
.00105 
.01395 



$0.27748 
.05063 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 151 

Nut Island Screen-House, 

The plant at this house includes two sets of screens in duplicate, 
actuated bj small reversing engines of the Eitchburg type. Two 
vertical Deane boilers, 80 horse-power each, operate the engines, pro- 
vide heat and light for the house, burn materials intercepted at the 
screens, and furnish power for the Quincj sewage lifting station. 

Average daily quantity of sewage passing screens, 48,200,000 gallons. 
Total materials intercepted at screens, 1,145.5 cubic yards. 
Materials intercepted per million gallons of sewage discharged, 1.75 cubic feet. 
Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief 

screenman. 
Coal used : New River, costing from $4.04 to $4.12 per gross ton. 

Quincy Sewage Lifting Station, 

At this station are two 6-inch submerged Lawrence centrifugal 
pumps with vertical shafts actuated by two Sturtevant direct-current 
motors. 

The labor and electric energy for this station are supplied from 
the Nut Island screen-house and as used at present it does not mate- 
rially increase the amount of coal used at the latter station. The 
effluent is largely ground water. 

Average daily amount pumped, 48,000 gallons. 
Average lift, 15.8 feet. 

Coal for use at the several stations has been purchased as fol- 
lows : — 



152 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 







Gross Tons, 


Bituminous Coal. 








c 
■ft 

S 

d 
P^ 

c . 
S a 
^ o 

Q 


a 
'ft 
S 

C 

°« 
en a 

o o 

^5 
^& 
W 


M 

a 
'ft 
S 

3 
Ph 
C 

Id 

M O 

-SI 


1 
ft 

S 

Pk 

2-1 


bO 

.9 
'ft 

a 

3 

>-' d 
cSOC 


bO 

a 
'ft 

a 

3 
Ph 
>> . 
S 

fl o 


1 

3 
<D 

73 

3 

a 

3 

12; 


3 

o 

ft 

0) 
'u 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


. 696.496 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


S3 92 


Staples Coal Company, 


. 420.000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 93 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


. 221.310 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 94 


Staples Coal Company, 


. 929.550 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 94 


New England Coal and Coke Com 


i- 


312.460 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 755 


pany. 
New England Coal and Coke Com 


L- 


716.905 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 78 


pany. 
New England Coal and Coke Com 


- 


147,362 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 815 


pany. 
Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


216.000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 84 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


117.244 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 91 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


244.750 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 94 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


588.100 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 985 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


. 


338.829 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 00 


New England Coal and Coke Com 


- 


- 


37.231 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 725 


pany. 
New England Coal and Coke Com 


- 


- 


242.471 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 75 


pany. 
New England Coal and Coke Com 


- 


- 


284.100 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 765 


pany. 
Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


291.630 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 92 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


461.000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 985 


New England Coal and Coke Com 


- 


- 


- 


115.137 


- 


- 


- 


4 375 


pany. 
New England Coal and Coke Com 


- 


- 


- 


92.848 


- 


- 


- 


4 40 


pany. 
Locke Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


29.060 


- 


- 


- 


4 54 


Locke Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


89.150 


- 


- 


- 


4 59 


Staples Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


424.965 


- 


- 


3 91 


Staples Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


223.521 


- 


- 


3 97 


Staples Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


456.092 


- 


- 


4 005 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


891.153 


- 


- 


4 315 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


102.070 


- 


- 


4 35 


City Fuel Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


164.495 


- 


4 505 


Neponset Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


108.389 


- 


4 53 


City Fuel Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


61.600 


- 


4 65 


City Fuel Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


53.910 


- 


4 69 


Staples Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


100 


4 04 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


400 


4 12 


Total gross tons. 


2,267.356 ^ 


2,681.650 ] 


,316.432 


326.195 5 


!,097.801 


388.394 


500 


- 


Average price per gross ton, . 


S3 93 


S3 876 


S3 87 


$4 455 


$4 13 


S4 56 


$4 10 


- 



1 Include adjustments for quality. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 153 

Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls. 

The Deer Island outfall has been in continuous operation since 
Mav, 1895. 

The 60-inch outfall pipes on the South Metropolitan System have 
been in operation since October^ 1904. 

These outfalls are in good condition and free from deposit. Dur- 
ing the year the average flow through the E'orth Metropolitan outfall 
at Deer Island has been 55,700,000 gallons of sewage per 24 hours, 
with a maximum rate of 151,800,000 gallons on December 27. 
The average discharge from the outfalls of the South Metropolitan 
System during the year has been 48,200,000 gallons of sewage per 
24 hours, with a maximum rate of 135,000,000 gallons per 24 hours 
on February 21. 

Material Intercepted at the Screens. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the !N^orth Metropolitan 
Sewerage stations, consisting of rags, paper and other floating mate- 
rials, has during the year amounted to 4,069 cubic yards. This is 
equivalent to 5.4 cubic feet for each million gallons of sewage pumped 
at Deer Island. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the South Metropolitan 
Sewerage stations has amounted to 2,545.5 cubic yards, equal to 3.89 
cubic feet per million gallons of sewage delivered at outfall works 
at Nut Island. 

Studies of sewage flows indicate that the Metropolitan sewers and 
siphons are free from deposit. 

I wish to express my appreciation of the value of the services ren- 
dered to me by the assistants in their various capacities. 



FREDERICK D. SMITH, 

Engineer of Sewerage Works. 



' Boston, January 1, 1913. 



APPENDIX. 



156 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 1. 



Contracts made and pending during 

[Note. — The details of contracts made before 



Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



312 



3402 



346 



347 



3482 



3492 



350 



23-M2 



24-M2 



WORK. 



40-million-gallon 
engine. 



pumping 



30 water valves; 4 24-inch, 
8 20-inch, 12 16-inch, 6 12- 
inch valves. 

2 3-million-gaIIon pumping 
engines for Southern Ex- 
tra High Service Pumping 
Station. 



Southern Extra High Service 
Pumping Station. 

160 tons cast-iron water 
pipe: 25 tons 24-inch pipe 
with flexible joints; 20 
tons 30-inch straight pipe; 
85 tons 24-inch straight 
pipe; 20 tons 12-inch 
straight pipe and 10 tons 
6-inch straight pipe; and 
15 tons special castings. 

2 horizontal fire-tube boilers 
for Southern Extra High 
Service Pumping Station. 

Furnishing and placing 
about 1,200 cubic yards of 
loam at Southern Extra 
High Service Pumping 
Station. 

1,050 tons New River or Po- 
cahontas coal : 350 tons for 
Arlington Pumping Sta- 
tion, 700 tons for Spot 
Pond Pumping Station. 

5,500 tons Beaver Run coal 
for Chestnut Hill Pump- 
ing Stations. 



Num- 
ber 
of 
Bids. 



En- 
gine 
No. 1, 

5. 
En- 
gine 
No.2, 
7. 

10 



43 

z* 

10 



Amount of Bid. 



Next to 
Lowest. 



$105,700 00 
6,434 00 

7,886 00 

8,825 001 

21,148 00 
4,753 00 



1,685 00 



J3.88 and 
S4.68, July 
to Apr. , 

S4.78, Apr. 
to July. 

53.791 per 
ton. 



5. 

Lowest. 



$99,769 001 
5,000 001 

7,525 001 

8,738 00 

19,984 001 
4,672 501 



1,671 001 



SI. 301 per cu. 

yd. 



S3. 801 and 
§4.351 ton. 



S3. 75 per 
ton. 



Contractor. 



Holly Mfg. Co., Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

Pratt & Cady Co., 
Hartford, Conn. 



Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon 
Co., Cincinnati, O. 



A. Varnerin Co., Bos- 
ton. 

Warren Foundry and 
Machine Co., Phil- 
lipsburg, N. J. 



Robb Engineering Co. 
Ltd., Boston. 



T. H. Corrigan, Bos- 
ton. 



New England Coal and 
Coke Co., Boston, 



Gorman-Leonard Coal 
Co., Worcester. 



1 Contract based upon this bid. 



2 Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



157 



i 

i 



Appendix No. 1. 



THE Year 1912 — Water Works. 

1912 have been given in previous reports.] 



7. 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 
of Work. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1912. 



10. 

Value of Work 

done 
Dec. 31, 1912. 



I 



Sept. 21, 1909 



June 3, 1911 



Sept. 18, 1911 



Apr. 15, 1912 



I 



Mar. 28, 1912 



Apr. 4, 1912 



July 26, 1912 



Apr. 27, 1912 



Dec. 30, 1912 



July 8, 1911 



Oct. 24, 1911 



Sept. 4, 1912 



For pumping station superstructure complete 
with all appurtenances, $19,984. 

For 24-inch pipe with flexible joints, S30 per ton 
of 2,000 pounds; for all straight pipe, S23.50 per 
ton of 2,000 pounds; for special castings, $50 per 
ton of 2,000 pounds. 



For whole work, $1,671, 



For furnishing and placing loam, $1.30 per cubic 
yard. 



May 17, 1912 



July 13, 1912 



$99,500 00 
5,000 00 

15,000 00 



20,500 00 
4,763 28 



1,711 00 



4,474 28 



17,768 77 



3 Arlington Station. 



* Spot Pond Station. 



158 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during 



1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



25-M 



26-M 



27-M 



28-M 



29-M» 



30-M« 



Special 2 
Order. 

Special* 
Order. 



Special 
Order. 



Special 
Order. 



Special 2 
Order. 



Special* 
Order. 



Special* 
Order. 



2. 

WORK. 



Electric motor and centrif- 
ugal pump for Clinton 
Sewerage Pumping Sta- 
tion. 

450 tons B. C. C. Miller vein 
coal for Arlington Pump- 
ing Station. 

1,000 tons Georges Creek 
Cumberland coal for Spot 
Pond Pumping Station. 

7,000 tons Sonman coal for 
Chestnut Hill Pumping 
Stations. 

Dredging, pile driving, etc., 
connected with lowering 
of 20-inch siphon across 
Saugus River at Fox Hill 
Bridge. 

Repairing roof of Lower 
Gate Chamber at Wachu- 
sett Dam. 

6 sets steelwork for chambers 
for 36-inch valves. 

Installing transmission line 
from Wachusett Dam to 
Sewerage Pumping Sta- 
tion, Clinton. 

Furnishing and erecting fer- 
rolithic plate, plastering 
and concrete floor of lava- 
tory and locker room at 
Chestnut Hill Pumping 
Station. 

Plumbing in lavatory and 
locker room at Chestnut 
Hill Pumping Station. 

Building brick settings for 
two horizontal tubular 
boilers at Southern Extra 
High Service Pumping 
Station. 

Building and installing hy- 
draulic coal elevator at 
Southern Extra High 
Service Pumping Station. 

Furnishing steam piping, 
fittings and valves at 
Southern Extra High 
Service Pumping Station. 



3. 

Num- 
ber 
of 
Bids. 



Amount or Bid. 



4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 



$786 00 

$4.30 per ton. 

S5.05 per ton. 

$3.80 per ton. 

$1,300 00 



390 00 



693 00 



375 00 



960 00 



550 00 



306 00 



5. 

Lowest. 



$965 001,6 



$4,241 per 
ton. 



$4,801 per 
ton. 



$3,791 per 
ton. 



$1,100 001 



240 001 



540 001 



340 001 



850 001 



490 001 



302 671 



6. 

Contractor. 



Power Eqviipment Co., 
Boston. 



Bader Coal Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Locke Coal Co., Mai- 
den. 



Gorman-Leonard Coal 
Co., Worcester. 

The Snaire & Triest 
Co., New York, N.Y. 



W. P. Leavitt Sons Co., 
Newton. 



James Russell Boiler 
Works Co., Boston. 

Light, Heat and Power 
Corporation, Boston. 



Robert Gallagher Co., 
Boston. 



H. W. Orr Co., New- 
tonville. 



Walter H. Preble Co., 
Boston. 



F. S. Payne Co., Cam- 
bridge. 



Wm. H, Gallison Co., 
Boston. 



1 Contract based upon this bid. 
* Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



159 



THE Year 1912 — Water Works — Continued. 



7. 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1912. 



10. 

Value of Work 

done 
Dec. 31, 1912. 



May 31, 1912 

June 3, 1912 
June 5, 1912 

June 3, 1912 
June 27, 1912 

■. Oct. 11, 1912 

Aug. 14, 1912 
Aug. 19, 1912 

Oct. 9, 1912 



For whole work. 



Aug. 12, 1912 

Dec. 2, 1912 

Oct. 10, 1912 

Oct. 30, 1912 



$4.24 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered on cars at 
the Arlington Station. 

$4.80 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at 
the Spot Pond Station. 



5.79 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered on cars at 
Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations. 



For furnishing necessary labor and plant to do all 
dredging required, $1,100. 



For whole work, $1,100, 



For each set, $40, 

Cost of materials and labor plus 10 per cent., 

For whole work, $540, .... 






Oct. 9, 1912 

Oct. 14, 1912 

Oct. 25, 1912 

Nov. 5, 1912 



Nov. 6, 1912 



Dec. 21, 1912 



Dec. 13, 1912 



For whole work, $340, 



For whole work, $850, 



For whole work, 



For whole work, $302.67, 



$965 00 

1,282 36 

3,323 60 

12,294 89 

1,460 99 

1,100 00 

240 00 

2,704 53 



850 00 



490 00 



302 67 



$193,731 37 



' EflBciency considered, this was lowest bid. 

• Competitive bids were not received. 

' Competitive bids were received for materials only. 



160 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1912 — Water Works 

— Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts, i 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1912. 



Distribution Department, 7 contracts, . 

338 contracts completed from 1896 to 1911, inclusive, 



$146,474 28 
16,709,921 80 



Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the city of Boston, 
Total of 356 contracts, 



$16,856,396 08 
512,000 00 



$16,344,396 08 



1 In this summary contracts ciiarged to maintenance are excluded. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



161 



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w 


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1 


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CO 


CO 


us 


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CO 


CO 


CO 


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CO 


CO 


CO 


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CO 


CO 


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cs 


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o 


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cs 


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CO 


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cq 






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oo 


o 


CO 


c<« 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




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CO 


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yr 


m 


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cs 


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CO 


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CO 


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CO 


CO 


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CO 


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o 


o 


o 


o 


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CO 


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o 


CO 


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CO 


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CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


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cs 


us 


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CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


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CO 


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1 


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3 


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3 

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3 

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162 



:\IETROPOLITAX WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table Xo. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1912. 



Day of Month. 


a 


February. 


March. 


April. 


^ 

^ 


o 

c 

3 
►-s 


"3 
-i 


4^ 

3 
< 


B 

2 

1 


o 

1 

O 


1 
a 
S 

> 

1- 


1 


1 , - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


0.95 


- 


2, 










1 - 


- 


- 


s 


- 




- 


- 


S 




- 


1.21 


3, 
4, 
5, 










1 




1 


1.47* 


- 


0.10 


- 


0.27 


0.74 


- 


- 


- 










0.051 


- 


0.061 


_ 


X 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6, 










1 
1 _ 


- 


s 


- 


a 


0.21 


- 


- 


0.14 


- 


- 


0.47 


7, 
8. 
9, 










] 


- 


0.04 


0.47» 


s 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


1.76 


- 










0.72» 




0.27 


0.11* 


1.66 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




10. 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


s 


- 


0.18 


- 




11. 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.19 


0.98 


0.09 


i 


- 


- 


12. 










0.191 


- 


t 


0.13 


0.21 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.15 


- 


- 


13, 










- 


- 


1.50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


s 


- 


14, 










- 


- 


s 


s 


- 


- 


0.10 


- 


- 


- 


0.70 


- 


15, 










0.651 


- 


1.10 


0.27 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


16, 










- 


- 


- 


0.37 


0.95 


0.06 


- 


- 


1.00 


- 


- 


- 


17, 










0.051 


- 


- 


1 


- 


0.15 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18. 










- 


- 


- 


s 


- 


■- 


1.00 


0.68 


- 


- 


- 


X 


19, 










0.3S 


- 


- 


0.98 


- 


- 


- 


- 


t 


0.10 


- 


0.75 


20. 










- 


0.37» 


0.12 


- 


0.21 


- 


- 


0.38 


s 


- 


- 


- 


21, 










- 


i 


0.31» 


- 


0.45 


- 


0.95 


- 


0.16 


- 


- 


- 


22, 










• 


1.25» 


- 


0.27 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


i 


- 


- 


23, 










0.23» 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




0.17 


- 


1.40 


- 


- 


24, 










- 


- 


1.06» 


0.08 


0.40 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.10 


0.73 


0.451 


25. 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.25 


- 


- 


26. 










- 


0.90» 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- , 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27, 










- 


- 


- 


0.18 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.25» 


28, 










- 


- 


s 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.051 


- 


29. 










2 


- 


1.20 


X 


1 


- 


0.34 


- 


0.36 


- 


- 


- 


30. 










2 


- 


- 


0.04* 


i 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.11 


31. 










0.45» 




- 


- 


1.26 


- 


0.19 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


T 


otals 


' 


2.72 


2.52 


5.66 


4.37 


5.14 


0.52 


2.77 


2.48 


2.49 


2.18 


4.19 


5.24 



Snow. 



Total for the year 40.28 inches. 
* Rainfall included in that of following day. 



' Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



163 



Table No. 3. — Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in' 1912. 



Day of Month. 


3 
C 


Cm 

.a 


j3 
u 


< 


i 
s 


6 

G 
3 


1-^ 


+3 

CO 
S 
bO 

3 
< 


i 

S 
.2 
a 


i 
S 

u 

o 


O 
Xi 

g 

s 

> 
o 


u 

<a 

s 

o 
o 

Q 


1, 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


0.02 


0.53 


- 


2, 










- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


0.12 


2 


- 


- 


0.62 


3, 










- 


- 


- 


0.873 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 










- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.39 


- 


- 


- 


5, 










0.031 


- 


0.071 


0.033 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- - 


- 


2 


6, 










- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


0.21 


- 


- 


0.25 


- 


- 


0.41 


7, 










- 




0.053 


0.45 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


8, 










2 


- 


0.06 


- 


1.17 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.72 


- 


9, 










0.943 


- 


- 


0.053 


2 


- 


0.03 


- 


- 


0.03 


- 


- 


10, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


0.33 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.57 


0.88 


0.19 


2 


- 


- 


12, 










0.171 


- 


2 


0.07 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.11 


- 


0.011 


13, 










- 


- 


2.29 


- 


0.47 


- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


14, 










- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


0.03 


0.47 


- 


- 


0.66 


- 


15, 










0.953 


- 


1.17 


2 


- 


- 


- 


0.01 


2 


- 


- 


- 


16, 










- 


- 


- 


0.57 


2 


0.03 


- 


- 


0.65 


- 


- 




17. 










0.071 


- 


- 


2 


0.87 


0.07 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


-• 


1 ''■ 










2 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


0.90 


0.54 


- 


- 


- 


2 


19, 










0.10 


2 


2 


1.09 


- 


- 


- 


2 


0.02 


0.04 


- 


1.13 


20, 










- 


0.14 


2 


- 


0.08 


- 


- 


0.86 


0.03 


- 


- 


- 


21, 










- 


2 


0.643 


2 


0.35 


0.03 


1.18 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22, 










2 


1.343 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23, 










0.043 


- 


- 


0.39 


- 


- 


- 


0.04 


- 


2.14 




- 


24, 










- 


- 


0.973 


0.03 


0.10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.07 


0.57 


0.551 


25, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


0.17 


0.011 


- 


I 26, 










- 


2 


- 


2 


0.46 


0.04 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 " 










0.011 


1.16 


- 


0.05 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.27» 


r 28, 










- 


- 


2 


- 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


~ 




0.051 


- 


29, 










2 


- 


1.08 


2 


2 


- 


0.41 


- 


0.17 


- 


- 


- 


30, 










2 


- 


- 


0.523 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.03 


31, 










0.538 


- 


- 


- 


0.37 


- 


0.23 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


T 


otals 


• 


2.84 


2.64 


6.33 


4.12 


4.20 


0.38 


3.35 


2.92 


1.70 


2.58 


3.54 


5.02 



1 Snow. 



Total for the year 39.62 inches. 
2 Rainfall included in that of following day. 



« Rain and snow. 



164 



METROPOLITAN \YATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1912. 



Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Jan. 5, . 


.141 


7.00 A.M. to 2.00 P.M. 


May 5, . 


1 .49 


9.30 P.M. to 


Jan. 8, . 


1 .812 


6.00 P.M. to 


May 7, . 


1.15 A.M. 


Jan. 9, . 


9.30 A.M. 


May 8, , 


I .80 


4.50 A.M. to 


Jan. 12, . 


.221 


7.30 A.M. to 8.00 P.M. 


May 9, . 


5.20 A.M. 


Jan. 15, . 


1.091 


12.35 A.M. to 10.30 A.M. 


May 9, . 


1 .33 


4.20 P.M. to 


Jan. 15, . 


.23 


10.30 A.M. to 6.00 P.M. i 


May 10, . 


5.30 A.M. 


Jan. 17, . 


.131 


9.45 P.M. to 11.50 P.M. 1 


May 12, . 


1 .26 


10.30 A.M. to 


Jan. 19, . 


.14 


6.15 A.M. to 1.30 p.m. 


May 13, . 


9.00 P.M. 


Jan. 22, . 


.041 


8.45 p.m. to 11.50 P.M. 


May 16, . 


1 .78 


8.00 A.M. to 


Jan. 27, . 


.081 


7.30 A.M. to 4.30 P.M. 


May 17, . 


6.00 A.M. 


Jan. 29, . 


1 .561 


8.30 A.M. to 


May 21, . 


.32 


9.15 P.M. to 11.40 P.M. 


Jan. 30, . 


4.00 P.M. 


May 24, . 


.30 


5.30 P.M. to 8.30 P.M. 


Jan. 31, . 


.201 


6.30 A.M. to 2.30 P.M. 


May 26, . 


.40 


1.30 A.M. to 4.35 A.M. 








May 29, . 


} .38 


11.20 P.M. to 






Total, 


3.64 




May 31, . 
Total, . 


4.00 P.M. 




4.06 












Feb. 8, . 


.031 
.16 


3.10 A.M. to 8.00 A.M. 
2.10 A.M. to 9.30 A.M. 








Feb. 20, . 








Feb. 21, . 


1 1.08 


3.30 P.M. to 








Feb. 22, . 


7.10 A.M. 


June 6, . 


.30 


12.45 P.M. to 11.00 P.M. 


Feb. 26, . 


j 1.212 


8.00 P.M. to 


June 25, . 


1 .04 


6.00 P.M. to 


Feb. 27, . 


6.25 A.M. 


June 26, . 
Total, . 


2.15 A.M. 


Total, . 


2.48 


.34 




Mar. 4, . 


1 .081 


10.20 P.M. to 


Julv 11, . 


1.05 


11.00 A.M. to 12.15 P.M. 


Mar. 5, . 




4.40 A.M. 


July 11, . 


) .52 


2.30 P.M. to 


Mar. 6, . 


1 111 


5.30 P.M. to 


July 12, . 


12.15 A.M. 


Mar. 7, . 


^ «! 


3.40 A.M. 


July 18, . 


3.27 


10.15 A.M. to 11.30 P.M. 


Mar. 8, . 


.04 


9.20 P.M. to 10.30 P.M. 


July 21, . 


.95 


4.55 A.M. to 9.00 P.M. 


Mar. 12, . 


} 1.38 


2.00 P.M. to 


July 29, . 


.40 


8.30 A.M. to 11.50 A.M. 


Mar. 13, . 


7.45 P.M. 


July 29, . 


.03 


8.00 P.M. to 8.30 P.M. 


Mar. 15, . 


.93 


7.30 A.M. to 8.45 P.M. 


Aug. 1, . 
Total, 


.17 


2.10 A.M. to 7.30 A.M. 


Mar. 20, . 


.27 

.481 


12.25 A.M. to 6.40 A.M. 
3.55 A.M. to 9.40 P.M. 






Mar. 21, . 


6.39 




Mar. 24, . 


.551 


3.10 A.M. to 7.55 A.M. 








Mar. 24, . 


.41 

} '^^^ 
\ 1.00 


7.55 A.M. to 5.00 P.M. 
10.45 P.M. to 








Mar. 24, . 


1 




Mar. 25, . 
Mar. 28, . 
Mar. 29, . 


2.35 A.M. 
9.30 P.M. to 

2.00 P.M. 


Aug. 3, 
Aug. 11, 
Aug. 11, 
Aug. 14, 
Aug. 15, 




.14 
.45 
.20 
.06 
.33 


3.00 A.M. to 4.15 A.M. 

2.20 A.M. to 6.35 A.M. 

7.40 A.M. to 11.45 A.M. 


Total, • . 


5.36 


11.45 A.M. to 12.45 P.M. 
5.15 P.M. to 8.00 P.M. 








Aug. 18, 
Aug. 20, 




.48 
.53 


5.55 A.M. to 4.30 P.M. 








1.30 A.M. to 7.30 A.M. 


Apr. 1, . 
Apr. 3, . 


1 .86 


7.00 P.M. to 

4.10 A.M. 


Aug. 23, 




.05 


12.50 P.M. to 3.00 P.M. 








Apr. 5, . 


.082 


6.45 A.M. to 8.45 A.M. 


Total, 


2.24 




Apr. 7, . 


.092 


7.50 P.M. to 








Apr. 8, . 
Apr. 9, . 


12.50 A.M. 








1.00 P.M. to 10.30 P.M.' 






1 


Apr. 12, . 


.08 


4.15 P.M. to 8.00 P.M. 


Sept. 1, 
Sept. 2, 
Sept. 2, 
Sept. 3, 
Sept, 4, 


•\ 


2.30 P.M. to 


Apr. 14, . 


.23 


1.50 A.M. to 12.15 P.M. 


\ .45 


7.20 A.M. 


Apr. 15, . 


.04 


12.01 A.M. to 7.30 A.M. 


^ 


8.15 P.M. to 


Apr. 16, . 


.07 


1.20 A.M. to 7.30 A.M. 


> .04 


2.50 A.M. 


Apr. 16, . 


.11 


6.40 P.M. to 8.35 P.M. 


.04 


6.05 A.M. to 6.30 A.M. 


Apr. 17, . 


1 86 


6.30 P.M. to 


Sept. 6, 


.15 


2.30 A.M. to 5.45 A.M. 


Apr. 19, . 




1.35 P.M. 


Sept. 11, 
Sept. 15, 
Sept. 16, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 29, 

Total, 


.19 


1.45 P.M. to 5.30 P.M. 


Apr. 22, . 
Apr. 23, . 


:« 


2.05 A.M. to 

8.45 A.M. 


} ■" 

.05 


10.45 P.M. to 

3.45 A.M. 


Apr. 24, . 


.05 


6.30 P.M. to 8.30 P.M. 


8.30 P.M. to- 11.15 P.M. 


Apr. 27, . 


.10 


4.05 A.M. to 7.30 A.M. 


.09 


12.15 P.M. to 8.00 P.M. 


Apr. 29, . 


.44 


2.30 P.M. to 6.30 A.M. 








1.72 










Total, 


3.92 












1 Snow. 



2 Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



165 



Table No. 4. 



Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1912 — 
Concluded. 



Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Oct. 1, . 


.04 


3.20 P.M. to 3.40 P.M. 


Dec. 2, . 


.50 


2.30 P.M. to 10.00 P.M. 


Oct. 9, . 


} .05 


7.45 P.M. to 


Dec. 6, . 


.43 


2.30 A.M. to 7.45 A.M. 


Oct. 10, . 


3.25 A.M. 


Dec. 17, . 


} 1.25 


11.05 P.M. to 


Oct. 11, . 


I .09 


5.05 A.M. to 


Dec. 19, . 


2.30 P.M. 


Oct. 12, . 


7.30 A.M. 


Dec. 24, . 


.641 


7.15 A.M. to 4.45 P.M. 


Oct. 19, . 


.03 


1.15 P.M. to 6.00 P.M. 


Dec. 27, . 


1.13 


3.30 A.M. to 3.00 P.M. 


Oct. 23, . 


} 1.08 


10.15 A.M. to 


Dec. 27, . 


.151 


3.00 P.M. to 8.30 P.M. 


Oct. 24, . 


7.15 P.M. 


Dec. 30, . 


1.05 


7.00 A.M. to 7.35 P.M. 


Oct. 25, . 


1 .32 


10.00 A.M. to 


Jan. 1, . 


.05 


3.20 A.M. to 6.25 A.M. 


Oct. 26, . 


2.25 A.M. 


















Total, . 


5.20 










Total, 


1.61 


















Nov. 1, 


.56 


11.45 A.M. to 10.00 P.M. 




Nov. 7, 


1 1.24 


2.30 P.M. to 








Nov. 8, 


6.00 A.M. 








Nov. 13, 


I .54 


6.00 P.M. jto 








Nov. 14, 


9.00 P.M. 








Nov. 24, 


.45 


11.30 A.M. to 10.00 P.M. 








Nov. 28, 


.211 


10.30 A.M. to 3.35 P.M. 








Total, 


3.00 





Total for year 39.{ 
1 Snow. 



inches. 



166 



JMETROPOLITAN WATER 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



167 



03 


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3 



168 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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=« ?^ = fc 

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2c si 

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3 i'S os 
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rt " 5 « 

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fe"-, Moo 

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00 03 - 

« o >o 

- ^ 00s 

eo.-« 1— I 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



169 






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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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t^ 


CO 


y-i 


^ 


lO 


o 


"5 


C5 


CO 


c^ 








CO 


t^ 


03 


eo 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


g 


o 


o 


o 




o 




o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


s 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






























eo 


o 


f- 


■<4<" 


Ci 


■^ 


lO 


CO" 


cT 


o 


(m" 


kC 


>o 


oo 


CO 


eo 


<M 


00 


t^ 


CO 




r^ 


l^ 




00 


o 


o 


t^ 


t>. 


Tf 


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t-~ 


CO 


Z' 


lO 


" 


" 


'^ 






<>) 




iO 


1-1 




o 


o 


o 


o 


Q 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


^ 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


A 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


C3_ 


o 


C5 






























s; 


o" 


f— ( 


o 


CO 


Tt« 


CO 


t^ 


lO 


1— t 


y—i 


o 


CO 


■«1<" 


o 


o 


1-^ 


CO 


1-H 






lO 


o> 


'^ 


t^ 


o 


CO 


05 


CO 


^ 


t^ 


r^ 


CO 


CO 


z- 


•^ 


^ 


CO 






<M 


-<1< 


oo 


(M 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


5-, 


^ 


j-5 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


^ 


o 


o 


00 


o 


o 


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o 


o 


CD 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






























00 


o" 


>o 


t^ 


CO 


•«*l 


CO 


00 


Co" 


1— t 


CO 


CO 


t-T 


c<r 


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1— I 


CO 


o 


M 


05 


o 


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t^ 


CO 




o 


t^ 


":; 


CO 


tH 


00 


"*- 


>o 


CO 


CO 


"5 




rf 


»-H 


tn 


CO 


1-H 


TP 


lO 


































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(m" 


CO 


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^ 












^ 


CO 


^ 






o 


^ 


o 


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Q 


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o 


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Q 


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Q 


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t>^ 


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o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


eo 






























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CO 


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o 


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CO 


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<N_ 


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CD_ 


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lO 


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■^ 


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CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


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00 


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00 


CO 


00 


us 


eo 


00 


CO 


CO. 


■*- 


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CV| 


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rjT 


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^ 




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53 


o 


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CO 


^ 


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CO 


eq" 


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c<r 


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o 


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o 


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oo 


l^ 


(M 


C5 


o 


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00 


t^ 


t^ 




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o 


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00 


CO 


eo 


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CO 


eo 


in 


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'^ 


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CO 


^ 












^" 




































i 






























■*3 

a 
o 




















• 










S 


W 




























'S 


H 




























■*» 


iz; 
o 




























.2 


:^ 


















u 




(m 










>1 


>> 

u 












. 


o. 


tT 


6 
o 


Si 


i 


S 

V 








J3 
c3 


'(1 

a 

< 


g 

§ 


3 

•-5 


•-9 


-^ 
OS 

3 

to 

3 

<1 


o 

o 

o 


a 

o 

Q 


> 

< 





172 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



'■+3 
O 

O 



Ob 



00 






Q 



CO 



'T3 
CO 






00 

6 
< 





o 


o 


o 


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o 


o 


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s 


8 


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g 




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o 
o 


8. 


































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o 


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'^ 


>o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


cq- 


■* 




?* 




Ifl 


"5 








eo 


CO 


00 


o 


OS 


00 


OS 




t>. 


00 


CO 


CO 


eo 


CO 


1 


1 




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CO 


o_ 


o 










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^ 


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1 


1 








•^ 


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o 


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co- 


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lO 


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CO 




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00 


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r-H 


co 




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c<r 








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CO 


1—1 




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o 


o 


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o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








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s 


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00 


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cq- 


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CD 


t>- 


l^ 




00 


CO 


■<*< 


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(M 


OO 


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00 


o 


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co 


CO 




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-* 


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eo 


c<r 


00_ 

<m" 


■<*< 








c^ 


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t^ 


o 


CO 






o 


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o 


o 


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o 


o 


o 


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^ 


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o 


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si 


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o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


































9> 


o 


CO 


»o 


«— 4 


Ci 


00 


Tf< 


o 


OS 


CO" 


r>r 


lO 


r-t 


tc 




CO 


s. 


■^ 


lO 


t>- 


»« 


c^ 




00 


<M 


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OS 


00 


00 


CO 




iH 


00 


o 


1-H 


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c^ 


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<>> 


(M 




CO 


-* 


t-- 


CO 






o 


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o 


o 


o 


o 


Q 


<_,. 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


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o 


f^ 


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g 


o 






o 


o 


Q 




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o 


o 


o 


r^ 




































at 


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CO 


eo 


i>r 


CO 


eo 


03 


CO 


CO 


o 


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TjT 


U'S 


OS 




OO 




OO 


«o 


OS 


OO 




■^ 


CO 


o 




o 


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CO 




T-i 


o 

eo 


eo 


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eo 


iO 


■* 




" 


(N 


CO 


eo 


«o 


CO 


CO 






Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






r^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 




o 


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o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


































o> 


•^ 


oT 


CO 


»o 


CO 


00 


l^ 


C<J 


t^ 


C<I 


»o 


CO 


«5 


t^ 




00 


>o 


(N 


•<*< 


t->. 


CO 


CO 


o 


eo 


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t^ 




OS 


00 


■<*< 




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c^ 


>« 


CO 


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CO 


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CO 


C<l 


OS 


c^ 


t^ 






































"^ 


^ 


eo 


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'"' 










CO 


^ 




""■ 








o 


<_, 


Q 


o 


o 


c 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 






o> 


o 


Q 


o 


C3_ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


^5 


































00 


<n" 


CO 


00 


o 


o 


eo 


•>!tl 


CJ 


eo 


o 


1-H 


y—t 


CO 


Tft 




00 


00 


05 


eo 




00 


>o 


eo 


eo 


(M 


eo 


•<tl 


Tt< 


00 


•<*< 




iH 


t>. 




CO 


■"1 


OO 


CO 


CO 


■^, 


00 


CO 


05_ 


c^ 


CO 


OS 






































(N 


^ 


^ 


^ 








^ 




"^ 


^ 


co" 


T-H 








O 


O 


o 


g 


Q 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


<-, 


^ 


8 








o 


o 




o 






o 


o 










00 


Q 


o 


o 


Q 


^ 


<o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


Q 


o 


































s 


CO 


o 


oo" 


>i^ 


(M 


1-H 


t^ 


05 


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oT 


00 


CO 


t^ 


CO 




»o 


lO 


eo 


■^ 


CO 


(M 




t~ 


»o 


OS 


Ui 


^. 


OS 


iO 




^H 


o 


o 


w 


CO 


CO 


■>*l 


^H 


CO 




OS 


t^ 


CO 


OS 






































^ 


'-' 


CO 


<>r 


'^ 








"^ 


'■' 


C<i 


eo 


'~' 






















• 




• 








i 
































•»A 
































a 
































o 






















. 


. 


. 






a 




, 




























.a 




» 




























09 




&- 














. 










, 


• 


■u 




2: 
o 




























tn 
o 




1^ 


















u 




tT 






si 






t^ 














. 


Si 

a 

I 


C 


Si 
S 

o 


J2 


0) 


v 






S3 

>-> 


e3 


j3 




^ 

§ 


o 

a 




CO 

3 
< 


Si 

o 

•+S 

O 


s 


> 

< 


> 





eg 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



173 



13 

o 



<5^ 



00 
1—1 



CO 
O 












00 

6 






S 



»-H T-H C« 



8 



8 



»^ ec c<» T-i 



I - 



8 



8 8 8 



Oi Q Tt< 
•rH O r»< 
lO t~ ^H 



oq — H .-I 



8 



8 



8 



8 



8 



8 



(M .^ <-l T-l 



T I 



iC •-" -rf* 



^ « <N <-i »- 



O O 

8 8 



8 



8 8 

o o 



8 



8 



8 



8 



8 8 




8 




8 8 8 8 8 



8 



8 



8 8 



8 



8 



8 



8 



^ 1-H t^ 



8 8 



8 



8 



8 



8 8 

o o 

ec o 



8 



8 



o 

o ^ 



a 
o 

e 

GQ 

.2 

. 73 

^- t- J- M M 

SB'S- -.- .§«-ISg^^ 






• >-< 00 



T3 

J 

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•l!*<* 






•■^^'■^< 


05 


OS 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 


t>- 


00 


CO 


o 


«o 


t>. 


CO 


t^ 






*3 '^. 


^ 


^ 


o 


^ 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


1 o 




1 




(^ 


o 




Q 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


^ 


o 




o 




1 


o_ 


o 


^ 


o 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o 


o_ 


^ 


o_ 


o 


o 


































1 


OO* 


^^ 


>o 


t^ 


•** 


t~-" 


OS* 


f— « 


t^* 


00 


CO* 


00 


CO 




1 


Wai 

recei 

fro 

Wach 

Reser 


•^ 




o 


o 


l>. 


o 


CO 


CO 


W5 


>o 


00 


s 


CO 






»>._ 


^ 


co_ 


CO__ 


l>-^ 


lO 


«o 


-* 


"*. 


o_ 


CO_^ 








CO* 


00 


CO* 


o* 


c<r 


OS* 


o* 


l>.* 


00* 


o" 




o" 


c^* 




1 


o 




o 


t^ 


CO 


t^ 


lO 


!>. 


t^ 


o 


o 


o 


OS 








'^ 






'^ 




'^ 






'^ 


^ 


'^ 






j 




























s3 




i • 


. 


























^ 








c 

• 


c3 

3 

a 

»-5 






a 

< 


>> 


a 

3 


>-5 


05 

3 
M 

< 


s 


(U 

s 
o 


s 

> 
o 


E 
;5 


Total, 
Av. for : 





GO 



3 

2 

o 

XI 



3 

3 
C 
< 



3 

-a 

c3 
T3 



3 
cS 



^ a 

bO 03 

fl 3 



.J: 3 
g « 



176 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 









53 r- 



cc 


rH 


tJ 


II 


•«* 






CO 


a> 


•<o 


^ 




r( 


« 




.?-* 




^ 


O 



CO 






o 
< 





IC 


CO 


o 


^ 


us 


o 


'*! 


o 


us 


■* 


00 


r^ 


1 °^ 


6 


) '-'^■K 


o 


CO 


t^ 


^H 


05 


OS 


eq 


CO 


tH 


CO 


t^ 


C<l 


CO 


Pero 

age 

Rair 

col lee 


ec 


t^ 


t>. 


00 


•<*< 


05 






CO 






(M 


•^ 




3'^'-^ 


CO 


M 


^ 


00 


o> 


CO 


»-- 


Ttt 


Ci 


OS 


oo 


o 


CO 


J2^ o 1 




o 


a> 


eo 


us 


■^ 


o 




CO 


rt< 


us 








S ® t> 


^ 


-' 


•>* 


eo 


<?« 


o 


o 


o 


d 


O 


d 


'-' 


^ ' 


«8b 1 






























3's 


o 


^ 


oo 


CO 


CO 


t>. 


o 


CO 


CO 


OS 


•Tf 


CO 


c^ 






us 


CO 




M 


■^ 


o 


(N 


00 


OS 


eo 


OS 


1 




f^-S 


eo 


<N 


CO 


■* 


us 


o 


eo' 


CO 


,^ 


CO 


eo 


•Tf* 


o ' 




•Jc 


























•* 




tflzi 






























2 73 


O 


^ 


o 


^ 


g 


^ 


o 




o 


o 


^ 


o 


1 o 




« 5 






8 


3 




o 




o 


o 




o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o_ 


o_ 


O 


o 


o 


Q 


o_ 


o 
































<M 


>fl 


cT 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


i^r 


OS 


t^ 


CD 


■«1<" 




— Oh 


Tt< 


lO 


(M 


t^ 


o 


•* 


o 


Th 


oo 


CO 


CO 


CO 


p^ 








M 


'^l 


eo 


us 


t^ 


t- 


CO 


o 


00 


00 


00 


CO 
































"S 03 


*-4 


o 


00 


■^ 


us 


■* 




T— ( 


CO 


•<1<" 


us 


o* 


•^ 




^ ^ 




e^ 


•^ 


eo 


M 
















1-H 








1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


^ 


1 


o 


■o 


^ 


1 


1 


1 1 


















^ 




o 


o 


f^ 
























o 




o 


o 


o 












CO 
































to 












CO 




«-H 


co" 


t>r 












^ 












eo 




CO 


o 


00 






















CD 




us 




■^ 
























•<*!" 




t>r 


CO 


■»*<' 










m 




















l--< 












a 
































< 

OS 




























































o 
&5 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1 


Q 


1 


1 


1 


o 


o 


1 o 






o 












r^ 










o 


o 




CO 


• 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




Q 








^5 


o 


o 






^fi 
































(O 


o> 


C5 


r^ 


Oi 




US 








o 


o 


CO 






*cC 


o 


o 




00 


CO 




CO 








us 




CO 






o 


''I 


us 


*^. 


CO 


C<l_ 




us 








CO 


us 


o_ 






o 


CO 


VH 


c« 


^H 












^H 


o 


r-H 








"^ 


'"' 




















^ 




(h' 
































< 































■*^t^ 


1 


1 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 o 




^^° _. 








o 


















o 


Ph 








o 


















o 


H 


Wate 
wasted 
Outlet 

Lake 






(m" 


o" 


us 


eo 














ceT 


Ch 






us 




eo 
















CO 


OO 

o 






CO 


05_ 

cT 

C<1 


o 

CO 
















us 

00 


>J 






























< 






























1 Et3 00 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


^ 


•^ 


o 


o 


o 


^ 


^ 


• S 




12 O <D i- 


o 




o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 






o 




u 2 1* ci 
0> 'O ii o> S 


o 


o 


o 


<3 


o 


o 


^^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


^5 


o 
































to 


(>r 


00 


CO 


oT 


CO 


^H 


t>r 


o 


^H 


t^ 


o 


t^ 




e«3 




us 


l>. 


CO 


00 


t^ 


t-- 


CO 


t>. 






r» 




■§ o^CO « 


t-* 


•>*' 




t^_^ 


N 


■>* 










CO 


eo 


us 
































Water 
discharged 

through 
Cochituate 
Aqueduct. 


1 


^ 


1 


1 


1 


^ 


1 


o 


o 


^ 


o 


1 


1 O 






o 








o 




o 
o 


o 
o 


o 


8 










oi" 








o 




CO 


o* 


Os" 


CO 




»-H 






t^ 












CO 


CO 














CO 








CO 




00 


us 


Os" 


■^ 
■«*<" 




CO 




. S c 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


^ 


^ 


1 


1 o 




r re- 
fro: 
rnal 
ces. 




















■<1h" 


CO 




CO 




(t-d (u h 




















t^ 


y—^ 




T-^ 




-S £■►? 3 




















»— ( 










c3 > X o 






























u 
































• 




























S 


























i 




H 


























^ 




^1 


























>> 




O 


























u 




S 




. 






. 


. 








• 






o 










>> 

c3 

1 


1^ 


< 


^ 

s 


oT 

c 

►-S 


»-9 


09 


1 


1 

o 

o 


u 

B 

> 

o 


i 
s 

0> 


Total, 
Averag 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



177 









CO 

o 

o 

CO 
O 

o 



o 

CO 



CO 



e 
^ 



«o 

O 
•<s> 



1—1 

6 

H 
•J 

n 
< 





II 


nary 

Water 

5.00. 


o 


CO 


Ui 


o 


CO 


OS 




t^ 


CO 


OS 




CO 


OS 




CO 


o 


to 
c<« 


CO 

o 


CO 


CO 




CO 


o 


00 


OS 
"3 


eo_ 


CO 




« c5 


113 . o 


00 




00 


OS 


C3S 


OS 


CS 


CS 


CO 


00 


00 


00 


oo 




^^M 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


eo 


CO 


eo 


CO 


eo 


CO 




1^ 


O;?" 

S 


































eo 


oo 


■^ 




T*< 


CO 




■^ 


CS 


t>. 


00 


CO 


to 




es 


"3 
to 


OS 

o 


CO 






'*'. 
r^ 


CO 


o 


CS 

to 


o 

to 


eo 






5^ 

1^ 




CO 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


CO 




'2-fiM 

5;^" 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 






HH 






























g.h 


_ to . 


«o 


o 


to 


t^ 


CO 


t~ 


CO 


o 


CS 


o 


o 


eo 


t^ 




.s> 


o 

o 


Cl' 


•<* 




o 


CS 


00 


to 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 


eo 




^ S 


00 


00 


OS 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 




o ^ 


<M 


e^ 


(M 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




W« 
































h-- 




r^ 


t- 


00 


00 


M< 


CO 


CS 


to 


1^ 


CO 


00 


s 


Tt< 




^> 


^■gt^ 






o 


o 


o 




CO 


o 


OS 


!>. 




«« 




5 »H OS 


o 


•»t< 


CO 


»o 


^^ 


o 


00 


§ 


t^ 


«o 


CO 


tn 


CO 




3 © 


"3 


"S 


kO 


tei 


lO 




lO 


"3 


ko 


W5 


>o 


"3 






e^ 


e<» 


e^ 


CO 


CO 


eo 


CO 


eo 


CO 


CO 


eo 


eo 


CO 




COp^ 
































-71 .t: 




^ 


Ui 


r^ 


CO 


us 


»-o 


o 


■^ 


CO 


OS 


00 


eo 


■<*< 




c o 


^T3f<5 


»o 


"5 


CO 


00 


"S 




C>1 


CO 




OS 


CO 


CO 


U3 




=^ r 


-2 S"^ 


00 


<M 


t^ 


■^ 


iti 


»o 


to 


kO 


U3 


r»< 


•«*< 


•«*< 


■* 












CO 


CO 






eo 


CO 


eo 


eo 


eo 








c^ 


e^ - 


c^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


C<l 


cq 


5 
o 




^ 'J^' 


o 


CO 


r^ 


o 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


OS 


oo 


<_, 


o 


eo 


lO 


CO 

1 


CO tio 
^ go 


o 


C5 
CO 


CS 
CO 


00 
CO 


C5^ 
CO 


o 
to 


1— 1 

CO 


■^ 


CO 

CO 


LO 


CS 


o 


CS 

■>*l 


K 


00 


00 


CC 


QO 


oo 




00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


oo 




































^ '^^• 


« 


CO 


•^ 


o 


CO 


t^ 


8 


«o 


r^ 


t^ 


t^ 


t* 


eo 


Cfl 




<N 






iC 


•* 


CO 




o 


o 


m 




eo 




6 


5? u'^. 


t^ 


t>. 


o 


to 


t^ 


l^ 


r- 


r^ 


t^ 


r^ 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


< 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 


r- 


r^ 


i^ 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 






t>- 




































^ "^ ^' 


CO 


lO 


00 


>* 


•^ 


CO 


to 


eo 


B 


CO 


»o 


CO 


co 


^^ 


vM 


~i3t: 


t>. 


o 


00 


CO 


OS 


OS 


CO 




o 


00 


CO 


OS 


s 




5 t-c^. 




























K 


o 


^ go 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 


00 


t>. 


t^ 


CS 


CS 


CS 


OS 


s 


00 


t^ 


«o 


to 


o 


o 


CO 


to 


to 


to 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 






































11 


00 


OS 


CO 


CS 


»*< 


^^ 


_ 


eo 


o 


eo 


CO 


CO 


8 




05 


OS 

o 

OS 




o 


CS 
Cs' 

CS 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 

8 


OS 

CS 
OS 




Jioi 


^H 


^H 


CO 


^ 


^H 


CO 


C4 


C4 


CO 


C4 


eo 




CO 




•Sf II 






























tf 
































HH 
































































OS 


■^ 


^^ 


■>*< 


ta 


^H 


8 


Of) 


00 


lO 


CS 


eo 


CS 




■►^"S 


t^ 


CO 


to 


CS 


00 


CO 


00 


t^ 


«o 


Ui 




o 






^w 


«3 


C<1 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


CO 


CO 


_l 


s 


CO 




^7 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


o 


to 


to 


to 


CO 


CO 


CO 






H- ( 
































U 
































<S> 
































^ 05 


U3 


CO 


CO 


00 


o 


eo 


00 


•^ 


1-H 


CO 


■^ 


eo 


00 




£"2 


o» 

to' 




"3 


p 

oo' 


CS 


CO 

OS 


oo' 


OS 




l^ 


00 


oo' 


00 




c3 o 


— «5 


U3 


«o 


«« 


«5 


LO 


lO 


•o 


o 


iO 


"i 


tn 


»o 


»o 




5=^^ 


.SPlI 

KH 
1— ( 






























































a> 


a> . 






























-tj 




»-i 


N 


o 


to 


o 


to 


t>. 


s 


to 


00 


00 


t^ 


U3 








ffO 


00 


t- 


00 


CO 


eo 


t^ 


l>. 


OS 


CO 


•* 


o 




o 


V4 


co 


CO 


•>*< 


•«*' 


eo 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


CO 




_ -^ 


rjt 


Tt< 




•^ 


M< 


•Tfl 


■<»< 


■^ 


-^ 


-n 


•^ 


Tf< 


•^ 




hH>ti 


X.2, 


1-1 


^— 1 


»H 


r— 4 


^H 


V.H 


















o 


.a II 






























O 


f^ 
































§^5 




























3 


Li 


CO 


T*« 


CS 


to 


oo 


•>*< 


to 


tn 


to 


CO 


o 


■tl 


to 


_ o 


00 
CO 


»>• 


CS 

CO 


00 

CO 


00 

CO 


•>*< 


to 
eo 


o 

eo 


to 

CO 


eo 


CO 


o 


OS 
CO 








CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


CO 








ei" 


e^* 


c>f 


e-f 


eo" 


CO* 


co" 


CO* 


CO* 


cq" 


eo" 


eo" 


CO 






































OS 

1-H 


OS 


OS 


CS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


CS 


OS 


OS 


CS 


OS 


OS 




P 




1.N 


-r 


-<" 


- 


-r 


- 


-^" 


-r 


-" 


-r 


^ 


-: 


y-l 








g 

•^ 


i 




1 

<: 


1^ 


3 


•-9 


< 




■8 

o 


> 


i 


d 

a 



178 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been 
drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District. 

From Wachusett Reservoir into the Wachusett Aqueduct. 



Month. 



January, 
February, 
March, . 
April, 
May, 
June, 
July, 
Augxist, . 
September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 
Totals, 



Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 



27 
24 
9 
16 
31 
28 
27 
16 
23 
31 
29 
31 



292 



Actual Time. 



Hours. 



275 
311 
91 
320 
705 
453 
404 
242 
306 
473 
516 
537 



4,638 



Minutes. 



28 
57 
36 

58 



5 

4 
31 
43 

20 

28 



10 



Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 



2,073.9 
3,444.9 

729.5 
2,303.2 
4,121.2 
2,390.5 
4,672.3 
2,406.8 
2,359.0 
3,107.4 
3,046.8 
3,125.3 



33,780.8 



Total actual time, 193.26 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 33,780,800,000 gallons. 

From Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston. Aqueduct to Weston Reservoir. 



Month. 


Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 


Actual Time 
(Hours). 


Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 


January, 
February, 
March, . 
April, . 
May, . 
June, 
July, . 
August, 
September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 


















31 
29 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 


744 
696 
744 
720 
744 
720 
744 
744 
720 
744 
720 
723 


1,131.7 
1,056.3 
1,109.1 
1,066.4 
1,131.7 
1,101.7 
1,136.6 
1,129.6 
1,106.8 
1,177.3 
1,110.5 
1,149.5 


Totals, 


366 


8,763 


13,407.2 



Total actual time, 365.13 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 13,407,200,000 gallons. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



179 



Table No. 13 — Continued. 

From Framingham Reservoir No. 2 through the Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 



Month. 


Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 


Actual Time 
(Hours). 


Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 


January, 
February, 
March, . 
April, . 
May, 
June, 
July, . 
August, 
September, , 
October, 
November, . 
December, . 


















31 
29 
18 


744 
694 
412 


310.0 
289.2 
171.7 


Totals, . 


78 


1,850 


770.9 



Total actual time, 77.08 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 770,900,000 gallons. 



From Framingham Reservoir No. 3 through the Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 



Month. 



Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 



Actual Time 
(Hours). 



Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 



January, 
February, 
March, . 
April, . 
May, 
June, 
July, . 
August, 
September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 
Totals, 



31 
29 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 
31 
29 
20 
29 
31 



353 



744 

696 

744 

696 

744 

716.5 

744 

724 

670.5 

441 

692.5 

744 



8,356.5 



2,584.7 
2,533.5 
2,244.9 
2,110.8 
2,270.0 
2,267.4 
2,545.4 
2,105.2 
1,881.3 
1,599.3 
2,184.3 
2,067.1 



26,393.9 



Total actual time, 348.19 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 26,393,900,000 gallons. 



180 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 13 — Concluded. 
From Lake Cochituate through the Cochituate Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 



Month. 


Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 


Actual Time 
(Hours). 


Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 


January, 


- 


- 




February, 




















15 


333.75 


182.1 


March, . 




















- 


- 


- 


April, . 




















- 


- 


- 


May, . 




















- 


- 


- 


June, 




















16 


384 


186.3 


July, . 




















- 


- 


- 


August, 




















17 


383 


270.5 


September, 




















30 


718 


477.9 


October, 




















14 


332 


292.0 


November, 




















8 


149 


132.4 


December, 




















- 


- 


- 


Totals, 


100 


2,299 


1,541.2 



Total actual time, 95.82 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 1,541,200,000 gallons. 

Table No. 14. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 

1912 hy Months.^ 



Month. 


Wachusett 
Aqueduct 

into 
Sudbury 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


Weston 

Aqueduct 

into 

Metropolitan 

District 

(Gallons). 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
into 
Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


Cochituate 

Aqueduct 

into 

Chestnut Hill 

Reservoir 

(Gallons). 


January, . . ... 


66,748,000 


36.507,000 


93,377,000 


- 


February, . 












118,634,000 


36,424,000 


97,335,000 


6,279,000 


March, 












23,365,000 


35,777,000 


77,955,000 


- 


April, . 












76,607,000 


35,547,000 


70,360,000 


- 


May, . 












132.774,000 


36,506,000 


73,226,000 


- 


June, . 












79,507,000 


36,723,000 


75,580,000 


6,210,000 


July, . 












150,529,000 


36,664,000 


82,110,000 


- 


August, 












77,461,000 


36,439,000 


67,910,000 


8,726,000 


September, 












78,457,000 


36,893,000 


62,710,000 


15,930,000 


October, 












100,058,000 


37,977,000 


51,590,000 


9,419,000 


November, . 












101,383,000 


37,017,000 


72,810,000 


4,413,000 


December, . 












100,648,000 


37,081,000 


66,681,000 


- 


Average, 


92,126,000 


36,632,000 


74,221,000 


4,211,000 



1 Not including quantities wasted while cleaning and repairing aqueducts. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



183 




184 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



185 






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METROPOLITAN WATER 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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188 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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190 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 24. — {Meter Basis.) Average Daily Consumption of Water during 
the Year 1912, in the Cities and Tovms supplied by the Metropolitan Water 
Works, including Boston, Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Everett, Quincy, 
Medford, Melrose, Revere, Watertown, Arlington, Lexington, Milton, Stone- 
ham, Winthrop, Swampscott, Belmont and Nahant. {For Consumption of 
Water in Whole Metropolitan Water District, see Table No. 28.) 





Average 




Consumption 


Month. 


Daily 


Estimated 


per 


Consumption 


Population. 


Inhabitant 




(Gallons). 




(Gallons). 


January, 


136,635,300 


1,072,760 


127 


February, . 




















137,390,800 


1,074,790 


128 


March, 




















118,574,300 


1,076,820 


110 


April, 




















111,699,100 


1,078,840 


104 


May, . 




















112,689,400 


1,082,570 


104 


June, . 




















117,470,900 


1,087,610 


108 


July, . 




















119,617,900 


1,092,080 


110 


August, 




















112,578,700 


1,091,780 


103 


September, 




















110,816,500 


1,091,400 


102 


October, 




















108,166,000 


1,091,430 


99 


November, 




















104,026,400 


1,093,040 


95 


December, 




















105,793.300 


1,095,070 


97 


For the year 


f 


















116,230,700 


1,086,690 


107 



In addition to the above quantities, Wakefield was supplied with 13,327,(XX) gallons, equivalent to a 
daUy average rate of 36,400 gallons, the United States Government Reservation on Peddocks Island 
with 41,698,700 gallons, equivalent to a daily average rate of 113,900 gallons, and a part of Saugus with 
6,411,400 gallons, equivalent to a daily average rate of 17,500 gallons. 

The above table includes the Hyde Park district. 

Included in above quantities is 34,971,000 gallons supplied to the Hyde Park district from local 
sources which were discontinued February 5th. 



Table No. 25. — {Meter Basis.) Average Daily Consumption of Water in 
Gallons, from the Low-service System in 1912. 























Southern 
Low Service. 


Northern 
Low Service. 


1 

1 


Month. 


Boston, 

excluding 

East Boston 

and 
Chariest© wn. 


Portions of 

Charlestown, 

Somerv'ille, 

Chelsea, 

Everett, Maiden, 

Medford, East 

Boston and 

Arlington. 


1 

i Total 

Low-service 
1 Con- 
sumption. 


January, 
February, 
March, 
April, . 
May, . 
June, . 
July, . 
August, 
September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 




















60.398,100 
60.011.700 
50,862,900 
46,980,600 
47,618,400 
47,674,700 
48,787,800 
47,480,500 
46,636,200 
46,578,700 
46.099.900 
46.991,100 


31.177.500 
31.005.900 
25.844,600 
24,156,900 
22,715.600 
23,648,900 
23,914,900 
22,615,600 
22,095,300 
21.161.200 
20,370,700 
20.728,400 


1 

1 91,575,600 
91.017.600 
76,707.500 
71,137,500 
70,334,000 
71.323.600 
72,702,700 
70,096,100 
68,731,500 
67.739,900 
66,470,600 

1 67,719,500 


For the 


rear, 


















49,651.100 


24,099,000 


73,750,100 






No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



191 



Table Xo. 26. — (Meter Basis.) Average Daily Consumption of Water, in 
Gallons, from the High-service and Extra High-service Systems in 1912. 















South ERX 
High Service. 


: Southern ! 

Extra High ! 

Service. 


Northern 
High Service. 


Northern 

Extra High 

Service. 


Month. 


Quincy, 
Watertown, 
and Portions 

of Boston, 

Belmont and 

Milton. 


Portions of 

Boston 
and Milton. 


Revere, Winthrop, 
Swampscott, 
Nahant, Stone- 
ham, Melrose, 
and Portions of 
Boston, Chelsea, 
Everett, Maiden, 
Medford and 
Somerville. 


Lexington 

and 

Portions 

of Arlington 

and 

Belmont. 


January, 
February, 
March, 
April, . 
May, . 
June, . 
July, . 
August, 
September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 












35,458,100 
35,849,800 
32,170,000 
31.764,100 
33,105,400 
34,900,000 
35,185,100 
32,665,100 
33,034,500 
31,737,300 
29,442,700 
30,085,700 


739,300 
777,100 
756,700 
778,500 
846,700 
987,700 
1,023,700 
797,200 
810,500 
881,900 
829,600 
817,100 


8,079,500 
8,929,700 
8,087,800 
7,131,600 
7,450,400 
9,079,600 
9,427,000 
8,006,800 
7,543,900 
7,072,000 
6,636,000 
6,509,700 


782,800 

816,600 

852,300 

887,400 

952,900 

1-, 180,000 

1,279,400 

1,013,500 

696,100 

734,900 

647,500 

661,300 


For the : 


rear. 




32,941,100 1 


837,400 i! 7,826,100 2 

! i: 


876,000 



In addition to the above ^ the United States Grovernment Reservation on Peddocks Island was 
supplied with a daily average rate of 113,900 gallons, and ^ part of Saugus with a daily average rate of 
17,500 gallons, and Wakefield with a dailj' average rate of 36,400 gallons. 

The above table includes Hyde Park district. 

Included in above quantities is 34,971,000 gallons supplied to Hyde Park district from local sources 
which were discontinued February 5th. 



192 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






60 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



195 



Table No. 28. — (Pump Basis.) Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan 
Water District, as constituted in the Year 1912, and a Small Section of the 
Town of Saugus, from 1893 to 1912. 

[Gallons per day.] 



Month. 


1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


January, 


75,209,000 


67,506,000 


68,925,000 


82,946,000 


85,366,000 


February, 








71,900,000 


68,944,000 


80,375,000 


87,021,000 


83,967,000 


March, 








67,638,000 


62,710,000 


69,543,000 


86,111,000 


82,751,000 


April, 








62,309,000 


57,715,000 


62,909,000 


77,529,000 


79,914.000 


May, 








61,025,000 


60,676,000 


65,194,000 


73,402,000 


76,772,000 


June, 








63,374,000 


68,329,000 


69,905,000 


77,639,000 


77,952,000 


July, 








69,343,000 


73,642,000 


69,667,000 


80,000,000 


85,525,000 


August, . 








66,983,000 ' 


67,995,000 


72,233.000 


78,537,000 


84,103,000 


September, 








64,654,000 


67,137,000 


73,724,000 


74,160,000 


84,296,000 


October, . 








63,770,000 


62,735,000 


67,028,000 


71,762,000 


79,551,000 


November, 








61,204,000 


62,231,000 


64,881,000 


71,933,000 


72,762,000 


December, 








66,700,000 


65,108,000 


70,443,000 


79,449,000 


76,594,000 


Average, 


66,165,000 


65,382,000 


69,499,000 


78,360,000 


80,793,000 


Population, 








723,153 


743,354 


763,557 


786,385 


809,213 


Per capita. 








91.5 


88.0 


91.0 


99.7 


99.8 



Month. 


1898. 


1899. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


January, 


83,880,000 


96,442,000 


100,055,000 


111,275,000 


118,435,000 


February, 








87,475,000 


103,454,000 


98,045,000 


117,497,000 


117,268,000 


March, 








85,468,000 


90,200,000 


97,753,000 


105,509,000 


108,461,000 


April, 








76,574,000 


86,491,000 


89,497,000 


93,317,000 


103,153,000 


May, 








76,677,000 


89,448,000 


87,780,000 


95,567,000 


106,692,000 


June, 








83,463,000 


97,691,000 


98,581.000 


103,420,000 


110,002,000 


July, 








88,228,000 


96,821,000 


107.786.000 


106,905,000 


108,340,000 


August, . 








87,558,000 


92,072,000 


102.717.000 


102,815,000 


107,045,000 


September, 








88,296,000 


91,478,000 


103,612.000 


102,103,000 


107,752,000 


October, . 








81,770.000 


89,580,000 


98.358,000 


103,389,000 


105,560,000 


November, 








78,177,000 


86,719,000 


93,648,000 


101,324,000 


105,175,000 


December, 








86,355,000 


85,840,000 


97,844,000 


113,268,000 


125,434,000 


Average, 


83,651,000 


92,111,000 


98,059,000 


104,645,000 


110,345,000 


Population, 








832,042 


854,870 


877,698 


892,740 


907,780 


Per capita, 








100.5 


107.8 


111.7 


117.2 


121.6 



196 



INIETROPOLITAX WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table Xo. 28. — (Pump Basis.) Consumption of Water, etc. — Concluded. 

[Gallons per day.] 



Mo 


VTH. 


i 1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


January, . 


. 


125,176,000 


137,771,000 


130,878,000 


126,093,000 


137,730,000 


February, 








122,728,000 


143,222,000 


140,595,000 


130,766,000 


150,822,000 


March, 








111,977,000 


123,334,000 


120,879.000 


123,570,000 


134,202,000 


April, 








107,179,000 


108,688,000 


111,898,000 


118,428,000 


121,556.000 


May, 








111,589,000 


111,715,000 


115,804,000 


122,404,000 


123,502,000 


June, 








105,590,000 


111,209,000 


117,441,000 


121,882,000 


125,623,000 


July, 








107,562,000 


113,584,000 


124,769,000 


118,726,000 


128,779,000 


August, . 








103,570,000 


112,836,000 


121,158,000 


120,591,000 


131,098,000 


September, 








106,772,000 


114,188,000 


120,103,000 


121,685,000 


124,751,000 


October, . 








103,602,000 


108,290,000 


118,301,000 


116,561,000 


124,051,000 


November, 








103,477,000 


108,054,000 


116,693,000 


113,746,000 


119,627,000 


December, 








114,721,000 


125,119,000 


122,696,000 


130,995,000 


122,407,000 


Average, 


110,277,000 


118,114,000 


121,671,000 


122,085,000 


128,561,000 


Population, 








922,820 


937,860 


955,920 


981,690 


1,007,520 


Per capita, 








119.5 


125.9 


127.3 


124.4 


127.6 



Mo 


NTH. 1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


January, . 




132,376,000 


133,275,000 


127,568,000 


123,281,000 


137,277,000 


February, 








146,199,000 . 


130,763,000 


131,093,000 


124,359,000 


141,440,000 


March, 








128,884,000 


126,842,000 


117,078,000 


116,669,000 


122,804.000 


April, 








128,926,000 


125,335,000 


112,775,000 


111,656,000 


113,308,000 


May, 








131,040,000 


123,305,000 


112,073,000 


118,095,000 


114,548,000 


June, 








139,843,000 


125,179,000 


114,082,000 


114,145,000 


118,793,000 


July, 








138,232,000 


126,765,000 


122,743,000 


123,052,000 


120,261,000 


August, . 








128,073,000 


121,781,000 


118,373,000 


111,991,000 


112,968,000 


September, 








129,972,000 


118,043,000 


112,434,000 


108,726,000 


112,352,000 


October, . 








124,189,000 


115,939,000 


112,332,000 


106,873,000 


110,220,000 


November, 








117,119,000 


111,664,000 


107,528,000 


105,373,000 


109,289,000 


December, 








124,468,000 


115,733,000 


121,994,000 


104,592,000 


110,114,000 


Average, 


130,712,000 


122,851,000 


117,458,000 


113,951,000 


118,546,000 


Population, 








1,025,890 


1,051,420 


1,076,930 


1,102,210 


1,128,470 


Per capita. 








127.4 


116.8 


109.1 


103.4 


105.1 



Newton has not been supplied from the Metropolitan Works, but Hyde Park was supplied as part 
of Boston after February 5, 1912. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



197 





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a,c3 
3^. 


a 


c 


a 


a 


a § a 


^ 


d 


a 










a 


Cl 




CTt 


01 


rt 


3 « 3 






ed 










ta 


l=* 


> 


> 


P^ 


\^ 


;s^ 


fe t=H 


> 


> 


p^ 








b: 


•pjepumg 




e^ 


t« 


oq 


»« 


00 


C-1 


»-i CO 


»o 







OS 




o 


i-H 






CJ 


e-j 


(M 


CO 


CO 1-1 




CO 


CO 


y-t 


o 


o 

o 


uinui^'Eij; 






























c3 






I 


CJ 1 


d^ 


I 6 


1 


6 1 


d 








33^ 


-iJ 


-i-i 


:23S3'bl) 


33 -^ 


73- 


3!^ 


3+i 






< 


•■^uaiutpag 


§ 


ciJS 


j3 
bO 


bC 


a 


<A 2 


V^ 


s !r! bfl 


03 

C3 


c3 2 


03 -a 






•< 







oj-Sr 









« 


. 


»:5 





u< 










u 


M 


M 


OQ 


U 





> 


Q OQ 





U 


m 












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•ti 


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■fj 


■ui 


■iJ -4-^ 






+» 










^ 




^ 


rC 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ ^ 






M 










bC 




bfi 


bD 


bfl 


bo 


bfl 


bfl bfl 


■h> 


-tj 


bfl 








•A^ipiqjnx 


"m 


'm 


"m 


'rt 


"w 


"m 


'm 


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-a 

bC 


bfl 


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> 


S 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


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CQ 


CQ 


> 








r-< 


i« 


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- 


CO 


CO 


- 


i« «5 


- 


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CO 






•uopoenoo JO a^BQ 


a 

4 




S3 




>> 

1 


C 
3 









i 


h 















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<M 


t^ 


CO 


OS CO 


CO 


-H 


y-i 


1 






00 




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t^ 






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• 






•jaqran^ij 


OS 




CO 


00 
00 
Oi 


-* 
§ 


§ 


§ 


Tt< CO 
— C^l 




OS 

2 


00 
CO 




S 


> 

< 





No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



201 



o 

CO 

eo 

O 



a 

g 



^i 



CO 

o 
c 



<» 
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O 



CO 
CO 

d 

< 











o 


o 




o 


^ 


o 


t» 


eo 


CO 


t^ 


1 




'ssaupjBjj 




<N 


e^j 


-< -^ (M 


CI 


Cl 


CI 


- 


-^ 


— 


- 


•pauinsTioo uaSAxQ 




ec 


eo 


<rq M CO 

CO CO CO 


CO 
CO 


i-O 
CI 


CI 


CI 

eo_ 


00 

Cl 





OS 
CI 


z 




^ 


o 


_ 


— — o 


01 


Q 


„ 


Q 


^ 





Q 




(^5 


o 


o 


o o o 


n 


^— ^ 


<^ 


o 


^ 







a 


•sa^iJ-^T]^ 


(*^ 






o o o 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


^ 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 









§5 




























o 


o 


<=> 


o o o 


— , 


o 


o 


o 








<M 




CO 


iO 


eo 


c^ o o 


o 


lO 


c? 










^ 






o 








o 


o 


^ 











*=! 


o 


p 


p p p 


p 


p 


p 


p 


p 


■ 


'^■ 




1 


-If" 


00 


00 


CO l-O ■»»< 


o 


-i< 


OS 


eo 


eo 


,^ 







"auiao[4;j ' 


CO 


eo 


eo 


CO eo CO 


"*. 


eo 


eo 


■^ 


eo_ 


eo 


eo 








CO 


o 


C>J 


•«*< 50 o 


OO 


rtt 


00 


•«ti 








■^ 






•pepuadsng 


o 


to 

o 


eo 

p 


CO CO M 

o o o 


s 


CI 


CO 

o 


lO 


CO 


CJ 


CO 




2 
o 

s 

ffl 




o 


p 


p 


p p p 


p 


•^ 


p 


'^ 


'-'• 


'^■ 


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00 


(M 


«o 


C^ (M CO 


CI 


o 


CJ 


c? 








OS 


►-4 

Z 
O 


•paA^ossiQ 


o 


P 


o 
p 


O T}< <M 

p p p 


CO 

p 


o 
p 


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p 


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p 


p 


p 


p 


























^ 






o 


00 


00 


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r^ 


^ 


o 


o 





(M 


rjt 


s 


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eo 


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CO 


t^ 


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o 


p 


=. 


p p p 


P 


p 


p 


p 


p 


p 


p 




■«1< 


■* 


•* 


00 o o 


•^ 


00 


o 


CI 








00 








<M 


<M 


— •-> C-1 


CI 




CI 




CI 


Cl 






•99JJ 


o 


O 






o 


o 


o 


o 














o 


p 


'-'• 


<=> p = 


p 


p 


p 


p 


^ 


p 


p 


H 6 . 


•uopmSi 


o 


o 
o 


o 


o «o o 


o 

CI 


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§ 


o 

CO 






»o 


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CI 


a "■- o 


uo sscrj 


-H 


— 


^ 


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-H 


— 


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^ 


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-; 


































o 


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o 


o 


o 


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uo 





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M 


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CI 


>-o 


OS 


o 


t^ 


CI 


00 


O 




eo 


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. 




























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n 




























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CJ 


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> 


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> 


bp 


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> 


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, 


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Si 


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Sort 


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C) 


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bd 














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f2 


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on 


00 -* o 

00 OS C5 




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3 


> 








OS 


OS 


o> 


OS CS OS 


o 


O 


o 








< 


1 



202 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 









C3 



o 
o 

5- 









C5 



60 



CO 

6 

n 
< 



'BsaupjBjj 



•pauinsno^ uaSi^xQ 






•sa^u:^!^ 



•sa;Bj[^i>j 



oooooroooooooooooocoooooooooo 

OOOSOtMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOSOOOOOO 

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 



CCMO(NM«5>fl'^OCCOt>OiOt»0000'*<"5»CrorO-^CCOOOO»-i<N'-' 

OO0O00000O0C3O0O00O0O00OO0OO0 
OOOOO'^iMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



•auuoiriQ 



papnadeng 



•paApssiQ 



'moj^ 



•aajj 



•^00 50'^ t>. O OS O 0» CO T»H 0> lO C5 O >0 CO !M CO 00 05 »o o -^ >o 

e<0 — H <M ;<1 -^ O CO C^ C-» CSl <M •* CO C^ -# -^ CO Tt< <>J r-( O C^l (M CC <M CO — I 

OOOOO'^ OO OO O O O O O O O O O ^ CO o o o o o o 

OOOOOO I ooooooooo oooooooooooo 



t^ t^ CO C5 CD •»*< t^ CO o •* CO t^ CO CO o lo oo CO CO CO r^ 05 t-i ic (^ o >c 

CO "^ >-l O C> lO O CO CO CO CO >— I 0» CD b» T-l O ■<*( CO (>• 05 "-i CO CO —"-I O 

_ _ .^ ,^ O -^ _ -H ^H -H -^ CO '-C --I CO CO CO CO CO -H "-H -H ^H — I .-H ^H -H 

OOOOOO I ooooooooooooooooooooo 



OiCC005COOC5iC-HC^Tj<U5eocD-H»0->*<00'-i05t~-eot>-000'«*<00 

t--co'«*<co'-<r^oco'0'>*<'<*<iccoco'— i-Hcoco05cDooO'«*<ect>-eo>oco 

_,^_(_(_lf5,^_<,^,-<,-H,-(COCOCOCOCOCOC0COCO-<*<'-<.-i— l.-i.-i--( 
OOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



0-^CO-^t^»OC5CO»OCOCOt--.COOS'-cCOOOCO>i5COr»OOeOCOOO'<fOOCD 

COC0C0C0C0CO00C0C0-^COC0»O-^»O'»*<-*l-<tl>ACD>— HCCOCO"— c-Ct-i-h 
OOOOOCOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOCCSOO 
OOOOO-^OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



fr, 


i 


O 


o 






a 


o 


m 


a< 


W 


<! 


K 


> 



no sso^ 



mox 



i-^T— (f-H»-H*-HlO .-Ht-Ht— lT-41 



icococococoeoeocoeoeo' 



O 

O 



uinupBU 



s 

CO 



o 

o 



H^ -t^ -u -1^ -t^ 

caacG 

fiflflflfiflcaaciaflflccfiCGcccccccflac 
?<SSftSoooooooooc>oooooocoooooo 



. *3 S S ^S' 

. . -T o " . a> - . . ^ TS . . ._5 . • • . 

• •>,^'^ .=i2 ■ -9 sc . . .^ . . . . 

a -p-Jf-S 2^^ 8 S o o-£^2 • 0^ S o o .^ . . . . 

g 0) a> a> a> g P a> >)>5MM*=-p*^n-n-n-< mmo o ^ rPncOC? 
ai^gg^SSg^ S.S.S.S.S.S a fl^.S.SUO fl.SiS a*- a 

3=2 «^.»s =«iS^ a 3 £ 2^^^'S " » 2 2le^ « « art rt « 
0'a!;^^;^SS^wa2(s<P^Wffiffi<;<3<fefeH:ih:];^HcQHhE-i 



> 
< 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



203 



Table No. 35. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, 

from 1892 to 1912. 

[Parts per 100,000.] 



Year. 



1892, 
1893, 
1894, 
1895, 
1896. 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910, 
1911, 
1912, 



Color. 



Residue on 
Evaporation. 



c3 
C 



c3 

£ c 

a *^ 
.SCO 





.37 


.37 


' 4.70 




.61 


.53 


. ^'^ 




.69 


.58 


4.64 




.72 


.59 


1 4.90 




.49 


.45 


4.29 




.65 


.55 


4.82 _ 




.41 


.40 


4.19 




.23 


.28 


; 3.70 




.24 


.29 


: 3.80 




.24 


.29 


1 4.43 




.26 


.30 


' 3.93 




.25 


.29 


3.98 




- 


.23 


3.93 




- 


.24 


; 3.86 




- 


.24 


; 3.86 




- 


.22 


; 3.83 




- 


.19 


j 3.50 




- 


.18 


1 3.46 






.14 


3.05 




- 


.25 


4.18 




- 


.17 


3.86 





c 




o 








4^ 
















C bfl 


; 


Ot-i 


eS 


OQ 






O 


Q 


H 


"-^ 



1.67 
1.84 
1.83 
2.02 
1.67 
1.84 
1.60 
1.30 
1.20 
1.64 
1.56 
1.50 
1.59 
1.59 
1.39 
1.40 
1.35 
1.43 
1.24 
1.66 
1.23 



Ammonia. 



ALBUMINOID. 



.0007 


.0168 


.0138 


.0010 


.0174 


.0147 


.0006 


.0169 


.0150 


.0006 


.0197 


.0175 


.0005 


.0165 


.0142 


.0009 


.0193 


.0177 


.0008 


.0152 


.0136 


.0006 


.0136 


.0122 


.0012 


.0157 


.0139 


.0013 


.0158 


.0142 


.0016 


.0139 


.0119 


.0013 


.0125 


.0110 


.0023 


.0139 


.0121 


.0020 


.0145 


.0124 


.0018 


.0159 


.0134 


.0013 


.0129 


.0109 


.0011 


.0115 


.0092 


.0011 


.0128 


.0103 


.0013 


.0118 


.0102 


.0015 


.0156 


.0128 


.0018 


.0154 


.0119 



.0030 
.0027 
.0019 
.0022 
.0023 
.0016 
.0016 
.0014 
.0018 
.0016 
.0020 
.0015 
.0018 
.0021 
.0025 
.0020 
.0024 
.0025 
.0016 
.0029 
.0034 





Nitrogen 




AS i 


6 

a 

1 
O 

.41 


i 

83 

2 




.0210 


.0001 


.38 


.0143 


.0001 


.41 


.0106 


.0001 


.40 


.0171 


.0001 


.37 


.0155 


.0001 


.40 


.0137 


.0001 


.29 


.0097 


.0001 


.24 


.0137 


.0001 


.25 


.0076 


.0001 


.30 


.0173 


.0001 


.29 


.0092 


.0000 


.30 


.0142 


.0001 


.34 


.0110 


.0001 


.35 


.0083 


.0001 


.34 


.0054 


.0001 


.33 


.0068 


.0001 


.33 


.0092 


.0001 


.28 


.0034 


.0000 


.28 


.0030 


.0000 


.38 


.0029 


.0000 


.36 


.0062 


.0000 



>> 

O 



.60 
.63 
.69 
.56 
.64 
.44 
.35 
.38 
.42 
.40 
.39 
-37 
.35 
.36 
.32 
.26 
.25 
.22 
.33 
.29 



1.9 
1.8 
1.7 
0.7 
1.4 
1.6 
1.4 
1.1 
1.3 
1.7 
1.3 
1.5 
1.5 
1.4 
1.3 
1.3 
1.2 
1.3 
1.1 
1.4 
1.7 



204 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



<u 




» 




•c* 




CO 




s 




i»o 




<J 




K 




•'^ 








<^ 




■•—I 




Ci 




>~i 




O 




"»»> 




00 




o^ 




00 




■"—I 




g 




o 




^ 




*--» 




•i. 




CO 




.^ 




i^ 


f-^ 


o 


m 


^ 


C 

o 




> 


c 




^ 


O 


s; 


>, 


a 








•«s> 




i»«i 


o 


O 


■t 




3 


J- 


t-i 






(O 




^ 


>> 




o 


^w 


aj 


-s: 


^ 


■*o 




«*-, 


a 


O^ 




CO 


5- 


0!) 
(1) 


ri 


tp 


Oh 




CO 


> 


s 


<A 


o 


• • 




o 


en 


o 


t^ 


a 




•u 


g 




o 


o 


< 


2 


^ 


3 



C3 t- 



5i •= 



c>» 




«C 




5?" 


13 






CO 


-1 


ff 




C 


$. 


C3s 


TJl 



CO 



o 

CO 

d 



►^K 




































■J -r 

•< o 


, 


































u 

:5 


^ 


CO 


^» 


>o 


00 


r>. 


«5 


t>. 


05 


,^ 


00 


IC 


•^ 


t^ 


O 


«— 


c^ 


C5 


eo 


o 


o 


(M 




■* 


t^ 


CO 


o 


•n> 


L-j 


C5 


o 


o 


H K 


cs 


CO 


■^ 


t^ 




CO 


CO 




e<j 


OS 


t>. 


•^ 




C-5 


CO 


o 


H a 


L> 


















* 


















3 


































OC 


































^?i 





































c S 

H O 

;? > 



OS 

CO S9 

< K 



s • 






<t 




A 


-2 


6 


-4J 


^K 


^ 


'^ 


«^ 




s 


U,^ 







00 


»c 


C5 


s 


C5 




?o 


•f 


o 


C^I 


CO 


1— ( 


CSl 





o 
O 



r< i-i 
K O 

O P5 



3 



to •> 



s . 






< K 






«n 




o 




eo 

d 


cS 

u 
3 


;$ K 




OQ 


;Sp^ 







»-H — 1 r- <N 



^^ -H CO 



S i! 



« CO — < 



s 



C5 O — M 

O " — < — 
OS OS OS OS 



Xo. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



205 



O 

O 



^ 2" 





1 


eo 


£= 


g 


o 


eo 




•<s> 


71 


K 


O 


CS 


!^ 


Cft 


^^ 


^, 


p 


O 


> 

c3 


«,■) 


.- 


•<s> 


s 


o 


o 


o 


H 






g 

o 




•<s> 




:§ 


2 


. 


3 




t> 


1 


I' 


, 


o 


CD 


u 


CO 


73 






73 

T5 

C 
03 





c 






































g-fi § 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CS 


00 


CO 


eo 


,_( 


t^ 


•<*< 


^^ 


CO 


v^ 
















00 


00 


CVi 


cq 


00 


r^ 


r^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 




:S «> 
















eo 


TH 


T»< 


•"f 


CO 


eo 


■«»< 


T»< 


"tft 




1- n-i M 




































^ 02 




































c 




































2 ^ H " 

■:30 V 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


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CO 


"3 


eo 


eo 


«_( 


CS 


CO 


•«*< 
















r^ 


CO 


CO 





•^ 




CO 


•f 




eo 
















<N 


eo 


eo 


CO 


-^ 


CO 


CO 


eo 


■* 


•* 




0" 








, 
















'^ 












;p. OQ 


































CO 










































































































Eh 


a 




































1- 

OJ3 


1 


T— « 


<M 





1-H 


00 





^.H 


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us 


CS 


^^ 


IC 


f- 


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m 


00 


"5 


CS 


t^ 


t^ 


00 


CO 





lO 


CO 


eo 


co 


eo 




rG bO'^ 




CO 


■«*< 


<N 


T*< 


eo 


■^ 


CO 


iO 


■^ 


CO 


c:s_ 


•<n 


t^ 


OS 


CO 




|Sfe 
























•^ 












eg 02 




































C 




































^ 





C-1 


00 


eo 


t^ 


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eo 


00 





eo 


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m 




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C5 





•«*< 





00 





CO 


m 




CO 




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l^ 


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»o 




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c^ 


CO 


<M 


eo 


•o 





eo 


CO 


S 


•^ 


l>. 


o_ 


« 




eg ^ 




































a 






































e- CO 






































Z P 

a 




■^ 


C5 


t^ 


eo 


>« 


Ui 


eo 


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_ 


a> 


CS 


c?s 


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•^ 


CS 


CO 




c^ 


O' 


<M 


C5 




(M 


eo 


t^ 


»o 


CO 




00 


OS 


CO 


iO 




CO 




p a 




CO 


CO 


00 


■<»< 


«c 


■f 


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t^ 


■rfi 


CO 


00 


•»tl 


C3S 


OS 


CO 




^S 


6 
























-<' 










o 


fc, H 


































> 


a -<! 




































. K 

















































































































H 


a ,. 




































« 






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Ci 


t^ 


t>. 





00 


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eo 


CO 


1 


CO 


t^ 


,__! 


b3 


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M< 





CO 


C5 


eo 


to 


eo 




■^ 





t--. 


eo 




00 


00 


CO 







>o 





i-T 


«5 





00 


00 


OS 


o_ 





o_ 


CO 




eo_ 


00 

eo" 






►H 


































C3 






































: 2; 


■ 


































H 






































t^ 


II 




































K 




T*< 





00 


■«*< 


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tn 


^ 


^ 


CS 


eo 


OS 


r^ 





m 


„ 


^^ 





»o 





•^ 


CO 


»o 





»« 


eo 


•^ 


00 


CS 


»o 





IC 


CO 


1 





CO 


eo 


»o 


CO 


«9 


Ttl 


■V 


»c 


CO 


CO 


t>. 


CS_ 


r»< 


t» 


00 


CO 


o 






































J 


«c 


C5 


eo 


00 


i-< 





>o 


C5 


^^ 





^^ 


Oi 


CO 


00 


CO 


CO 


00 


cq 


t^ 


cq 


00 


"5 


CO 





t^ 


CS 


-^ 


t^ 


Cvl 


•^ 




00 


■^ 


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«o 


50 


10 


50 


•<i< 


CO 


CO 


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t^ 


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CO 


t^ 


t^ 


CO 


POT 


3 
02 




«— ( 




















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OQ 




































« 








































1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


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CS 





«o 


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t^ 





















00 


■^ 


t^ 


CS 


eo 


eo 




•"t" 


















t^ 


•»»< 


CS 


eo 


CO 


CS 


•-<. 


o_ 




In 

s 

CO 
























eo" 






^ 


^ 


] 




































1 








• 






• 


• 




• 




• 


• 




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• 


■< 


































a 


































>H 


_ 






. 






. 


. 




. 


. 


. 


• 




• 


a 




00 


oT 





^H 


c^r 


eo 


•««<" 


tn 


CO 


i>r 


00 


CS 





V.N 


eo" 






CS 


CS 




























r^ 




^m^ 












00 


00 


OS 


C5 


OS 


OS 


s 


OS 


CS 


CS 


OS 


2 


m 





s 





tf 



o . 

»- s 

^ c3 

1^ 
3 S 

« S 

© **-< 

£f a 

■^ u 

CD P 

« .S 

o 

CS -O 
'^ C 

a « 

u a 

IS 

m O 

cj a 



3 > 



o .-:s 
c -^ 

.So 

O o 



o Iz: 







■> 


bO 







ri 




bT 


frj 






eS 


S 


<J 


J2 




bfl 


1 


a 






a 


B 


H 


cfl 





u 


;z: 


kn 




TJ 




a 




a 



206 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 37. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Various 
Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, from 1898 to 1912, inclusive. 

[Averages of weekly determinations.] 













Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 


Southern Service Taps. 


Yeae. 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
Terminal 
Chamber. 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct. 


Effluent 

Gate-house 

No. 2. 


Low Service, 

185 Boylston 

Street. 

1 


High Service, 

1 Ashburton 

Place. 


1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910, 
1911, 
1912, 










207 
224 
248 
225 
203 
76 
• 347 
495 
231 
147 
162 
198 
216 
205 
429 


145 
104 
113 
149 
168 
120 
172 
396 
145 
246 
138 
229 

204 
450 


Ill 
217 
256 
169 
121 
96 
220 
489 
246 
118 
137 
119 
180 
151 
227 


96 
117 
188 
162 
164 
126 
176 
231 
154 
130 
136 
150 
178 
175 
249 


123 

181 
168 
246 
243 
355 
442 
261 
176 
148 
195 
213 
197 
259 


Mc 


;an, 








241 


191 


190 

1 


162 


229 



Table No. 38. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water 
Works in 1912. {Means of Weekly Determinations.) 

[Platinum Standard.] 




1 The colors given in this column represent the combined colors of the waters of the four principal 
feeders. The color of each is determined monthly, and due weight is given in combining the results 
to the sizes of the streams. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



207 



Table No. 38. — Colors of Water, etc. — Concluded. 

[Platinum Standard.] 



I 





Chestnut 


Hill 


Spot 


Fells 
Reser- 
voir. 


Northern 


Southern 




Reservo 


ir. 


' Pond. 


Service. 


Service. 






• 


^ 1 




a> 


T5T3 


r^*^JS_ 1 


C 3 


c c 


MOXTH. 




® 2 

3 O 


te- 
e No. 




3 
O 

1 "^ 


lenwoo 
Vledfor 
'ice). 


Statioi 

Stree 

(Hig 


, So 

rr> O-r 


hburto 
o s t o 
vice). 






r 

1-^ 


Si 

c 

3 


c 

-a 

1 


ffluent 

Gat 


03 u ^ 
03 O 


ap at Fire 
Hancock 
Everett 
Service). 


ap at 185 I 
Street, B 
(Low Serv 


ap at 1 As 
Place, B 
(High Ser 




)—t 


a 


S 


: B 


^ 


H 


' Eh 

1 


H 


January 


.17 




.17 


.10 


.10 


.17 


.10 


.14 


.17 


February, 








.18 


.20 


.18 


.13 


i .13 


.18 


.13 


! .17 


.18 


March, 








.20 


- 


.20 


.13 


1 .13 


.20 


.13 


.17 


.20 


April, . 








.22 


_ 


.21 


.13 


1 .13 


.21 


.13 


.19 


.21 


May, . 








.26 


_ 


.-25 


.13 


i 13 


.22 


.13 


.22 


.23 


June, . 








.23 


.23 


.22 


.12 


1 .12 


.22 


.12 


.21 


.22 


July, . 








.18 


_ 


.17 


.12 


! .12 


.17 


.11 


.17 


.17 


August, 








.14 


.18 


.14 


.12 


i .12 


.14 


.12 


.14 


.14 


September, 






.14" 


.18 


.15 


i .12 


1 .12 


.14 


.12 


.14 


.14 


October, 






.14 


.18 


.14 


; .12 


i -12 


.15 


.13 


.13 


.15 


November, 






.13 


.13 


.13 


.12 


' .12 


.13 


.12 


.13 


.13 


December, 






.11 


- 


.11 


.10 


, .09 


.14 


.11 


.12 


.13 


Mean, 








.18 


.18 


.17 


.12 


! -12 


1 .17 

1 


.12 


.16 


.17 



Table No. 39. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 
Water Works in 1912. {Means of Weekly Determinations.) 

X- 

[The temperatures are taken at the same places and times as the samples for microscopical examination; 
the depth given for each reservoir is the depth from high water mark.] 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 




208 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



T 


^.BLE Xo. 39. — Temperatures of Water, 


etc. — 


Concluded. 






'Degrees Fahrenheit.] 












Chestnut , 

Kill 
Reservoir. 


Spot Pond (Depth at 
Place of Observation 

28.0 Feet). 


Northern 
Service. 


Southern 
Service. 




c<i 






' 


-3-0 


£^--a 


CC i 


c c 




6 1 








§o 


O g bO 


2o 


Bo . 


Month. 


fHuent Gate- 
house N 


u 




S 
2 

o 


ap at Glenw 
Yard, Medf 
(Low Service). 


ap at Fire Stat 
Hancock Str 
Everett (H i 
Service). 


ap at 185 Boy Is 
Street, Boat 
(Low Service). 


Tap at 1 Ashbur 
Place, B o 8 t 
(High Service) 


' - 


X 


S 


n 


: ^ 


H 


1 H 


Jarmary 36.0 


34.4 


34.7 


35.2 


38.2 


35.6 


39.9 


41.1 


February, 






35.9 


35.5 


35.8 


36.3 


35.9 


37.3 


40.4 


41.0 


March, 






37.5 


38.5 


38.5 


38.8 


37.5 


40.3 


42.9 


43.9 


April, 






1 46.3 


45.8 


44.8 


44.9 


44.0 


45.2 


49.5 


51.5 


May, 






! 53.4 


57.8 


57.5 


57.1 


55.5 


57.6 


59.4 


60.2 


June, 






1 61.8 


' 66.5 


65.8 


64.6 


64.5 


65.9 


67.9 


68.0 


July, 






' 74.3 


73.6 


73.3 


70.6 


72.6 


72.6 


74.2 


74.4 


August, 






' 71.9 


71.9 


71.9 


71.9 


70.5 


71.0 


71.2 


72.1 


September, 






i 67.6 


68.2 


68.1 


67.9 


68.1 


67.5 


67.4 


68.5 


October, . 






58.3 


1 58.7 


58.9 


59.0 


61.6 


59.5 


61.0 


61.7 


November, 






: 48.1 


' 47.7 


48.1 


48.6 


53.5 


51.5 


52.1 


53.2 


December, 






i 40.1 


37.2 


38.4 38.0 


44.8 


40.5 


41.7 


45.5 


Mean, 






52.6 


53.0 


53.0 52.7 


53.9 


53.7 


55.6 

1 


56.8 



Table No. 40. 



Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan 
Water Works in 1912. 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 





Chestnut Hill j 


Framingham. 


( 


Clinton 






Reservoir. 












Month, 


c 


^ 




a 


a 




a 


a 






3 


3 




3 


3 




3 


3 






g 


C 


c 


a 


a 


c 


g 


a 


c 




?l 


c 


t 


§ 


c 


g 


S 


c 


s 




% 


s 


S 


s 


i 


S 


s 


s 


§ 


January, .... 


oO 


—8 


19.4 


50 


—18 


18.8 


49 


—15 


13.4 


February, 






56 


—7 


24.9 


50 


—7 


25.2 


56 


—6 


22.6 


March, 






59 


5 


34.5 


63 





34.2 


59 


—1 


31.9 


April, 






79 


24 


47.9 


76 


24 


47.7 


73 


23 


45.1 


May, 






86 


32 


58.9 


85 


31 


59.4 


81 


36 


57.8 


June, 






91 


40 


66.7 


90 


39 


67.0 


87 


39 


64.2 


July, 






99 


47 


72.1 


99 


46 


72.7 


94 


51 


70.7 


August, . 






89 


45 


67.8 


88 


40 


67.7 


83 


43 


65.2 


Seotember, 






87 


37 


62.4 


88 


35 


62.1 


86 


30 


60.6 


October, . 






82 


30 


55.0 


81 


29 


54.2 


78 


30 


53.1 


November, 






69 


19 


43.1 


68 


19 


42.9 


67 


21 


40.9 


December, 






68- 


12 


37.9 


66 11 


35.9 


62 


12 


33.3 


Average, 






- 


49.2 


- 


49.0 


- 


- 


46.6 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



209 






o 



?5J 






60 

o 

"<s> 

o 



00 
55. 






13 



eo 



^ 

<» 

-O 









o 

1^ 



"5- S 

"I 

o 

CO 
CO 



6 

m 
< 



CO CO 00 «o 
CO »0 O OS 
CO ■^ CO CO 



I 00 i 



00 1-1 I I I I I 



1-H I I I I I I 



rl I -^ I 



I O I 



I CO I I I I I 



C5 ;:; I I I I I 



Q 



a 

03 


© 


• 


3 


© 


• 


3 


o 




(1 

a 

o 


© 




ID 

a 
o 


s 


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c3 


a 


o 


T) 


s 


O 


•n 


H 


© 


.2 


.s 


2 

O 

'2 
)3 


.9 

> 


a 

m 

> 


CI 

o 

a 
a 


09 

© 


£ 
.9 

09 


c 

Oj 

© 
o 


09 

© 
> 


s 




> 


'^ 




> 


e3 


X! 


> 


13 


Xi 


> 


"rt 




s 
o 


< 


C 


5 

ca 
O 


< 


^ 
^ 


-2 

o 


> 
<3 


^ 
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-2 

05 
O 


> 

(4 



c 

c3 

© 
Q. 

"5. 



«4M 


© 


o 


Q. 


+3 
© 


a 


^ 


a 


CO 


P 






CO 


J. 


T3 


M 


a 


bO 


fft 


3 


1 


2 
^ 


3 






IH 


£ 


^ 


rs 


o 


m 




at 
© 


T3 


(< 


fl 


Q, 


03 


T3 


T) 


© 


(1) 


C 


3 



-I 

a -2 

to eo 

^ © 
© © 



O " CO 

(N i^ ^ 

05 W '3 

© © a 

"O "^ r« 

1-^ •-# CO 

_^ _? t^ 



210 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



on 



C 
^ 



o 
o 






Si, Oi 









<3 






6 





1 


^ 




• 


(M 


<M 


lA 


TJI 


CO 


■S 


05_ 


Cv| 


O 


csT 




1 


y-l 




! 




05 


■«*< 






CO 


•>* 




^ 










^» 


«o 






•<t< 


t>. 




«o 


ec 








1-H 


C4 




00 


CO 




OQ 








S 








ta 








§ 














1— 1 








z 




CO 


,^ 


M 


e 


t^ 




OQ 


1H 


»-' 




H 








Ch 








HH 






















o 












o 


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v4 


00 




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m 








^ 








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t^ 


c< 




(O 


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tH 


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CO 


1 




o 


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w 








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1 




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o 






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CO 








• 
















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0) 








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cq 


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CO 






6 


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o 






P 


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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



211 







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a 
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Revere, 2 
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e3 

o 
>> 

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^3 

3 



212 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 44. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the 
Several Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 
31, 1912, and the Number of Services and Meters installed during the Year 
1912. 



CiTT OR Town. 



Services. 



Metens. 



Fire 
Hydrants. 



Services 
Installed. 



Meters 
Installed. 



Boston, 
Somerville, 
Maiden, . 
Chelsea, . 
Everett, . 
Quincy, . 
Medford, . 
Melrose, . 
Revere, ' . 
Watertown, 
Arlington, 
Milton, 
Winthrop, 
Stoneham, 
Belmont, . 
Lexington, 
Nahant, . 
Swampscott, 
Totals, 



99,270 
12,596 
7.672 
4,682 
5,579 
8,176 
4,793 
3,699 
3,809 
2,251 
2,105 
1,587 
2,655 
1,501 
1,135 
961 
590 
1,627 



164,688 



34,565 
7,171 
7.400 
4,574 
1,891 
6,130 
4,764 
3,949 
1,605 
2,233 
1,957 
1,587 
2,586 
1,105 
1,135 
•752 
336 
1,627 



8,592 
1,158 
509 
359 
559 
925 
589 
334 
228 
347 
423 
378 
241 
144 
203 
153 
83 
153 



85,367 



15,378 



4,4671 
362 

59 
190 
121 
436 
236 

91 
189 
100 
134 

83 
102 

27 
130 

80 

35 

92 



6,934 1 



8,9622 
724 
126 
322 
332 
1,331 
224 

91 
337 
103 
421 

83 

99 
284 
127 
137 

52 



13,8472 



Includes, * 2,562 services and 2 1,540 meters acquired by the annexation of Hyde Park. 
» Includes small portion of Saugus. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



213 









CO 

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to 
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TERTO 
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ICE, M 
TREET 


























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a 




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BOSTON 

POLITAN 

WORKS 

1 ASHB 

PLA 




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WATER 
SHOP, 
TREET. 




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214 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



T3 

s=! 
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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



215 



Appendix No . 3 . 



Water Works Statistics for the Year 1912. 
The Metropolitan Water Works supply the Metropolitan Water Dis- 
trict which includes the following cities and towns : — 



City or Town. 



Popiilation, 
Census of 1910. 



Estimated 
Population, 
July 1, 1912. 



Boston 

Somerville, 

Maiden, • . 

Chelsea, 

Newton, » 

Everett 

Quincy, 

Medford 

Hyde Park 

Melrose 

Revere, 

Watertown, 

Arlington 

Milton, 

Winthrop, . 

Stoneham, 

Swampscott 

Lexington, 

Belmont, 

Nahant, 

Total population of Metropolitan Water District, 
Saugus,3 



670,585 

77,236 

44,404 

32,452 

39,806 

33,484 

32,642 

23,150 

15,507 

15,715 

18,219 

12,875 

11,187 

7,924 

10,132 

7,090 

6,204 

4,918 

5,542 

1,184 



1,070,256 
280 



718,900 
81,080 
46,840 
34,720 
41,780 
36,110 
34,640 
24,880 

-3 

16.350 

19,980 

13,700 

12,120 

8,300 

11,050 

7,600 

6,520 

5,240 

6,080 

1,320 



1,127,210 
280 



> No water supplied during the year from Metropolitan Water Works. 

» Included in Boston. 

' Only a small portion of Saugus is supplied with water. 



Mode of Supply. 
31 per cent, by gravity. 
69 per cent, by pumping. 



216 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Pumping. 
Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1 : — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company, Quintard 
Iron Works and E. P. AUis Company. 

Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Beaver Run and Sonman. Anthra- 
cite: buckwheat and screenings. Price per gTOss ton in bins: bituminous 
$4.04 to $4.05, buckwheat $2.86, screenings $3.08. Average price per gross 
ton $4.02. Per cent, ashes 10.7. 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 2: — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company. 
Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Beaver Run and Sonman. Price 

per gross ton in bins: bituminous $3.89 to $3.93. Averag-e price per gi'oss 

ton $3.91. Per cent, ashes 10.0. 

Spot Pond Station: — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Geo. F. Blake Manufacturing Company and 

Holly Manufacturing Company. 
Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Pocahontas and New River. 

Anthracite: screenings. Price per gross ton in bins: bituminous $4.39 to 

$4.76, screenings $2.50. Average price per gTOss ton $4.42. Per cent. 

ashes 10.7. 



Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations — 



No. 1. 



Engines 

No3. 

1 and 2. 



Engine 
No. 3. 



Engine 
No. 4. 



No. 2. 



Engine 
No. 12. 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons) 

Coal consumed for year (pounds), .... 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 

Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million 

gallons). 
Average dynamic head (feet), .... 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, . 

Duty on basis of plunger displacement, . 

Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot, . 



16,000,000 

1,381,720 

$5,874.72 

942.55 

133.96 

682.16 

78,490,0Q0 

36.2328 

.0465 



20,000,000 

21,735 

$102.45 

22.33 

118.09 

1,027.38 

105,700,000 

$4.5880 

.0398 



30,000,000 

4,034,529 

$17,815.30 

5,719.05 

120.93 

1,417.53 

145,660,000 

$3.1151 

.0257 



40,000,000 

4,069,092 

$16,571.32 

6,035.32 

123.61 

1,483.21 

155,820,000 

$2.7457 

0222 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



217 





Chestnut Hill 

Pumping 
Station No. 2. 


Spot Pond 
Station. 




Engines Nos. 5, 
6 and 7. 


Engines Nos. 8 
and 9. 


Daily pumping capacity (gallons), 

Coal consumed for year (pounds) 

Cost of pumping figured on pumping station expenses, 
Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million gallons). 

Average dynamic head (feet), 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal 

Duty on basis of plunger displacement, 

Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot, 


105,000,000 

6,220,263 

$34,210.17 

16,561 .43 

46.04 

2,662.50 

104,200,000 

$2.0657 

.0449 


30,000,000 

2,577.635 

$16,042.06 

2,938.92 

127.84 

1,140.16 

123,890,000 

$5.4585 

.0427 



Consumption. 

Estimated total population of the nineteen cities and towns 

supplied wholly or partially during the year 1912, , . 1,086,690 

Total consumption (gallons), pump basis, .... 42,388,000,000 

Average daily consumption (gallons), pump basis, . . 115,814,000 

Gallons per day to each inhabitant, pump basis, . . . 106.6 



Distribution. 





Owned and 
operated by 
Metropolitan 

Water 

and Sewerage 

Board. 


Total in District 

supplied 

by Metropolitan 

Water Works. 


Kinds of pipe used, 


-1 


-1 


Sizes, 


60 to 4 inch. 


60 to 4 inch. 


Extensions, less length abandoned (miles), . . . 


0.15 


74.40 


Length in use (miles), 


101.73 


1,745.90 


Stop gates added 


3 


- 


Stop gates now in use, 


456 


- 


Service pipes added, 


- 


6.319 » 


Service pipes now in use, 


- 


164.638 


Meters added 


- 


13.335* 


Meters now in uge, 


- 


85,360 


Fire hydrants added 


- 


660 


Fire hydrants now in use 


- 


15,378 



1 Cast-iron, cement-lined wrought iron and cement-lined steel pipe. 

' Cast-iron, cement-lined wrought iron, cement-lined steel and kalamine pipe. 

Includes * 2,562 services and * 1.540 meters acquired by the annexation of Hyde Park to Boston. 



21S 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No . 4. 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 



1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



731 



811 



901 



911 



941 



95 



99 



100 



2. 

WORK. 



Additions to the pumping 
plant at East Boston. 

Section 66, extension of 
North Metropolitan Sys- 
tem in Broadway, Maiden 
to Everett. 

4,250 tons of coal: — 
2,900 tons for East Boston 

pumping station. 
1,000 tons for Charlestown 

pumping station. 
350 tons for Alewife Brook 

pumping station. 

2,600 tons of coal for Deer 
Island pumping station. 

Basin at wharf at East 
Boston pumping station. 

425 tons of coal for Alewife 
Brook pumping station. 

6,600 tons of coal: — 
2,600 tons for Deer Island 

pumping station. 
3,000 tons for East Boston 

pumping station. 
1,000 tons for Charlestown 

pumping station. 

Section 67, New Mystic 
Sewer, North Metropoli- 
tan System in Medford 
and Winchester. 



Extension of screen-house at 
East Boston pumping sta- 
tion. 



Num- 
ber 
of 

Bids. 



Amount op Bid. 



Next to 
Lowest. 



$16,531 38 



J. 79 per 

ton. 
J. 86 per 

ton. 
1.60 per 

ton. 

J. 92 per 
ton. 



S4.85 per 
ton. 



S4.18 per 

ton. 
S4.03 per 

ton. 
S4.08 per 

ton. 

$104,575 00 



t,782 00 



5. 

Lowest. 



$37,000 002 
16,184 002 



$3,725 per 
ton. 2 

$3,725 per 
ton. 2 

$4.35 per 
ton. 2 

$3.92 per 
ton. 2 

$375 00 



$4.60 per 
ton. 2 



$3.98 per 

ton. 2 
$3.98 per 

ton. 2 
$3.98 per 

ton. 2 

$93,090 005 



4,700 002 



6. 

Contractor. 



AUis-Chalmers Co., 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

A. G. Tomasello, Bos- 
ton. 



New England Coal and 
Coke Co., Boston. 



Staples Coal Co., Bos- 
ton. 

Bay State Dredging 
Co., Boston. 

Locke Coal Co., Mat- 
den. 



Metropolitan Coal Co., 
Boston. 



Coleman Bros., Chel- 
sea. 



J. E. Locatelli & Co., 
Boston. 



1 Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



219 



Appendix No . 4 



THE Year 1912 — Sewerage Works. 
North Metropolitan System. 



7. 


8. 


9. 


10. 




Date of Con- 
tract. 


Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 


Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1912. 


Value of Work 

done 
Dec. 31, 1912. 




June 5, 1909 


Dec. 27, 1911 


- 


$37,000 00 


1 


July 27, 1910 


Dec. 6, 1911 


- 


23,056 44 


2 


July 5, 1911 


July 1, 1912 


- 


16,277 51 


3 


July 5, 1911 


July 1, 1912 


_ _ 


10,249 52 


4 


April 6, 1912 


April 9, 1912 


Dredging and removing material from vicinity of 
wharf at East Boston pumping station. 


375 00 


5 


June 5, 1912 


- 


$4.60 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at Ale- 
wife Brook pumping station. 


541 14 


6 


June 5, 1912 




S3. 98 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at Deer 

Island pumping station. 
$3.98 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at East 

Boston pumping station. 
$3.98 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at 

Cbarlestown pumping station. 


10,494 73 


7 


Oct. 15, 1912 




For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 54- 
inch concrete sewer and connections, $9 per lin. 
ft.; for earth or rock excavation and refilling in 
tunnel for 54-inch concrete sewer, $15 per lin. ft.; 
for Portland cement brick masonry in shafts, 
manholes and special structures, $18 per cu. yd.; 
for Portland cement concrete masonry in trench, 
$7 per cu. yd.; for Portland cement concrete in 
tunnel, $10 per cu. yd.; for rock excavation in 
trench, $3 per cu. yd. 


15,038 50 


8 


Dec. 26, 1912 




Extension of screen-house at East Boston pumping 
station. 


_ 


9 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



220 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts riade and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 





1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 


2. 

WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber 
of 
Bids. 


Amount of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 

2 
3 

4 


911 

921 
97 

98 


2,350 tons of coal: — 

1,900 tons for Ward Street 

pumping station. 
450 tons for Nut Island 

screen-house. 

375 tons of coal for Quincy 
pumping station. 

2,700 tons of coal: — 
2,200 tons for Ward Street 

pumping station. 
500 tons for Nut Island 

screen-house. 

475 tons of coal for Quincy 
pumping station. 


4 
3 

3 

3 

2 

2 


83.95 per 

ton. 
84.03 per 

ton. 

84.75 per 
ton. 

84.40 per 

ton. 
84.37 per 

ton. 

84.74 per 
ton. 


83.92 per 
ton. 2 

84.02 per 
ton. 2 

84.45 per 
ton. 2 

$4.31 per 
ton. 2 

84.12 per 
ton. 2 

84.65 per 
ton. 2 


Staples Coal Co., Bos- 
ton. 

Neponset Coal Co., 
Dorchester. 

Metropolitan Coal 
Co., Boston. 

City Fuel Co., Boston. 



1 Contract completed. 



Xo. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



221 



THE Year 1912 — Sewerage Works — Continued. 
South Metropolitan System. 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1912. 



10. 

Value of Work 

done 
Dec. 31, 1912. 



July 5, 1911 



July 5, 1911 



June 5, 1912 



June 5, 1912 



July 1, 1912 



July 1, 1912 



$4.31 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at Ward 

Street pumping station. 
$4.12 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered on wharf at Nut 

Island screen-house. 



$4.65 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at Quincy 
. pumping station. 



$10,357 04 

1,977 31 
5,112 56 

539 29 



* Contract based upon this bid. 



222 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1912 

— Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts. 



Sewerage Works 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1912. 



North Metropolitan System, 9 contracts, 

South Metropolitan System, 4 contracts, 

Total of 13 contracts made and pending during the year 1912, 



$113,032 84 
17,986 20 



$131,019 04 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



223 



Appendix No . 5 . 



Metropolitan Sewerage Works. 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

Table No. 1. — Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers with Public and Special 

Connections. 









kh . 


Special Connections. 






§ 


^sS 




.2d 


City or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 


_d 


6^1 

»1-4 


Character or Location of 


o 

O c3 






.*A 

^ 
3 




Connection. 


n 

so 






Ph 




^ 


Boston: — 












Deer Island, 


6' 3" to 9', . . . . 


1.367 


4 


— _ 


_ 


East Boston, 


9' to 1' 


5.467 


24 


Shoe factory 

Navy Yard 


1 
8 


Charlestown, 


6' 7"X7' 5" to 1', 


3.292 


14 


Almshouse, .... 

Private Building, . 

Club House 


1 

1 
1 


Winthrop, 


9' 


2.864 


12] 

> 


Fire Dept. Station, 
Private Building, . 
Bakery, 


1 
1 

1 








Rendering works, . 


1 


Chelsea, . 


8' 4"X9' 2" to 1' 10"X2' 4", 


5.123 


10 


Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, .... 

Chelsea Water Works blow- 
off, 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, .... 

Cameron Appliance Co., 


1 

2 

1 
1 


Everett, . 


8'2"X8'10"to4'8"X5'l", 


2.925 


6 


Shultz-Goodwin Co., 
Andrews- Wasgatt Co., . 
National Metallic Bed Co., . 
Linoide Co., .... 
Metropolitan Water Works 


1 

1 
1 

1 


Maiden, . 


4' 6"X4' 10" to 1', 


5.8441 


31 

• 


blow-off, . 
Private buildings, . 
Private buildings, . 


1 
164 
111 


Melrose, , 


4' 6"X4' 10" to 10", . 


6.0992 


36 


Factory, 

Railroad station, . 
Slaughter house, 


1 
1 
1 


Cambridge, , 


5' 2"X5' 9" to 1' 3", . 


7.167 


38 


City Hospital, 

Street Railway Machine Shop, 
Tannery, .... 
Slaughter-houses (3), 


2 
1 








1 










Car-house, .... 


1 


Somerville, 


6'5"X7'2"tol'10"X2'3", 


3.471 


10. 


Somerville Water Works blow- 
off, . 

Street railway power house, , 

Stable, 

Rendering works, . 
Armory building, . 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


Medford, 


4'8"X5'l"to 10", . 


5.359 


22 


Private buildings, . 

Stable, 

Police sub-.station, 


8 

1 
1 



1 Includes 1.84 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden. 

2 Includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Melrose. 



224 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table Xo. 1. — Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers with Public and Special 

Connections — Concluded. 







.2 


c «S2 


Special Connections. 








City or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 


j3 


Con 
3, Dec 
31, 19 


Character or Location of 


c ^ 







C 
3 


Public 
tion. 
ber. 


Connections. 


~ 4) 

1= 










Tannery, .... 


4 










Private buildings, . 


3 


Winchester, . 


4' 6" to r 3", . 


6.518 


14] 


Gelatine factory, , 

Stable 

Railroad station, . 


1 
1 
1 


Stoneham, 


1' 3" to 10", 


0.010 


4 


_ _ 


- 


Woburn, 


1' 10"X2' 4" to 1' 3", . 


0.933 


3 


Glue factory 

Private buildings, . 


1 
136 


Arlington, 


1' 6" to 10", 


3.5201 


37] 


Railroad station, . 
Car-house, .... 
Post Office 


1 
3 
1 


Belmont, 2 


_ _ 


_ 


3 


_ _ 


- 


Wakefield, 2 . 


- - 


_ 


1 


_ - 


- 


Revere, . 


4' to 3' 


0.048 


2 




- 




60.0073 


271 


477 



1 Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 
* The Metropolitan sewer extends but a few feet into the towns of Belmont and Wakefield. 
' Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic valley sewer in Medford, Winchester and Woburn, running parallel with 
the Metropolitan sewer. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



225 



Table No. 2. 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers with Public and Special 
Connections. 




1 Includes .355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

2 Includes .446 of a mile of pipe and concrete sewers built for the use of the city of Boston; also, .026 
of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

3 Includes L24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

* Includes .158 of a mile of pipe sewer built for the use of the town of Brookline. 
5 Includes .025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 



226 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 





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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



227 





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228 ^METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No . 6 . 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT PRESENTED TO THE GENERAL COURT 

ON JANUARY 8, 1913. 

The ^Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board respectfully presents 
the following abstract of the account of its doings, receipts, expendi- 
tures, disbursements, assets and liabilities for the year ending November 
30, 1912, in accordance ^ith the pro\dsions of chapter 235 of the Acts 
of the year 1906- 

jMetropolitan Water Works. 
Construction. 

The loans authorized for expenditures under the Metropolitan Water 
acts, the receipts which are added to the loan fund, the expenditures 
for the construction and acquisition of works, and the balance available 
on December 1, 1912, have been as follows: — 

Loans authorized under Metropolitan Water acts, . . . 842,690,000 00 
Receipt from town of Swampscott for admission to Metropolitan 

Water District, paid into Loan Fund (St. 1909, c. 320), . . 90,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of property which are placed to the credit 
of the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1912, . $20,382 62 
For the period prior to December 1, 1911, . 200,453 52 

220,836 14 



$43,000,836 14 
Amount approved for payment by the Board out of the Metro- 
poUtan Water Loan Fund : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1912, . S104,894 17 
For the period prior to December 1, 1911, . 41,925,028 48 

42,029,922 65 



Balance December 1, 1912, $970,913 49 

The amount of the Metropolitan Water Loan bonds issued and 
outstanding at the beginning of the fiscal year was $41,738,000. At 
the end of the year the amount of the bonds issued was $41,788,000. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 229 

The Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund amounted at the beginning 
of the year to $8,927,838.95, and at the end of the year to $9,811,181.29. 
The net decrease in the debt for the MetropoKtan Water** Works was 
$833,342.34. 

Maintenance. 

Amount appropriated for the maintenance and oper- 
ation of works, for the year ending November 30, 
1912, $426,000 00 

Balance of special appropriation for the improve- 
ment of the Cochituate watershed (1909-1911) 
remaining, 1,441 98 

Special appropriation for protection of water supply 

(1911), 15,000 00 

Receipts credited to this fund for year ending Novem- 
ber 30, 1912, 86,691 67 

$529,133 65 

Amount approved by Board for maintenance and op- 
eration of works during year ending November 30, 
1912, 451,529 16 



Balance December 1, 1912, $77,604 49 

This balance includes the sum of $1,117.12 appropriated for the im- 
provement of the Cochituate watershed which remains to be expended 
for the completion of the work. There are also included in the balance 
the sum of $14,921.21, the amount remaining unexpended of the special 
appropriation for the protection of the water supply in Newton, and 
the sum of $20,000, the special appropriation in 1912 for the protec- 
tion and improvement of the water supply especially in the town of 
Framingham. 

The Board has also received during the year ending November 30, 
1912, $95,835.44 from rentals, the sale of land, land products and 
power and from other proceeds from the operations of the Board which 
according to section 18 of the Metropolitan Water Act are applied by 
the Treasurer of the Commonwealth to the payment of interest on the 
Metropolitan Water Loan, to sinking fund requirements, and expenses 
of maintenance and operation of works, in reduction of the amount to 
be assessed upon the Metropolitan Water District for the year. 

Sums received from sales of water to municipalities not belonging 
to the District and to water companies, and from municipalities for 
admission to the District, have been applied as follows: — 



230 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

For the period prior to December 1, 1906, distributed to the cities 
and towns of the District, as provided by section 3 of the Metro- 
poUtan Water Act, $219,865 65 

For the period beginning December 1, 1906, and prior to December 
1, 1911, applied to the Metropohtan Water Loan Sinking Fund, 
as provided by chapter 238 of the Acts of 1907, .... 26,787 09 

For the year beginning December 1, 1911, and ending November 
30, 1912, apphed to the Metropohtan Water Loan Sinking Fund, 
as provided by said last-named act, 14,814 54 



$261,467 28 



Metropolitan Sewerage Works. 

Construction. 

The loans authorized under the various acts of the Legislature for 
the construction of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, the receipts 
which are added to the proceeds of the loans, and the expenditures for 
construction, are given below, as follows : — 

North Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized for expenditures for construction 
under the various acts, including those for the 
Revere, Belmont and Maiden extensions. North 
System enlargements and extensions, and New 
Mystic Sewer, . . . . . . . .$7,013,865 73 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscel- 
laneous sources, which are placed to the credit 
of the North Metropohtan System : -^ 

For the year ending November 30, 1912, 10,623 60 

For the period prior to December 1, 1911, . 64,560 64 
Amount approved for payment by the Board ^ out 
of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, North' 
System : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1912, . $46,595 23 

For the period prior to December 1, 1911, . 6,679,862 22 



$7,089,049 97 $6,726,457 45 
Balance December 1, 1912, $362,592 52 

1 T he word " Board " refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and its successor the Metropol- 
itan Water and Sewerage Board. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 231 



South Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized for expenditures for construc- 
tion under the various acts, apphed to the con- 
struction of the Charles River valley sewer, 
Neponset valley sewer. High-level sewer and 
extension, . . . . . . $8,867,046 27 

Receipts for pumping, sales of real estate and from 
miscellaneous sources, which are placed to the 
credit of the South Metropolitan System : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1912, . 372 09 

For the period prior to December 1, 1911, 13,632 51 

Amount approved by the Board for payment as 
follows : — 
On account of the Charles River valley sewer, $800,046 27 

On account of the Neponset valley sewer, , 911,531 46 

On account of the High-level sewer and ex- 
tension : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1912, 7,504 29 

For the period prior to December 1, 1911, 7,101,407 03 



$8,881,050 87 $8,820,489 05 
Balance December 1, 1912, $60,561 82 

The amount of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan bonds issued and 
outstanding at the beginning of the fiscal year was $15,502,912, and at 
the end of the year the amount so issued and outstanding was the 
same. Of the total amount outstanding at the end of the year, 
$6,625,000 was issued for the North Metropolitan System, and 
$8,877,912 for the South Metropolitan System. The amount of the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Sinking Fund was at the beginning of the 
fiscal year $2,180,653.98, and at the end of the year was $2,454,189.72, 
of which $1,572,485.73 was on account of the North Metropolitan 
System, and $881,703.99 was on account of the South Metropolitan 
System. The net decrease in the debt for the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Works was $273,535.74. 



232 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Maintenance. 
North Metropolitan System. 
Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1912, . $160,500 00 

Receipts from pumping and from other sources, which are returned 
to the appropriation : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1912, 674 27 



$161,174 27 



Amount approved for payment by the Board : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1912, 156,845 07 



Balance December 1, 1912, . $4,329 20 

South Metropolitan System. 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1912, . $107,550 00 
Receipts from sales of property and for pumping, which are re- 
turned to the appropriation : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1912, 383 99 



$107,933 99 
Amount approved for payment by the Board : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1912, 103,716 97 



Balance December 1, 1912, $4,217 02 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 233 



Appen dix No. 7. 



Legislatiox of the Year 1912 affecting the Metro- 
politan Water and Sewerage Board. 



Acts of 1912. 
Chapter 132. 

An Act making an appropriation for operating the 

north metropolitan system of sewage DISPOSAL; 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. A sum not exceedina; one hundred and sixty Appropriation 

'-' •' for maintenance 

thousand five hundred dollars is hereby appropriated, to be of north met- 

'J r r r j ropohtan sew- 

paid out of the North Metropolitan System Maintenance erage works. 
Fund, for the maintenance and operation of a system of sew- 
age disposal for the cities included in what is known as the 
north metropolitan system, during the fiscal year ending on 
the thirtieth day of JSTovember, nineteen hundred and twelve. 
Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved February 20, 19-12. 



Chapter 133. 

An Act making an appropriation for operating the 
metropolitan water system. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding four hundred and twenty- Appropriation 
six thousand dollars is hereby appropriated, to be paid out of oTiSltropXtrn 
the MetropoHtan Water Maintenance Fund, for the mainte- ^^^^'^ ^'°''^'- 
nance and operation of the metropolitan water system for the 
cities and towns in what is known as the metropolitan water 
district, during the fiscal year ending on the thirtieth day of 
November, nineteen hundred and twelve. 

Section 2. This act shall take eft'ect upon its passage. 
[Approved February 20, 1912. 



234 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Appropriation 
for maintenance 
of south met- 
ropolitan sew- 
erage works. 



Chapter 146. 

An Act making an appropriation for operating the 

SOUTH metropolitan SYSTEM OF SEWAGE DISPOSAL. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding one hundred seven thou- 
sand five hundred and fifty dollars is hereby appropriated, 
to be paid out of the South Metropolitan System Maintenance 
Fund, for the cost of maintenance and operation of the south 
metropolitan system of sewage disposal, comprising a part 
of Boston, the cities of Newton and Waltham, and the towns 
of Brookline. Water town, Dedham and Milton, during the 
fiscal year ending on the thirtieth day of November, nineteen 
hundred and twelve. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved Fehruary 28, 1912. 



Improvements 
in the north 
metropolitan 
sewerage 
system. 



Metropolitan 
Sewerage Loan. 



Chapter 461. 

An Act to provide for certain improvements in the 

NORTH metropolitan SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board 
is hereby authorized to provide and construct, as a part of 
the north metropolitan sewerage system, the following works : 
— An additional main sewer in the Mystic valley extending 
from a point in the old Mystic valley sewer near the bound- 
ary line between the city of Woburn and the town of Win- 
chester and running through the town of Winchester and a 
part of the city of Medford to a point in the new metropolitan 
main sewer near its junction with the Mystic valley main 
sewer; and new screening machinery in connection with the 
East Boston sewerage pumping station, with such additional 
land as may be necessary in connection with the installation 
of such machinery; and for these purposes the sum of three 
hundred and seventy-eight thousand dollars shall be allowed 
and paid out of the treasury of the commonwealth from the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, North System. 

Section 2. For the purposes named in the preceding sec- 
tion the said board may, in addition to providing for works 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 235 

for which expenditures have hitherto been authorized, expend 
any sum heretofore appropriated for the construction of the 
metropolitan sewerage works, north system. To meet the 
further expenditures incurred under the provisions of this 
act and not so provided for, the treasurer and receiver general 
shall, from time to time, issue in the name and behalf of the 
commonwealth and under its seal bonds designated on the face 
thereof. Metropolitan Sewerage Loan, to an amount not ex- 
ceeding three hundred and seventy-eight thousand dollars, 
in addition to the amount of such bonds heretofore author- 
ized for the construction of the north metropolitan sewerage 
works. 

Sections" 3. The provisions of chapter four hundred and ^^"^^jjjij °^ 
thirty-nine of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and eighty- ^pp'y- 
nine and of all acts in amendment thereof and in addition 
thereto shall, so far as they may be applicable, apply to the 
indebtedness and all proceedings authorized by this act. 

Section 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 10, 1912. 



Chapter 528. 

An Act to provide a Saturday half holiday for laborers 
and mechanics of the metropolitan water and 
sewerage board and the metropolitan park commis- 
SION. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Laborers and mechanics in the permanent serv- J'^^f J°]^5f ® ^ 
ice of the- metropolitan water and sewerage board of the met- fof certain 
ropolitan park commission, except those employed in the 
pumping stations of the metropolitan water and sewerage 
board and at the bath-houses under the control of the metro- 
politan park commission, shall be given a half holiday each 
week during the months of June, July, August and Septem- 
ber, without loss of pay, and, if practicable, the half holiday 
shall be on Saturday. If, however, the public service so re- 
quires, the metropolitan park commission and the metropoli- 
tan water and sewerage board may at any time during the 
year give to the laborers and mechanics in their permanent 
service, in lieu of the said half holidays, days off duty without 



236 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

loss of pay equivalent in time to the half holidays which 
would otherwise be given under this act. 

Sectioj^ 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

(The foregoing was laid before the Governor on the seven- 
teenth day of April, 1912, and after five days it had " the 
force of a law " , as prescribed by the Constitution, as it was 
not returned by him with his objections thereto within that 
time,) 



The town of 
Framingham 
may enlarge, 
etc., its 
system of 
water supply. 



Chapter 656. 

An Act to authorize the town of framingham to en- 
large AND IMPROVE ITS SYSTEM OF WATER SUPPLY. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The town of Framingham, acting b}^ its water 
commissioners, may enlarge and improve its system of water 
supply, and for that purpose may erect a pumping station 
and other necessary structures, lay pipes, aqueducts, conduits 
and other water courses, and may construct driven, artesian 
and other wells upon land in said town to be acquired there- 
for; and also may take, or acquire by purchase or otherwise, 
and hold any land, .rights of way, and easements necessary 
for the purposes aforesaid, or for preserving the purity of the 
water. The town may also connect said system, as enlarged 
and improved, with the waters of reservoir number three of 
the metropolitan water works, the waters of Sudbury river 
or Farm pond and the waters which flow into and from said 
river and pond, or any reservoir constructed on said river, 
pond or waters situated in said town, and for the purpose of 
such connection may lay, construct and maintain pipes, aque- 
ducts, conduits, driven, artesian or other wells, and other 
water courses in, upon and through land of the commonwealth 
to and into said reservoir number three or river, pond or 
waters or reservoirs, as aforesaid, and may distribute there- 
from throughout said town sufficient water for the use of the 
town and its inhabitants for the extinguishment of fires and 
for domestic and other purposes. The point of connection 
with, and entrance into, said reservoir or river, pond and 
waters or reservoirs as aforesaid, and the location of any pipes, 
aqueducts, conduits, wells, or other water courses laid or con- 
structed on land of the commonwealth, shall be determined 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 237 

by agreement between the town and the metropolitan water 
and sewerage board. 

Section 2. For the purposes aforesaid the town is author- May take lands, 
ized to take, or to acquire by purchase or otherwise, any neces- etc. 
sary land, rights of way, or other easements, to lay, construct 
and maintain any necessary pipes, aqueducts, conduits, reser- 
voirs and other structures for holding, conveying, and dis- 
tributing the water, or for preserving the purity thereof. The 
town may construct and lay pipes, aqueducts, conduits, arte- 
sian or other wells and any other water works under and over 
any land, including land of the commonwealth, as hereinbe- 
fore provided, water courses, railroads, railways or other 
public or private ways, in such manner as not unnecessarily 
to obstruct the same, and may do any other thing necessary 
or proper in executing the purposes of this act; but the town 
shall not enter upon, construct or lay any conduits, pipes or 
other works within the location of any railroad corporation 
except at such times and in such manner as it may agree upon 
with such corporation, or, in case of failure so to agree, as 
may be approved by the board of railroad commissioners. 

Section 3. The town shall, within sixty days after the Taking to be 
taking of any lands, rights of way, water rights, water sources 
or easements as aforesaid, file and cause to be recorded in the 
registry of deeds for the county and district within which the 
same are situated a description thereof sufiiciently accurate 
for identification, with a statement of the purpose for which 
the same were taken, signed by the water commissioners of 
the town. 

Section" 4. The town shall pay all damages sustained by Payment of 
any person or corporation by the taking of any land, rights 
of way, water, water sources, water rights or easements or by 
any other thing taken or done by authority of this act. Any 
person or corporation sustaining such damages and failing 
to agree with the town as to the amount thereof may have the 
damages determined in the manner provided by law in the 
case of land taken for the laying out of highways, on applica- 
tion at any time within a period of two years after the taking 
of such land or other property or the doing of other injury 
under the authority of this act. For all damages caused to 
the commonwealth or the metropolitan water and sewerage 
board by the taking of water from said reservoir, or river, 
pond, and waters or reservoirs as aforesaid by the town under 



damages, etc. 



238 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Existing rights 
not affected. 



Time of taking 
effect. 



the provisions of this act, the town shall pay to the common- 
wealth such sum, rate, damages, or compensation as may be 
agreed upon by the town through its water commissioners 
and the metropolitan water and sewerage board, and for all 
damages caused to the commonwealth or the metropolitan 
water and sewerage board by the exercise by the town of the 
rights and privileges herein granted to the town in lands of 
the commonwealth, the town shall also pay such sum as may 
be agreed upon as aforesaid, but in case the town and said 
board are unable to agree upon the amount of such sum, rate, 
damage or compensation, the matter shall be submitted to 
three commissioners to be appointed by the supreme judicial 
court upon application of either party and notice to the other, 
whose decision and award when accepted by the court shall 
be binding upon both parties. 

Sectiojt 7. Nothing in this act shall be construed to affect 
any existing right, power or privilege of said town to take 
water from any lake, stream, well, pond, brook, reservoir or 
other source of water supply, or to abridge any rights, powers 
or privileges heretofore reserved or granted to the town in 
respect to its water supply; and the rights, powers and priv- 
ileges granted to the town by this act shall be held to be in 
addition to all rights, powers and privileges heretofore granted 
or reserved to the town. 

Section" 8. This act shall take effect upon its acceptance 
by a majority of the voters of the town present and voting 
thereon at a meeting duly called for the purpose. [Approved 
May 21, 1912, 



Determining 
damages to 
Stoneham by 
reason of the 
taking of Spot 
pond, etc. 



Chapter 689. 

An Act to provide foe determining the damages to be 

PAID to the town of STONEHAM BY REASON OF THE 
TAKING OF SPOT POND FOR THE METROPOLITAN WATER 
WORKS. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Within one year after the passage of this act 
the town of Stoneham may file in the clerk's office of the su- 
perior court for the county of Middlesex a petition for the 
determination of the damages sustained by it by reason of 
any taking or act of the metropolitan water board or of the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 239 

metropolitan water and sewerage board under authority of 
chapter four hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and ninety-five, and acts in amendment 
thereof and in addition thereto, and thereupon, after such 
notice as said court shall order, the court shall appoint a 
commission of three disinterested persons. The commission 
shall, after notice and hearing, determine the damages spec- 
ified in the petition which the town sustained as aforesaid 
and could have recovered upon a petition filed in accordance 
with the provisions of section thirteen of said chapter four 
hundred and eighty-eight, and shall report its determination 
to the court. The determination, when accepted by the court, 
shall be final and conclusive, and the town shall thereupon 
be precluded from bringing any further action to recover for 
any damages caused as aforesaid. The court may allow the 
members of said commission reasonable compensation for 
their services, and the compensation so allowed and the dam- 
ages, if any, determined as aforesaid shall be paid from the 
treasur}^ of the commonwealth, and thereafter shall be appor- 
tioned and paid in the same manner in which the other 
expenses of the metropolitan water and sewerage board are 
apportioned and paid. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 29, 1912. 



Chapter 694. 

An Act relative to the taking of property of the city 
of boston by the metropolitan water and sewerage 

BOARD. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board Jfate^andse^^ 
may take, or acquire by purchase or otherwise, the Fisher ^i^^taS^^ 
Hill reservoir, so called, and the land surrounding the same fesfrvok.'etc. 
and the main water supply pipes belonging to the city of 
Boston located in the town of Brookline and the city of Somer- 
ville, and in Beacon street, Chestnut Hill avenue and land in 
the Brighton district of the city of Boston. 

Section 2. To meet the expenditures incurred under the Metropolitan 
provisions of this act the treasurer and receiver general shall, ^^^"^ ^°'^''' 
from time to time, issue, upon the request of said board, bonds 



240 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

in the name and behalf of the commonwealth, to be designated 
on the face thereof, Metropolitan Water Loan, to an amount 
not exceeding six hundred thousand dollars, in addition to the 
sum of forty-two million and ninety thousand dollars author- 
ized to be issued by chapter four hundred and eighty-eight 
of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-five and 
acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto, and the 
provisions of said chapter four hundred and eighty-eight and 
of acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto shall 
apply to this additional loan. 

Sectiox 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 29, 1912. 



Commission on 
economy and 
efficiency^ -j 
established. 



Chapter 719. 

An Act to establish a commisstox on economy and effi- 
ciency FOR the commonwealth. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The governor, with the advice and consent of 
the council, shall appoint a commission on economy and effi- 
ciency for the commonwealth, to consist of three persons, 
qualified voters of the commonwealth, one of whom shall be 
the auditor of the commonwealth. The chairman shall be 
designated by the governor, shall be appointed for the term of 
two years from January first, nineteen hundred and twelve, 
and shall receive a salary at the rate of five thousand dollars 
per annum. The chairman shall give his whole time to the 
work of the commission. The other member shall be ap- 
pointed for a term of one year from January first, nineteen 
hundred and twelve, and shall receive a salary at the rate of 
thirt3^-five hundred dollars per annum. Annually thereafter 
the governor, with the advice and consent of the council, shall 
appoint one member to serve for two years. Any vacancy 
shall be filled by the governor, with the advice and consent 
of the council, for the unexpired term, and at the expiration 
or other determination of the term of the person designated 
as chairman the governor shall designate a person to serve as 
chairman. In all cases a member shall continue to serve until 
his successor is appointed and qualified. The members of said 
commission may be removed by the governor, with the advice 
and consent of the council. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 241 

Section 2. Said commission may employ a secretary and Secretary, etc. 
such experts, clerks and other assistants, and may pay them 
such salaries, and may incur such other expenses as it may 
deem necessary and proper, not exceeding the sum of ten 
thousand dollars in the year nineteen hundred and twelve, 
and not exceeding thereafter such sum as may be appropriated 
for that purpose by the general court. All appointments 
under this section shall be in accordance with the rules of the 
civil service commission. 

Section 3. Every officer or board having charge of any Estimates to be 
department, institution or undertaking which receives an an- the auditor of 
nual appropriation of money from the treasury of the com- wealth, etc. 
monwealth, including annual appropriations to be met by 
assessments, shall, annually, on or before the fifteenth day 
of November, submit to the auditor of the commonwealth, 
statements showing in detail the amounts appropriated for the 
current fiscal year, estimates of the amounts required for the 
ensuing fiscal year, with an explanation of the reason for any 
increased appropriation, and with citations of the statutes 
relating thereto, and the expenditures for the current year 
and for each of the two years next preceding. The said esti- 
mates shall not include any estimates for special purposes or 
objects. The auditor, on or before the fifteenth day of Decem- 
ber in each year, shall submit to the governor elect and to the 
commission on economy and efficiency copies of the amounts 
so required by such departments, institutions or undertakings, 
together with a statement of the general appropriations for 
said departments, institutions or undertakings of the preced- 
ing fiscal year and the expenditures for the same and the un- 
expended balance as of the preceding thirtieth of November. 
The auditor shall further embody the statements received 
from those in charge of such departments, institutions or 
undertakings, together with his estimates for the ensuing 
fiscal year for the ordinary and other revenue of the common- 
wealth, in one document, and shall have the document printed 
and shall transmit the same to the general court for its action 
on or before the first Thursday of January of each year. 
Copies of this document shall be distributed to the members 
of tlie general court. 

Section 4. Officers, heads of departments, boards, com- Estimates for 
missions and trustees of institutions, who, in their annual ^S^lpeSS^^^^ 
reports, or otherwise, recommend appropriations from the fubSStSd^to^ 

the auditor, etc. 



242 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Examination of 
estimates, 
report, etc. 



Special exam- 
inations to be 
made, etc. 



Inquiry to be 
made into the 
laws governing 
financial trans- 
actions, etc. 



state treasury for special purposes or objects, including appro- 
priations to be met by assessments, in addition to the ordinary 
running expenses, shall submit estimates thereof in detail to 
the auditor of the commonwealth on or before the fifteenth 
day of November in each year, and he shall classify and sub- 
mit them to the governor elect and to the commission on 
economy and efficiency for their examination on or before the 
fifteenth day of December next succeeding, and shall have 
them printed in a public document, and shall transmit the 
same to the general court on or before the first Thursday of 
January of each year for its action. 

SECTioisr 5. The commission on economy and efficiency 
shall examine the statements submitted to it by the auditor, 
showing the general and special appropriations asked for by 
those in charge of the various departments, institutions, 
boards and undertakings mentioned in sections three and four, 
and shall report thereon to the general court annually on or 
before the first Thursday in January, and at such other times 
as it may see fit, together with such facts, suggestions or 
recommendations as to any or all of the appropriations re- 
quested or the method of raising money for the same as it may 
deem expedient. 

Section 6. On request of either branch of the general 
court or of the ways and means committee of either branch, 
or of the governor, or of the committee on finance of the gov- 
ernor's council, the commission shall make a special examina- 
tion of any matter afl^ecting the management or finances of 
any department, institution, board, undertaking or commis- 
sion mentioned in section three, and on request shall give any 
information in its possession to either branch of the general 
court or to the ways and means committee of either branch 
or to the governor. 

Section 7. The commission may make a special examina- 
tion of the management or finances of any of the departments, 
institutions, boards, undertakings, or commissions mentioned 
in section three and may report thereon from time to time to 
the governor and council and to the general court, if it is in 
session. 

SECTioisr 8. It shall be the duty of the commission to inquire 
into the laws governing the financial transactions of the com- 
monwealth and to study into the possibility of promoting 
greater economy and efficiency and utility in the transaction 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 243 

of the business of the commonwealth by any changes in such 
laws, by the reorganization, consolidation or co-ordination of 
departments and institutions, by different methods of admin- 
istration, by classification of employees, by fixing maximum 
and minimum salaries, by standardizing vacations, by organ- 
izing a central purchasing agency or department, by the sub- 
stitution of the budget method of appropriating money or 
by any other means, and it shall report thereon from time to 
time to the governor and council and to the general court, if 
it is in session. 

Section 9. For the purpose of this act and in order to pro- powers of the 
vide information which shall serve as a basis for legislation, ^J™°^^^^^°°' 
the commission shall have the power to require the attendance 
and testimony of witnesses and the production of all books, 
papers, contracts and documents relating to any matter 
within the scope of any investigation authorized by this act. 
Witnesses shall be summoned in the same manner and shall 
be paid the same fees as witnesses before the superior court. 
The chairman of the commission or any member thereof may 
administer oaths to, or take the afiirmation of, witnesses and 
may prescribe rules and regulations for the conduct of hear- 
ings and the giving of testimony. If any person so summoned 
and paid shall refuse to attend, or to be sworn or to affirm, 
or to answer any question, or to produce any book, contract, 
document or paper pertinent to the matter of inquiry in con- 
sideration before the commission, a justice of the supreme judi- 
cial court or of the superior court, in his discretion, upon 
application by the commission or any member thereof author- 
ized thereto by vote of the commission, may issue an order 
requiring such person to appear before the commission, and 
to produce his books, contracts, documents and papers and to 
give evidence touching the matter in question, and failure 
to obey such order of the court may be punished by such court 
as a contempt thereof. Any person summoned and paid who 
shall refuse to attend, or to be sworn or to affirm, or to 
answer any question, or to produce any book, contract, docu- 
ment or paper pertinent to the matter in consideration by the 
commission, and any person who wilfully interrupts or dis- 
turbs any hearing of the commission, or who is disorderly 
thereat, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding fifty dollars, 
or by imprisonment for not more than thirty days, or by both 
such fine and imprisonment. Any person who wilfully swears 



244 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Commission to 
report to gov- 
ernor, etc. 



Repeal. 



or affirms falsely before the commission upon any point ma- 
terial to the matter of inquiry shall be guilty of perjury, and 
shall be subject to the provisions of sections one to five, both 
inclusive, of chapter two hundred and ten of the Revised 
Laws and amendments thereof. Upon application by the 
commission to any justice of the supreme judicial court, or 
of the superior court, the justice may issue a commission to 
one or more competent persons in another state for the ex- 
amination of a person without this commonwealth relative 
to any matter within the scope of any investigation author- 
ized by this act. The testimony of such person may be taken 
by open commission or otherwise under the procedure, so far 
as the same may be applicable, provided for by section forty- 
three of chapter one hundred and seventy-five of the Revised 
Laws, and the said justice may issue letters rogatory in sup- 
port of said commission. I^othing in this act shall be con- 
strued to compel any person to give any testimony or to pro- 
duce any evidence, documentary or otherwise, which may tend 
to incriminate him. 

Section 10. The commission shall make a report to the 
governor and council and to ^ the general court in January of 
each year, showing the work done by it during the preceding 
year, together with such facts, suggestions or recommenda- 
tions as to the finances or management of any or all of the 
departments, institutions, boards, undertakings or commis- 
sions of the commonwealth, as it may see fit, and shall report 
on or before the first Thursday in January, nineteen hundred 
and thirteen, what changes if any in the laws it deems advisa- 
ble in relation to its existence, organization, powers or duties. 
Any suggestions for legislation shall be accompanied with 
drafts of the bills recommended. 

Section 11. Chapter two hundred and twenty of the acts 
of the year nineteen hundred and ten and all acts and parts 
of acts inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed. 

Section 12. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved June 6, 1912. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 245 



Chapter 10. 

Resolve to provide foe an investigation of the condi- 
tion OF spot pond brook in STONEHAM, MELROSE AND 
MALDEN. 

Resolved, That the governor, with the advice and consent -^v^g^gate^ *° 
of the council, shall appoint one person and the mayor of the s^of PoSd^ 
city of Maiden, the mayor of the city of Melrose and the ^^^°^- 
selectmen of the town of Stoneham shall each appoint one 
person, and the fonr persons so appointed shall constitute a 
commission to be known as the Spot Pond Brook Commission. 
Said commission shall investigate the condition of Spot Pond 
brook in Stoneham, Melrose and Maiden and report to the 
general court before the tenth day of January, nineteen hun- 
dred and thirteen, a plan for such improvements in said 
brook, by means of a retaining basin or otherwise, as will pre- 
, vent flooding along the course of said brook, during the times 
of freshet, by the water turned into it by the metropolitan 
water and sewerage board from Doleful pond and the sur- 
rounding country. The metropolitan water and sewerage 
board shall assist the said commission by furnishing data in 
its possession relative to the said brook and also such reason- 
able engineering assistance as the commission may require. 
The commissioners shall be appointed within thirty -days after 
the passage of this resolve and shall serve without pay. [Ap- 
proved February 9, 1912. 



Index to Legislation of the Year 1912 



AFFECTING THE 



METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



A. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

Chap. Sect. 

for additional sewer in Mystic valley and for new screening machinery 

at East Boston sewerage pumping station, . . . . .461 2 

for maintenance of Metropolitan Water System, .... 133 1 

for maintenance of North Metropolitan Sewerage System, . . . 132 1 

for maintenance of South Metropolitan Sewerage System, . . . 146 1 

B. 
BOSTON. 

relative to taking of Fisher Hill Reservoir and other works of City of, 

by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, .... 694 1 

C. 

COMMISSION ON ECONOMY AND EFFICIENCY. 

appointment of, for Commonwealth, authorized, .... 719 1 

E. 

EAST BOSTON PUMPING STATION. 

to provide new screening machinery for, . . . , . . 461 1 

F. 

FRAMINGHAM. 

to authorize town of, to enlarge and improve its system of water supply, 656 1 

L. 
LABORERS AND MECHANICS. 

to provide for Saturday half holiday for certain, .... 528 1 

M. 
METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE LOAN. 

authorized for additional sewer in Mystic valley and for new' screening 

machinery at East Boston pumping station, . . . . . 461 2 

METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 

may take Fisher Hill Reservoir and certain other works of city of Boston, 694 1 

to construct new sewer in Mystic valley and new screening machinery at 

East Boston pumping station, ....... 461 1 

METROPOLITAN WATER LOAN. 

authorized for purchase of certain works of city of Boston, . . . 694 2 

METROPOLITAN WATER SYSTEM. 

appropriation for maintenance of, ...... . 133 1 



248 INDEX. 



N. 

Chap. Sect. 
NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

to provide for new sewer in Mystic valley and for new screening ma- 
chinery at East Boston pumping station in, . . . . . 461 1 
appropriation for maintenance of, ...... . 132 1 

S. 
SATURDAY HALF HOLIDAY. 

to provide for, for certain employes, ...... 528 1 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

appropriation for maintenance of ....... . 146 1 

SPOT POND BROOK. 

appointment of commissioners authorized, to investigate condition of, 
in Stoneham, Melrose and Maiden, ..... Res. 10 

STONEHAM. 

to provide for determining damages to be paid to, by reason of taking 

of Spot Pond for Metropolitan Water Works, .... 689 1